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Old 17-11-2017, 11:17   #16
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

I left St.Louis 20 yrs ago to go cruising. Everything is a trade off for living aboard. You would be surprised at what you don't need. I would gladly give up everything all over again. We still love living on our Hardin Voyager 44. It depends on your budget but you will need to sell or donate the majority of your belongings. Good luck with dreams ...
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Old 17-11-2017, 11:28   #17
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

I keep a few of my favorite nail polishes aboard (yes both hands and feet). Acrilic or gel nails are hard to keep looking good aboard. Though at the dock not so bad.

Shoes alas, there isn't room for more then a few pair and the salt air will cause mold, UGH... so only having a few pair at a time is probably fine (It's not, but I make do). A pair or two of flats, a pair of boots and yes I use to have heels aboard too. but they are less the practical (such a bad word) on a wood dock or dinghy. Really I go barefoot a lot now and have flipflops for the wood docks. I know but I do enjoy the boating lifestyle and some changes are required..

Makeup, I keep a the basic's aboard for a night out. (foundation, blush, eyebrow and eyeliner, shadow, etc,etc). Somedays I get fancy, others plain jane.

Hair is a toughy, as the wind will trash any styling rather quickly. Simple is better. A good shampoo, conditioner, detangler (it's windy!) I dropped the curling iron and rarely use the hair dryer though I have one. But it requires that the generator to run and that's a pain.

Sunscreen is a must and waterproof makeup is a good idea too.

On a boat the closet, called the hanging locker is maybe 18" wide. So an evening dress or two for nights out and a few really nice top's, pants skirts. Again that mold thingy will trash clothing so a few items that get replenished over time help. lots of shorts and tee's too.

So it's a compromise with all of it. unless you have a 75 foot (or larger) motor yacht. then you can have it all... mostly....
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Old 17-11-2017, 11:35   #18
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

I've actually given this a fair amount of thought. I've done several charter in the tropics, and my husband and I are planning to move our boat to the Caribbean, and eventually the Med, for long-term cruising. I care about my appearance, but I'm also familiar with the limitations you have living on a boat. What I'm used to is a good-sized (50 foot) monohull or cat, with AC, heads and showers for each stateroom, and a fair amount of storage.

At least in the tropics, you'll find you want a simple wardrobe - swim suits and coverups, sundresses, shorts, that kind of thing. I also have a few simple long dresses for evening. I find boat shoes and sparkly flat or low wedge sandals do the trick. I do wear Tevas when I'm walking around in the water - they are unattractive but for water shoes, there's really no substitute. Heels are not practical or necessary - the heels will get caught in docks, trip you up, and generally be a mess.

As far as makeup and hair, you also want to simplify. I use CityBlock, a tinted sunscreen, maybe BeneTint, eyeliner and mascara, and lipstick. More than that feels and looks out of place. You might want to think about permanent eyeliner, laser hair removal, and getting to a hair color and hairstyle that require little maintenance. Agree with other posters that a pedicure is not hard to maintain, but a polish manicure is tough.

Jewelry, I usually just have some gold and inexpensive pearl items. You don't want anything really valuable.
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Old 17-11-2017, 11:41   #19
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

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Lets talk "girl talk"!!!

I love to sail.. I love to race... I love to work on boats, and I am looking forward to (a very early) retirement as a full time live aboard/cruiser. That being said... I am also a "girly girl"!! I've had drawers filled with makeup, hair bobs... styling tools, closets FILLED to the rafters with gorgeous "girl clothes".. and over 100 pairs of high heeled shoes. (no.. I'm not kidding!!! lol) In other words.. I like to look feminine, pretty.. sometimes glamorous.. but always a GIRL!

I fully understand that I will not be able to bring it all with me. But I don't want to give up being a "girly girl". It's an integral part of who I am.

So, my question is: for those of you women who also love to be pretty and feminine... how do you do that on a boat in the tropics? What products and tools are "must haves"? And what should I toss? Any tips for keeping your skin and hair healthy and radiant? do you find certain styles of clothes and shoes work well in the tropics, but are still feminine and pretty? (I'm not the TEVA/Birkenstock kind of girl.. AT ALL!!) How do you get your nail polish to dry?!?! (lol.. perfectly painted toes are a MUST!!!) What about jewelry and accessories? Do certain types of jewelry not do well in the salt water environment? (i.e. silver.. pearls, etc)

... and anything else that fits in the category of "all things beautiful and girly"!


If your real name is "DAVE" then have fun.

Take what you want but watch out for heels. I carry mine and put them on once off the boat.

In hot climes, lip liners and lip stick I keep my normal use ones in the fridge.

Paula
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Old 17-11-2017, 11:50   #20
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

I must say Scarlet sounds like the ideal woman.
I am opting for an early "semi-retirement" (I work when I choose and only to maintain a more-than-comfortabble lifestyle) in order to go cruising while I still have the means and health. My question, Scarlet, is this: have you done any extended cruising, particularly in the setting you desire (Caribbean? Coastal? Other?). And while doing that cruising did you attempt to sort out what essentials you need? The women who have replied so far have suggested that you might be able to maintain your femininity with a much more modest collection of clothes and makeup but you'd have to decide for yourself what amount of "girly gear" you'd find acceptable. Best way to do that is to go on a "trial cruise" with someone who can accommodate a modest amount of your "girly gear". Then you'll discover what you truly need and what you don't.

One guy got skewered for considering the possibility that you aren't already in a relationship so I won't make that assumption. However, I have a 36' center cockpit boat with empty lockers and drawers and an empty berth. I'll be cruising the Bahamas this winter so if you'd like to entertain the idea of doing a "trial cruise" for 5-7 days, drop me a note. I am making this same offer to my many friends who have dreams of cruising. It allows them to get a taste of cruising life. The caveat? I will not sail with anyone whom I have met - in person or through extensive online communication - to insure there's a fundamental compatibility. Give it some thought.

At any rate, I find boat hair and flats very sexy and if she can also tie a bowline, make a meal, trim a sail, and be an otherwise equal sailing partner then that would be like winning the lottery.
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Old 17-11-2017, 12:11   #21
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

Scarlet, my wife is definitely a ‘girly girl’ and has adjusted to cruising extremely well. No, she didn’t bring heels (dangerous even on docks!), although she does have over 20 pairs of shoes/sandals/flip flops on board. That being said, yes, she does have Tyveks for hiking.

I think you’ll find that Sperry produces a wide selection of flats and sandals that are feminine and attractive and yet also have a proper boating sole that will protect the decks. They also tend to be made out of leather and other materials that can withstand some salt water. If we are going ashore in the dinghy, she may place her dressy shoes and purse in a waterproof bag until we are ashore.

She also has a number of dresses and tops that are suitable for going out, although they are ones that can be handwashed, rather than dry cleaned. A ‘hobo iron’ (water sprayed from a water botlle and then hand snapping out wrinkles on a hangar) works great.

Jewelry? She left most really valuable items at home and is always careful not to wear anything valuable when going out, except on the rare occasions that we are taking a taxi directly from a marina to a restaurant and back. Don’t make yourself a target. Indeed, she generally leaves her engagement ring off, even though it never left her hand at home.

Nails? She does keep her finger and toe nails polished, although recognizes that it is impossible to keep them pristine on a boat. Once every couple of months she will have a manicure and pedicures and they are available on most of the larger islands and often at much lower cost than at home.
Once every couple of months she also gets her hair done professionally, although in a cut that she can maintain without a hair dryer, straightener or curling iron. Yes, she has them on board (and we have an inverter sufficient to allow her to use the hairdryer and the straightener is butane ). Its just that she has found that her hair curls in the heat and humidity no matter what she does and it is not worth the effort.

Make up? She wears sunscreen during the day, although does wear makeup and lip gloss when going out at night. She has a small, battery powered led make-up mirror with magnifying lens that she places on a cabinet opposite a seat in our stateroom.

The good news is that since you and your husband are considering a cat, you should have space sufficient for a wardrobe, hair products and makeup that will allow you to remain a girly girl. And that will include back up supplies of razors, make up and hair products of your choice which will likely be hard to find.

When it comes to cruising I think you’ll eventually find that while less is more, you should never have to go without the things you really need to be you.

Brad
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Old 17-11-2017, 12:13   #22
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

Scarlet,

As Seaworthy Lass said, MOISTURIZER & SUNBLOCK!! And, cultivate wearing a sun hat if you're going to hang out in the tropics. Start out with an absolute minimum of makeup, and buy new along the way. Women like to look nice most everywhere. And, if there are products you especially like, you can arrange temporary addresses (like friends or marinas) to have products shipped in from overseas, and try French products in the Societies!

Start out with one pair of heels, maybe stroppy sandals, flops, hiking boots, and cross trainers. Replace as needed. Yes, good shoes and leather handbags tend to suffer from mold.

Gold doesn't tarnish. But as to jewelry, if you're going into strange to you cities, jewelry is an invitation to theft and muggings, and I would confine it to private gatherings, except for pierced stud earrings. Avoid rings while sailing, to not risk losing the finger. Bring a few favorites, and a rouge cloth to keep them looking good.

A good wash and wear haircut is really best. After a swim, a small dollop of conditioner on the hair that you rinse off with fresh water will help rinse off all the salt, and keep the hair shiny and supple.

Before I left, I made a few "play suits", top and shorts sewn together, with matching skirts, to wear "in town". The effect was like a sundress, but could be worn as shorts, too. On the boat, I lived in swim suits and tops and shorts. You'll need a party dress. (Some people, more formal than us, actually carry formal attire. I think its care on a small boat would be daunting.) Levis for the cold, and working on the boat, plus 2 long sleeved shirts (against mosquitos).

Sleepwear and unders is up to what pleases you, with the caveat that cotton is healthier in the tropics, breathes better than nylon.

Ann
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Old 17-11-2017, 12:31   #23
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

Scarlet, Julie just corrected me - she does use a hair dryer from time to time when we are at a marina. In addition, she reminded me that for clothes that should not be put in a dryer, we have a tub room where we have hotel type retractable, cord clothes lines that work well with a hatch open above, or a fan directed at the clothing. You are bound to have a spare head or two on your cat, so while many items can be dried on the lifelines, you needn’t worry about expensive items being blown off or stained by dirt or rust embedded in the lifelines.
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Old 17-11-2017, 12:58   #24
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

You may be surprised to hear that due to problems with limited fresh water and minimal laundry facilities, most cruisers in the tropics stop wearing clothes once the land's behind them. So really the only cosmetics required are ample amounts of sun block...oh, and boat shoes and a floppy hat with a string.
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Old 17-11-2017, 13:14   #25
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

You know, often I would poke fun, but I've got to respect such unapologetic honesty and realism.

Go get it!
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Old 17-11-2017, 13:27   #26
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

Make sure your heels are non-marking. Nothing like black marks all over the cockpit and sole.

Don't get PO at your male companion when your heel gets caught between the dock boards and rips off. It's not his fault. And he's not laughing at you, he's laughing with you.

Nail polish is a bear to get off fiberglass. The only thing that lasts longer on fiberglass is Cetol. Nail polish on the interior fabric is there forever.

Brushing hair- outside. Never, ever below decks.

Lipstick makes a good temporary marker on fiberglass, like marking lines before a race if you have new crew. Men: always put it back where you found it for plausible deniability. When the inevitable inquiry arrives, don't deny, just dummy up.

Sanitary napkins beat the best Bounty paper towels every day of the week. Keep a few handy for quickly mopping up blood- no kidding. Doesn't look great, but taped over a cut will allow you to keep sailing without bleeding all over the place. Yeah, if you're the first one to try it and are spotted you'll catch hell, but guarantee within a year you'll see one of you mates replicate the act. If you're a bachelor keep them hidden, lest a lady visitor want to know why you have sanitary napkins on a single man's boat.
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Old 17-11-2017, 13:30   #27
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

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...oh, and boat shoes and a floppy hat with a string.

Seriously? Canadians sail naked but with shoes? On this side of the lake we don't wear shoes.
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Old 17-11-2017, 13:45   #28
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

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Actually my curiosity is genuine. Each question I ask would need to be answered whether she was boarding a giant cruise ship or a small sailboat.
I found this one a bit suspect. . .

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Power/voltage requirements for power tools of your trade?
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Old 17-11-2017, 13:48   #29
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

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Pearls? They come from salt water. All the web sites, plus some personal experience, says that chemicals and abrasion harms them, but salt and water do not. The silk (or nylon) thread, however, is subject to damage, but nothing that a freshwater rinse won't fix. They're living jewelry, so wear them.
Thanks for that info!! I have a necklace that my husband had made for me for our 20th anniversary that has a single pearl that we found in Hawaii on our honeymoon 25 yers ago. I wouldn't want to be without it...
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Old 17-11-2017, 13:53   #30
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Re: ...On Being a "Girly Girl"....

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Just out of curiosity?
Do you know how many pounds of gear you need to stay "Girly"?
How many cubic feet of storage it would require?
How often and for how long would the boat need to be perfectly still and stable to get those perfectly painted toes?
Power/voltage requirements for power tools of your trade?
I'm going to assume you are being serious rather than snarky..

I don't know the answers to those questions, other than I would have half of the storage in the head for my toiletries, and the same amount of drawer space/hanging locker space that my husband would have. We are looking at a 45' cat... so, a bit more space than a monohull of the same size.. but still, space is at a limit.
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