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Old 25-08-2020, 18:53   #1
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semi-liveaboard boat

I am in need of some assistance in deciding if the idea in my head is eight good or bad. I live in San Jose, Ca and living anywhere around here is expensive. Therefore, the idea is get a boat that is comfortable enough to stay on for 2 to 3 days a week and go home for the rest of the week. The boat could be docked somewhere in the Rio Del Mar, Ca area an hour or so away. This is a change of scene (Ocean) and life (different vibe). Since working at home is now a thing it kind of made sense to me.

Looking at boats, I was thinking in the range of 40 to 46. I really like Carverís and Silverton they both seem to use the space on the boats very efficiently and are over all designed well.

The question is a difficult one to answer.

(1) I Love just sitting on the water if the boat does not ever move of the dock I am in heaven Ė From my readings, a Diesel Engine would not be the best choice, since they like to be run to stay healthier. Gas on the other hand has its issues but are quite a bit cheaper to get into. In short, the boat is not going to move much.
(2) The AFT cabin is nice since you do not need to crawl into bed and 3 side can be reach. Just a preference
(3) A nice size galley. Again the Carver 404 / 444 and the Silverton 392 has nice size galleys
(4) And the hardest thing I am having to find and I know the question has been asked a million time. How much can I expect it to cost. Everything I find on living on a boat and how much it coast is because people are on them 365 days a year and use the boats. I want to use it as a temporary condominium on the water.
(5) Last but not least Good Idea / Bad Idea




Thank you
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Old 25-08-2020, 19:43   #2
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Re: semi-liveaboard boat

Power boats offer a lot of room for their length. You could do something quite a bit smaller and still be comfortable. Get on a few and look around. Since you don't care if you move around you may be able to get one cheaply if the motor needs work or is inoperable. Some marinas require a boat to leave it's slip once a year under it's own power. If you keep the boat clean and are a model tenant it likely won't be enforced.
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Old 25-08-2020, 23:42   #3
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Re: semi-liveaboard boat

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Originally Posted by antron12345 View Post
I am in need of some assistance in deciding if the idea in my head is eight good or bad. I live in San Jose, Ca and living anywhere around here is expensive. Therefore, the idea is get a boat that is comfortable enough to stay on for 2 to 3 days a week and go home for the rest of the week. The boat could be docked somewhere in the Rio Del Mar, Ca

Do you mean Rio Vista, Ca.?
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Old 26-08-2020, 03:42   #4
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Re: semi-liveaboard boat

Once you add up the costs of a slip and ongoing maintenance (a boat thatís not used requires just as much if not more than a boat thatís used all the time) there is no way this endeavor will cost less than a studio to 1 bedroom apartment.

Imho, terrible idea.
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Old 26-08-2020, 04:27   #5
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Re: semi-liveaboard boat

If it is a good idea to the OP, it is a good idea. It is theit life and money.
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Old 26-08-2020, 07:09   #6
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Re: semi-liveaboard boat

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If it is a good idea to the OP, it is a good idea. It is theit life and money.


True, but the OP did ask if it was a good idea or not.
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Old 26-08-2020, 18:33   #7
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Re: semi-liveaboard boat

The area that I was looking at to get another place, the numbers just did not pencil out, that's why the boat idea. I know that there are set fees that are a must (Slip / Paint / fuel / mortgage / etc...)

The parts that I am not sure about is the maintenance. I know there is no answer for this but there is experience, and that I don't have.

From things I have read the calculation everyone gives are from people living full time on the boat, and using their boats as well (By use they go distances not just harbor cruises)

Since the most I would do is take the boat on harbor tours for friends. I don’t see many hours being added to the engines. Before doing some research I thought that low hours was a good thing like a car but this is not the case. If a marine engine isn’t used enough things happen, diesel is what I saw has this issue. So I thought gas engines. They seem to be better for longer stays of nonuse or light use, but need maintenance about 30% more than a diesel engine. Then again diesel boat do cost quite a bit more.

If you take a Year 2000 50 foot Caver that is prices at $150,000 the about coast is 10% of the value of the boat so $15,000, and that is for normal use. These are the number that I found. Do these numbers stay the same / reduce by X% or do they increase because of nonuse. I do realize that some year will be more than other.

Thanks
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Old 26-08-2020, 19:16   #8
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Re: semi-liveaboard boat

For repairs, the only way to damage a boat more than using it is not using it.
Think of it like a tooth. If you have a cavity or loose tooth, you notice it when you chew food. You go get it fixed.
If you dont use it, you dont notice the damage, it rots out, then you go pay to have it replaced... more expensive!
There are lots of boats that dont leave the marina, nothing wrong with that. But go to the marina and talk to some staff and members. See what the real numbers are there.
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Old 26-08-2020, 21:40   #9
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Re: semi-liveaboard boat

I donít think you will find too many gas engines in the size boat you are thinking about getting. Need the torque of a diesel to push the bigger boat. Suggest looking at boats that have no wood trim. Much easier to maintain
Fuel is actually a minimal expense compared to slip fees, insurance and taxes. And donít think that you can get insurance for a boat that size without showing that you are capable of operating it safely. It is not at all like a car or motor home that you just call up and give your credit card number.
Are you a handy guy? Willing to jump in and fix things as needed? Calling a marine mechanic to fix things can be very expensive. A boat that size has lots of systems just waiting to not work.
Not saying to not do it but need to have your ducks and bucks in a row to make it happen.
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Old 27-08-2020, 15:15   #10
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Re: semi-liveaboard boat

This is exactly the kind of information i am looking for so thank you all very much.

I am handy enough to get into trouble as well as smart enough to get out of it or call for help. Iím okay with light electrical / pluming, engine work might take a bit of practice but I do have friends that are good at it. As nice as wood is I agree 100% the less for me the better those are some of the things I'm not inclined to do. I guess one of the points I will need to look into is insurance and me operating the boats valid point and something I havenít seen before.

I have been trying to talk to more and more people about this idea to assess the viability. On my next adventure to the Marina (I hope this weekend) I am armed with better information and questions to ask.

If anyone has any other thoughts I hear to listen and learn.

thx
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