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Old 18-02-2021, 11:33   #16
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Re: So, like... Bristol 40, 43, 45...

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Originally Posted by SailSonoma View Post
I've been a live aboard, and run term charters, on a Bristol 41.1 Center Cockpit sloop for the past three years.

I've found that the two stateroom, two full head layout has been very comfortable. Great stowage throughout. Systems have been remarkably reliable and when repairs have been needed, fairly easy. Of course she was a well maintained boat when I bought her. Annual maintenance budget has been at the 10% mark over the past eight years that I have owned the boat.

She does well on offshore passages, and with the board down, sails beautifully and well balanced up wind in all wind and sea conditions.

I think that the current market price for the Ted Hood designed boats, in good condition, represents a great value. Of course I'm biased
I can echo most of this post, incl. the bias part. I just got done living on my 47.7 CC sloop the past 10 mos. and never felt short on space for me or my belongings. Like the 41.1, mine has the two-cabin/two-head layout, along with a very comfortable double and single sea berth in the main saloon which myself & crew use on passage. Overall length on deck is 47' and waterline length is 37', so a total of 10' of overhang. Probably a narrower beam (13'3") by modern boat standards, but this can be deceiving since many modern boats lack the storage that can consume some of the interior space. These boats were built in an era where offshore boats had more pronounced "pinched" ends so there is less room than modern boats fwd & aft. On the other hand, a narrower beam often improves sailing performance, esp. upwind.

Bristol stopped production in the early to mid-90's so maintenance will very much depend on an individual boat's history. I don't think it's inherently better or worse than other boats, and probably better when it comes to hull & deck integrity, blistering, water infiltration, etc., but again YMMV based on maintenance history. As for the centerboard, it seems I've heard more positive stories than negative when it comes to reliability/maintenance, but in my case I unfortunately had enough problems that I opted to have it sealed inside the centerboard well. This can fairly easily be undone, but I personally didn't feel that the performance benefits (upwind only) outweighed the add'l hassle and expense of making it right (some poor PO maintenance in my case). Ainia has literally sailed around the world in his 45.5 (same boat as the 47.7 but with a reverse transom) so he may have more insight on this. So far I haven't missed the centerboard, and think the Hood-designed "whale" bottom makes up for much of any loss of speed and pointing ability, despite only having a 4'11" draft w/o the board.

My own experience and by reputation generally, these boats were well built and sail better than their hefty displacement might suggest. At this point, however, there are plenty out there which haven't been well maintained, so like with any older boat (and some newer boats) it's buyer beware.
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Old 18-02-2021, 13:12   #17
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Re: So, like... Bristol 40, 43, 45...

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Originally Posted by Papasail View Post
Sailing to windward seems to be a key feature, as well...
Our Kelley-Peterson 46 was designed for comfortable cruising and it sails well upwind. There are lots of similar boats that are suitable to take you anywhere you want to go.
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Old 18-02-2021, 14:00   #18
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Re: So, like... Bristol 40, 43, 45...

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Our Kelley-Peterson 46 was designed for comfortable cruising and it sails well upwind. There are lots of similar boats that are suitable to take you anywhere you want to go.
Another boat with a good reputation. The only one I was ever on seemed to have a roomier cockpit than my similarly-sized Bristol.
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Old 18-02-2021, 15:03   #19
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Re: So, like... Bristol 40, 43, 45...

Papa, I know your title doesnt go down to 35.5, but have to comment, not as a live-aboard, but as an owner. My 35.5 is more stoutly built and I compare it to circa late 1970's/early 80's Sabres and Tartans, also well built boats. Narrow beam (10'10") by modern standards so less space below versus newer boats of similar length, but hey, if you want space....go with a cat...

The quality of build has resulted in lower maintenance, but advanced age does mean - check tanks (diesel good & bow fresh water needs interior re-coating (in process))/chainplates (like new)/standing rigging (replaced as install date unknown). My centerboard allows me a draft of 3' 10" so skinny-able and no issues to date with its use.

And as noted earlier, moves through the water despite her 15,000 LB displacement and length at waterline 27.5 ft. Overall, a feeling of security to date, but admittedly no crazy seas/winds....oh, and really not "tender" - in 20-30 knot winds heels to 10-15 degrees and stops..thnks
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Old 19-02-2021, 11:02   #20
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Re: So, like... Bristol 40, 43, 45...

We have a 1982 B38.8 which we plan on full time cruising once the kitty is a little larger,
Very sea kindly, easy to shorthand, yes it has some comprises, but compared to the 40, it’s roomier.
Large quarter berth- almost a dbl. huge head-
Build quality is incredible- all system easy to work on, chain plates accessible, good storage, nice galley, and important for me 6’4” headroom throughout. Find a nice Bristol- 38.8- 45.5 you won’t go wrong. Cheers
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Old 19-02-2021, 12:19   #21
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Re: So, like... Bristol 40, 43, 45...

I have had my Bristol 41.1 for about 22 years. It is for sale now, and with refit to your specs would be under $150k I am sure. It is a great sailing boat, very liveable. They are a great value these days of lighter construction and condo style living. I was talking to a broker, who used to sell new Bristols, and a 41.1, built today to the standards of what Bristol built, it would be approximately $1mil. 3/4 inch solid teak sole, teak stick framed interior, not glued in liner construction. Strong deck to hull connection, most everything is accessible. I will be putting it on CF at some point, I have listed it in a couple of other places with some response. You can alway message me here.
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Old 19-02-2021, 19:19   #22
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Re: So, like... Bristol 40, 43, 45...

TY to all for their generous input!
Not to wrankle anyone’s nose, but I do land on the monohull side of the debate. Fear and dread haven’t sat well with me where dual unprotected rudders are concerned. I’ve seen some extremely sad sinkings, when the anchors drug during the night. I did play fair when doing my initial research, and at anchor, you do have to call a Catamaran paradise, as a floating livingroom.

my next post will shed some light on other practical considerations, given all the histories of long-term boat storage, and extended refits:
(read that): I just bought a Farm in Maine, with a nice big barn that is situated 30 minutes from Belfast Bay. Whatever I buy, needs to stick in the barn, and I have to measure on Beam fit, for the inner barn posts, and trailer/ keel to deck height for clearance through the doors into the barn, and of course headroom. A cat simply won’t work. *I measured beam posts, and I think I’m around 12 to 13 feet, depending on length and tapering from either end... If i install it bow in, or stern in. What REALLY has me worried, is height... I have to figure out how it can be hauled from Belfast Bay to my property (Unity, Maine), and avoid any low powerlines all the way up. That part is making me break out in hives. The boat MUST travel. If I can make that happen, I have an ideal situation.

B
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Old 19-02-2021, 19:32   #23
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Re: So, like... Bristol 40, 43, 45...

*This is another reason that a shoal-draft boat will offer me additional advantages.

*I currently own a Chrysler 22’ sailboat with a swing-keel, and man-alive, I have to say that my 24” draft is super nice, allowing me to sail right up to shore. I haven’t splashed it in Maine yet, but it was how I always did business when I had it on a lake in Arkansas. Maine is unfortunately quite rocky. But before I drop it, it needs to be “oceanized,” and an appropriate anchor purchased. Only sailboat mass-manufactured by a car company, and the pop-top makes it a very fun time, like an RV on the water.
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Old 20-02-2021, 19:01   #24
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Re: So, like... Bristol 40, 43, 45...

If you're going to be in Unity, try China Lake with your Chrysler 22 - once the ice is out.
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Old 20-02-2021, 21:24   #25
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Re: So, like... Bristol 40, 43, 45...

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If you're going to be in Unity, try China Lake with your Chrysler 22 - once the ice is out.


TY! I will!
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