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Old 23-09-2017, 11:14   #31
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

I look forward to your data and experiences, Thanks you will better prepare us for our adventures.
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Old 23-09-2017, 16:42   #32
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

As one hoping to head out myself (solo) on my Albin 25 on a budget of about $1500 CAD I will be following this thread assiduously while trying to maintain my vocab as a dotard. Boat and upgrades paid for while earning.
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Old 23-09-2017, 18:43   #33
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

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I will be following this thread assiduously while trying to maintain my vocab as a dotard.
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Old 25-09-2017, 06:17   #34
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

The Westerbeke 33 itself has been a champ. It starts in the cold and after winter layup with only 15 seconds on the glow plugs and maybe 15 seconds cranking, and doesn't go through oil too quickly. What more can you ask of a 35 year old diesel? (No hour counter for some dang reason.) I haven't done a compression test and an oil analysis is still in the works, but I don't think their would show terrible news. The only issues I have had are with the marine bolt ons (heat exchanger, exhaust manifold, fresh water pump). The water pump">raw water pump was replaced at some point in its life, so no need to do it again, yet.



Stuffing box/coupler/cutlass/packing: Seemed like an easy first project for me to do over winter. Surely needed to be done as well.

Starter: A spare.

Zincs: I eat through zincs too quickly. Have another thread going on this issue.

Heat exchanger/exhaust manifold: I had a spat of overheating issues over the last two years. After having both the heat exchanger and exhaust manifold professional cleaned by a radiator shop, and rebuilding with silicon gaskets, it has finally been solved. Did 200+ miles on the ICW without an issue.

Engine alarm: Due to the above, I installed an extra layer of notification of something going bad.

Injector cleaning: Had some white smoke coming out of the exhaust. Couldn't tell if it was fuel or steam, so I chose to get the injectors cleaned as they probably never had it done. The shop actually just replaced them. Cleared up the smoke issue quite well.

Engine water pump: A few weeks before departure date, the fresh water pump on the engine blew up. Good thing I already had a spare!

Oil changing system: Not really a "system," but a hand pump connected to the drain hose already installed on the base of the engine.

Shaft brush: See my zinc issue.
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Old 25-09-2017, 06:28   #35
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Re: No longer a wannabe!



Running rigging (rope, $1,500): All the running rigging on the boat was old and stiff, except for the jib sheets which were brand new. Not wanting to encounter breaking halyards during a squall, replacement was needed. Bought a 500' spool of Samson XLS for high load applications and a 500' spool of Samson MLX for all else, both sized 3/8". Also have some Regatta Braid for the main sheet and too much AmSteel in different sizes for various tasks.

Running rigging (clutches/blocks/organizers, $1,500): The original clutches wouldn't hold the slippery Samson XLS, so had to replace with new Lewmar D2 clutches. Replaced the blocks in the main sheet system to reduce friction. Also got some new blocks for other high load areas, such as halyards.

Running rigging (winches, cam cleats, $1,000): The coachroof originally had 4 non-self tailing winches. Replaced with two slightly larger self-tailing winches that I picked up used. Also replaced the traveler cam cleats with something that actually held.

Running rigging (floating jib cars, $200): Copied Dockhead's floating jib car system. It is awesome. Really allows fine tuning of the jib. Still have a bit to learn.

Boom Brake: Seemed like a good idea, and for the most part it is. Still working on finding the best line for the job and best location for the attachment points on deck. When it works, it works really well at controlling the boom during a gybe.

Anchoring system: Original anchor sucks; gotta get that new generation. After much back and forth, I went Mantus because, well, they are from Texas and so am I. I admit that 35 pounds is a bit undersized according to their chart. But I'll be anchoring in generally favorable conditions in the Caribbean, so I believe (hope?) it will workout. I also don't have a windless (yet), so hauling up another heavier could get old. Went with a pale (90') of 5/16 G4 US made chain and 200' of 5/8 8-plait. So far this system kicks butt.

Spin sock and whisker pole: The boat came with a hardly used a-sym spin. However, without a sock, it was a pain to use. In a fit of "damn the budget, I wanna sail" I went for the sock and a pole. Haven't gotten to use it too much, but when I have, it has been quite fun.

Boom vang: Boat did not come with a boom vang of any short. I wasn't keen on a ridged vang because of the cost, installation hassle, and the fact that it would interfere with a hatch. Plus, my traveler does a pretty good job as a vang while hard on the wind and I have a strong track on the toe rail. Therefore, I went with a soft boom vang that I attach to the toe rail when cracked off the wind. Has been a MARVELOUS addition and really increased sailing performance.

Rangefinder/binocular: Are these a refit costs? Don't know, but they are helpful for many reasons. I have zero ability to tell distance at anchor, so the rangefinder has been great in this respect. Binoculars are obvious.

EPIRB: Duh.
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Old 25-09-2017, 06:45   #36
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

The electric system has been the most interesting aspect of this project. I knew nothing about electricity before and now, well, I still probably know nothing. But I can be dangerous.

My drive in this system is for it to not let me down. It must be dependable and reliable. It must provide me with enough power to run the autopilot and refrigerator without worry. I saw too many YouTube videos of people eating with one little light on because the didn't have enough power. Or being confused when their batteries die. This wasn't going to be me!

I said I wasn't going to name names, but I have to specifically thank Mainesail and Stu Jackson for all their contributions! I would have been dead in the water without them.



Battery bank: Six 6-volt golf cart batteries for a sticker capacity of 645 amp hours. And for the kicker, I have no starter battery! None! I strongly considered lithium, but veered away. Maybe if I had an alternator on the engine that was fit for the task.

Solar: Two 140 watt flexible panels and two 100 watt normal panels. The 140's are wired in parallel together, as are the 100's. They all sit above the bemini. Will add addition info on to Steadyhand's on-running thread one day. Each set goes to their own Victron controller. (The Morningstar was replaced.)

Inverter/charger: I originally didn't want either an inverter or charger on the boat, but I eventually came to the conclusion that I can't go completely solar. And once I settled on having a water maker that required a Honda 2000 generator, I set to get the largest charger I could use with such Honda and my bank. And when I realized that with only a bit more money invested, I could also have a large inverter... I ended up with the Victron inverter/charger with a 2000 watt inverter and 80 amp charger. It is really a fantastic piece of equipment. Way overkill for most, but has allowed me to go all electric cooking. And the battery bank accepts the charger's full output at 14.7v up until about 95% SOC.

Electric system monitors: Victron amp counter and a Smart Gauge monitor. Gives me all the data needed to know the health and status of the batteries. And with all this Victron gear, I just couldn't resist buying the GX Color monitor, which links the solar controllers, inverter/charger and amp hour meter together into one screen. It also logs all the data, so I can discover general trends of ACTUAL power production (solar and generator) and usage (DC and AC).

Bilge pumps: (Sorry, odd section for these guys.) Either way, I replaced the old Rule 2000 that came with the boat with a new Rule 2000. Kept the old one and an additional new one as spares. I also added a Rule 500 to the mix with a small diameter tube (3/8") as a general maintenance pump. (The old Rule 2000 had a check value, which this forum convinced me to remove, but without it, I had too much back flow into my tiny bilge. Hints the Rule 500 as a maintenance pump; the 3/8" tube substantially reduces back flow.)

Bilge switches: Went with the best: each pump has the Ultra Safety switch. The Rule 500 has a high water alarm as well, with a buzzer in the cockpit to alert me to issues.

Bilge pump counter: Counts the run cycles of the Rule 500 maintenance pump. Helped me figure out I had a leak in my fresh water system.
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Old 25-09-2017, 09:01   #37
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

Quote:
Originally Posted by bruce v View Post
I would agree. you've spent a healthy chunk of change but telling people you were over your expected cost is not a realistic evaluation if you were able to allow for a $40,000 pre purchase expenses for refurbishing. that's not really within a $2000/month crusing allowance. I am okay with that if you had the monies set aside as a pre purchase allotment. Many here do not have that kind of monies to begin with and must pay all our normal bills w/o consideration of purchase or cruising budget. I am doing the Great Loop with my wife on a thirty foot Ericson which we bought for $15000. We spent about that much more refurbishing it and are about 80% there. only thing I am wondering is whether you just put in the cost of your supplies or if you also gave credit for the labor (including your own). On ours, we have over 1000 man/woman hours of work to date. If we do minimum wage labor rates, that's $10,000 if yard rates (minimum) its about $85000. Don't forget to include labor costs in your budget if you are looking to help others. Wannabees tend to be unrealistic about what they are able to do (or need to learn to do) and equally so about yard rates. I find that is what keeps many couch potatoes on the couch or returns them there early on in their endeavors. I am not trying to be overly critical as the cruising life is, for us like yourselves, something to be desired, earned and enjoyed. Just want to keep it realistic. Fair winds and following seas my friend
Bruce V
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Huron, Ohio

Hey Bruce - I hope you post about your trip on the Great Loop. That is a trip that I want to do someday. Cheers, Kevin.
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Old 03-10-2017, 05:54   #38
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

If electrical was the most interesting, electronics was the most fun.



VHF/AIS: First addition to the boat was a new VHF with AIS. Also have a spiffy antenna and new coax, which will be installed when I'm back at the boat and the mast is down.

Instruments: Have to give a hat tip to Dockhead, whose obsession of sailing performance gave me the bug. B&G's Zeus2 seems to be the easiest plug and play system that gives a host of valuable data. It is paired with the speed/depth/temp and wind sensors, and with two Triton2 displays. All is NMEA 2000, except for the AIS feed from the VHF, which is still 0183 (but it works well enough).

Autopilot: The boat came with an old wheel autopilot (and it still sits there) that somewhat works when the seas are calm. But with just two of us on the boat and neither one of us with a lot of sailing experience, I thought we'd be better served with a new, strong, smart autopilot. Went with the B&G autopilot as it interfaces with the chart plotter and a Jefa drive (that has been re-labled as Garmin). This thing is awesome. Sailing in Wind Mode is amazing. The drive is about twice as strong as this boat needs, so I'm interested to see it's power consumption, once I really get going.
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Old 03-10-2017, 05:55   #39
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

Carpe Ventum came with a bemini and dodger, but the windows on both needed replacement to be useable. It also snows a lot during the winter in NYC, which makes having a cover useful. After pricing it all out and giving it some thought, I thought I could do a good enough job myself on these projects if I just purchased a sewing machine. And that's what I did. Figured I saved at least half off a professional, including the Sailrite and Edge hot knife.



I replaced the windows in the dodger, extending its life for at least the rest of my cruise. I also patched up several wear spots on it and the bemini. The winter cover I made (which took forever), worked surprisingly well, and now is on the boat to be turned into an awning! None of this work looks particularly professional, but hey, I do what I can. The Sailrite is on the boat, so I can work on other projects, as they come up.
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Old 03-10-2017, 06:18   #40
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

A random assortment of other things that had to be replaced.



Seacock: Broke the handle on one, so had to replace the whole thing. Use a real torch next time. Better yet, maintain your seacocks, as I do now!

LED lights: All new LED navigation lights from MarineBeam. The originals were cloudy. Keeping the original light fixtures inside the boat and just upgrading the bulbs with ones also from MarineBeam.

V-Berth: Purchased a queen sized 8 inch foam mattress from Amazon and cut it to fit. More comfy than my bead at home. Still to be seen how hot it gets.

Teak: Original teak was all gray. To each their own, but the wife really wants it pretty. So, a round of Starbright whitener and cleaner, followed by 3 coats of Cetol nature and 2 coats of Cetol gloss, did the job.

Polish/wax: Followed Mainesail's guide to compound, polish and wax the boat. Will wax and spot polish before splashing in October.

Name: Original name was Show Time (have to do jazz fingers while saying it). It is now Carpe Ventum, meaning Seize the Wind in Latin.



Dinghy: Went with the ugly duck here! More or less the same price as an inflatable, but is indestructible. Plus, it planes to 12 knots in flat seas with just me, and 9 knots with my wife onboard, both with a 6hp outboard. Lets see an inflatable do that!

Washer: Wanted some way to wash clothes onboard, seeing as how we have a water maker. No room for a "real" machine, but we hope this thing works. Haven't used it yet.

Cockpit table: Original one was too small for my wife's liken.

Watermaker: Carpe Ventum has 90 gallons of fresh water tankage. Not a lot, but one would be fine with it in the Caribbean. But I knew my wife would be more comfortable with extra water a water maker brings, so I splurged. Got the Rainman because it doesn't actually install into the boat. Will make re-sale a bit easier and I wasn't sure I had a great location for it to instal anyway.

Oven: All Sabres came with (and many still do), with compressed natural gas. Hard enough to find CNG in the States, let alone the Caribbean. Had to switch to propane, at least I thought. Once I got the Victron inverter/charger and Honda generator, it occurred to me I can go electric cooking. So now we have one induction stove stop and an electric oven. Might add a second induction stove top to the mix soon. About $2,000 cheaper than installing a propane system! Could have a hole thread just on this...
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Old 03-10-2017, 06:21   #41
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

Here is a catch all for tools and smaller items that didn't have a good home above, mostly because they didn't relate to any specific project.



Details on the tools:



Electric: Learned quickly that having the right tool (or crimper) for the job is key to its success. Now have three crimpers and several wire cutting and stripping tools, along with several testers.

Rigging: A host of stuff to splice and cut rope, and tension the rig consistently.

Other: Purchased hand tools and drill bits as needed. I already had a battery power drill and dermal, but the rest needed to be purchased. Used everything at least once on some project or another. Some, like the polisher and grinder won't be coming along with me on the cruiser. The multitool and drills will, as they have been very useful in a range of tasks.



Nothing specific to say here, other than I spent a lot of money on screws and clamps. Have a bit left over for future use, so I guess that is good.
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Old 24-10-2017, 10:37   #42
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

Hi Stephen

Thanks for all the time and effort to post all the info. Most informative

Great boat name

Wishing you fair winds

Cheers

Stephen !
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Old 24-10-2017, 17:00   #43
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

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Originally Posted by Lambretta View Post
Hi Stephen



Thanks for all the time and effort to post all the info. Most informative



Great boat name



Wishing you fair winds



Cheers



Stephen !


Glad you got some info from it!
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Old 24-10-2017, 17:04   #44
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

Psst....
I'll let you in on a little secrete.

After 4yrs of Cruising Mexico and 10yrs of living aboard....I'm still a Wanna-be.
Once you have the Bug...you can't shake it and every day aboard is like Christmas morning.
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Old 28-10-2017, 00:05   #45
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Re: No longer a wannabe!

Quote:
Originally Posted by fallingeggs View Post
If electrical was the most interesting, electronics was the most fun.



VHF/AIS: First addition to the boat was a new VHF with AIS. Also have a spiffy antenna and new coax, which will be installed when I'm back at the boat and the mast is down.

Instruments: Have to give a hat tip to Dockhead, whose obsession of sailing performance gave me the bug. B&G's Zeus2 seems to be the easiest plug and play system that gives a host of valuable data. It is paired with the speed/depth/temp and wind sensors, and with two Triton2 displays. All is NMEA 2000, except for the AIS feed from the VHF, which is still 0183 (but it works well enough).

Autopilot: The boat came with an old wheel autopilot (and it still sits there) that somewhat works when the seas are calm. But with just two of us on the boat and neither one of us with a lot of sailing experience, I thought we'd be better served with a new, strong, smart autopilot. Went with the B&G autopilot as it interfaces with the chart plotter and a Jefa drive (that has been re-labled as Garmin). This thing is awesome. Sailing in Wind Mode is amazing. The drive is about twice as strong as this boat needs, so I'm interested to see it's power consumption, once I really get going.
Thanks again, as others have said, for all this data - very valuable. Since I am in process getting ready for my second and more extensive trip south, I am fixing and or upgrading a lot of things on my boat, so this is a great reference.

A word about software for the iPad - if you are headed to the Caribbean via the Bahamas, you really want to look at Garmin BlueCharts with Explorer Chart data. I found the Explorer charts dead on accurate in my trip to the Abacos earlier this year, and I've heard similar feedback on the Explorer chart coverage for the rest of the Bahamas. I also used the Garmin charts in preference to CMap for the eastern US, though with the normal caveat regarding the accuracy of NOAA chart data in lesser used inlets, i.e., the data for inlets not used by commercial traffic can be very old and inaccurate. But for Cape Fear, Georgetown, Charleston, Port Royal, Brunswick, Fenandina, Mayport and on down you're fine.
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