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Old 17-05-2019, 22:53   #1
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Planning!

TL;DR

Never sailed before, planning to buy a 27-35' boat to circle the world and live on in ~20mo.

Boat ideas

I'm looking for a Yawl rigged boat or a Bristol 27 with a cutter sail plan.

I reason the yawl/ketch & cutter design will provide smaller sails for a singlehander to manage. Also, the yawl with its rear sail provides a mechanism to balance the boat to the wind.

Why?

This question is one of the most common I hear. In short, because I am tired of being tied down. I have been stuck in a rut for my whole life now and it's time to see the world!


SO are these good boat choices for what I have in mind? I'm a little concerned about realistic space on a 27, but I'm open.

I've read every post I can concerning long term live aboard.
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Old 17-05-2019, 23:44   #2
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Re: Planning!

There's a lot of (mostly youngish) folks on small boats. 35' is (or could be considered by some as) downright luxurious! There's probably 1000 posts on this forum simply directing folks to atomvoyages.com for info on how to make the most of it.. James Baldwin is the guru of small boat cruising.

My take is don't sweat the yawl/ketch thing if you're looking at this size. Even a sloop rigged setup is pretty manageable for a single-hander. You'll drastically limit your options of what's available on the market, and you're just as well to make up any difference with judicious reefing and by simply setting the boat up for easier sail management from the cockpit. Ditto with balancing the rig...learn to trim the sails and invest in a good auto-pilot and/or windvane setup.

The biggest downside to small boat cruising, to me, is the slower passagemaking. We sometimes buddy boat with others and, more often than not as the smallest boat, we are the last to the destination. We've sometimes gotten caught out in deteriorating wx when faster boats were already safely in harbor.
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Old 18-05-2019, 00:30   #3
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Re: Planning!

I own a ketch, my experience is the mizzen is very inefficient to just useless in most points of sail down wind. 2 masts, double the lines, double the sail management. If your boat is less than 40 feet, sloop is the way to go singlehanded. After single handing a ketch for years, I still don't see what the advantage is over a sloop, unless the sails are too large to manage by yourself. and the yawls that have a very small sail flying on the transom is pretty much useless
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Old 18-05-2019, 00:42   #4
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Re: Planning!

Thank you for your input.
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Old 18-05-2019, 12:43   #5
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Re: Planning!

Agree. The size of the sail isn’t an issue single-handing — the difficulty comes when the systems are not well set up. I have no issues on a 50’ sloop when the systems are well designed and the equipment is there. Doubling the amount of kit you have to maintain is not going to make your life easier. I see the point of a ketch rig on a much larger boat, but really on a 27-footer it’s nonsensical.

Regarding space — the most significant creator of space is to get a more modern boat. Every decade newer will make your boat larger inside (for the same overall length), easier to sail, and less likely to need serious work.
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Old 18-05-2019, 15:28   #6
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Re: Planning!

I now see the error of my thinking, now that I've begun looking at boats again, it seems a more practicable timeline is 36 months, after which I can afford a boat in the 42-50 feet range and a boat that is substantially newer. Buying a 1960s/70s $15000 rotting mess in the end will cost as much as a mid 90s or early 00s 38', where rot won't be an issue.
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Old 18-05-2019, 16:04   #7
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Re: Planning!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rowingdude View Post
I now see the error of my thinking, now that I've begun looking at boats again, it seems a more practicable timeline is 36 months, after which I can afford a boat in the 42-50 feet range and a boat that is substantially newer. Buying a 1960s/70s $15000 rotting mess in the end will cost as much as a mid 90s or early 00s 38', where rot won't be an issue.
FWIW, there are examples of boats from the '60s that are bristol, and boats less than 10 years old that are a screwturn away from the scrapyard. How a particular boat has been cared for over the course of it's life is much more important. Likewise, there are examples of 'brand x' boat that span the gammit.

You'll notice when out cruising that, besides the charter boat fleets, no two that are exactly alike. The trick is figuring out what works for you! You can put a good starting bet down, but the only real trick is time on the water.

Cheers!
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Old 18-05-2019, 19:07   #8
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Re: Planning!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rowingdude View Post
I now see the error of my thinking, now that I've begun looking at boats again, it seems a more practicable timeline is 36 months, after which I can afford a boat in the 42-50 feet range and a boat that is substantially newer. Buying a 1960s/70s $15000 rotting mess in the end will cost as much as a mid 90s or early 00s 38', where rot won't be an issue.
Absolutely. If in doubt, watch Sail Life videos where poor old Mads has eventually found that absolutely every part of his mid-80s Warrior needs replacing.
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Old 18-05-2019, 20:17   #9
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Re: Planning!

I will do that, thank you.
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