Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 05-05-2019, 09:24   #16
Registered User
 
dwedeking2's Avatar

Join Date: May 2014
Location: Key West, FL
Boat: Morgan Out Island 415
Posts: 868
Images: 1
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

There's a couple small boats around me in the mooring field. When the wind really blows those boats are bouncing around a lot.
__________________
S/V Pomaika'i Blog
dwedeking2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 09:25   #17
Registered User
 
krismatski's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Location: aboard s/y Anna Lucja / ashore Poland
Boat: Colvic Springtide 24 - modified
Posts: 6
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

Since I retired at age 68 I lived aboard my 24' Colvic Springtide and really enjoyed. Almost all cocking aboard on a alcohol stove. Made a N. Atlantic loop, partly alone, partly with another persons. Some two week gunk holing in three on board. Had plenty of food in the form of wet soups, cans, drys. Definitely preferred warm waters and happy islands. When it got cold and wet Latitudes 40 in winter - was not nice anymore. 135 W solar panel did the job, plus cockpit solar shower to wash salt away once a week. Laundry on shore. Only once in Bermudas I did hand washing in the rainwater, as laundry was too expensive.
__________________
Frankly, my dear, I'd LOVE to give a damn
krismatski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 09:32   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 20
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

25' Coronado
6 years 3000 miles & counting
Cheers
Captd
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20190222_151743.jpg
Views:	147
Size:	414.4 KB
ID:	191462   Click image for larger version

Name:	20181129_183317.jpg
Views:	165
Size:	412.1 KB
ID:	191463  

Captdd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 09:53   #19
Registered User
 
Scout 30's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Florida
Boat: Scout 30
Posts: 3,107
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

Live aboard sailboats take a lot of work to get sailing so they usually just stay in one place. You might want to consider a small power boat instead. Typically have much more room for a given length.
Scout 30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 10:16   #20
Moderator

Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 4,116
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

Goat's advice, quoted here:

"Look for 8,000-10,000 pounds for the first occupant then add 5,000 for each extra person. Consider tankage as well, 40 gallons+ of water, keep everything simple. Small is good. "

is absolutely sound!

My wife and I live for weeks at a time in a 30 foot five-tonner. For your purpose, as you state it, consider that "livability" is more important than "sailability. We have 6'3" headroom in the saloon, and at 6" tall I wouldn't like less. This is achieved by means of a "pilot house" that confers the additional benefit in terms of livability of having large windows so we don't feel as confined as we would in, say, a Mirage 27 [hello Mike ;-)!], or worse yet, a C&C 27. But, obviously, TrentePieds doesn't SAIL as well as either of those boats. Ye pays yer money...:-)!

I cannot believe that you would not have quite a large choice of older, suitable boats in a place like Melbourne. Do you perhaps need to look a little harder?

Your worst problem is going to be storage. Boats require the keeping of a fair bit of miscellaneous clobber such a tools and spare line, odds'n'sods of materials for their upkeep, spare fenders and formerly, in my case, a respectable business suit. I solved that problem by buying a van for the boat. Being barely mobile is all that's required of the van. It's really no more'n a storage shed. More storage volume than you could possibly find in a 30 foot live-aboard. Nice and dry, too!

We have a standard marine toilet with holding tank, of course, but what a pain to deal with! We have no shower. So when we are at our home berth, we trot up to the marina's facilities. The half-mile walk does us good :-). Our home waters are really too cold to swim in, so away from the marina, a "Liverpool wash" substitutes for a shower. The Liverpool wash does the job too on days so rainy that the trot to the marina's shower has no appeal.

We are plugged in to shore power when in our home berth, and a GOOD "intelligent" charger is worth the six hundred Canuckibux, or so, that it costs. Be sensible about you power budget and install LEDs for illumination. Don't waste money on fancy batteries. A couple of "deep cycle" 27 series batt.s from your auto parts suppliers is, IMO, the optimal solution. The are not "quality" batteries but that doesn't matter for a live-aboard. They are cheap enuff to consider disposable :-)!

Do NOT get fancy about your water supply! Do NOT fit the boat with a "snap-on" receptacle for the water hose in order to have pressure water off the dock's supply. The risk of something going "pop" in the boat's onboard plumbing is great, and the consequences of that could well be a sunk boat.

Those are just a couple of considerations for the greenhorn liveaboard. The bane of all liveaboards here on the "wet coast" of NA is the wet that must necessarily come aboard as you come home and shed your clothes that got wet walking to the boat. Moisture in a boat around here is really difficult to get rid of, and is more injurious to the boat than you would think. Turn you hanging locker into an "airing cupboard" in the old-fashioned English style, and make sure it is well ventilated, taking air from the cabin and exhausting it overboard when it's laden with moisture from the drying clothes. A fan from an old computer's power supply in the cat's pajamas for the purpose.

So you see, there is nothing particularly difficult or "foreign" about living aboard. You just have to think it through.

Good luck

TrentePieds
TrentePieds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 11:10   #21
Senior Cruiser
 
newhaul's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: puget sound washington
Boat: 1968 Islander bahama 24 hull 182, 1963 columbia 29 defender. hull # 60
Posts: 9,263
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andromeda1947 View Post
Has anybody here lived aboard a tiny sailboat before? I'm talking between 20-26 feet. If so, how was it and how did you dealt with the cramp space?

I know ideally you would want a larger boat (28 foot or greater), but I'm currently looking at getting one in Australia and it seems like there's not a lot of sailboats here like in the States. The whole idea right now is to use it to live on it here by Melbourne while I work and when I'm not working, taking it out sailing to build up experience. (I've skippered 420s, Lasers, and crewed on a 22 foot boat as well as a 65 foot.) My plan then would be to sell it in around five years and get a much larger one for Blue Water sailing and go out into the Pacific and see where it takes me.

As much as I would love to get a larger boat (28 or 30 foot) to live on, there doesn't seem to be many here in Australia which are within my budget.
welcome aboard .
I lived for several years on my islander bahama 24 . Ran a small dorm fridge on a small inverter charged with 200 watts solar . The biggest issue for me was the headroom issue.
The home designed dodger over the companionway really helped .
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCI0053.jpg
Views:	94
Size:	444.0 KB
ID:	191469   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCI0056.jpg
Views:	94
Size:	429.1 KB
ID:	191470  

__________________
Non illigitamus carborundum
newhaul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 11:11   #22
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 186
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

Hello,

I was a full time student both working fulltime and as a student living on a Catalina 25 for 7 years. Warm water for showers, I submerged 200' of hose in 6' of water that keep the temp the same year round. Attached to a PVC pipe with shower fitting and had a great shower year round. Never had AC or fridge and managed just fine. I could be ready to sail in <15 mins. No problems.....you can do it if your mindset was committed.

GC
glcalahan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 11:26   #23
Registered User
 
nwdiver's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Vancouver, BC
Boat: C&C Landfall 38
Posts: 733
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

As noted above there is a big difference between a Cal 20 and the 20 ft Flicka......young, single, on the docks a 24 foot exracing boat.....if your working on the docks don't jump too soon, get a room in a share house for a few months and find a livable small boat......
nwdiver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 12:06   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Panama City Beach, FL
Boat: Beneteau 343
Posts: 430
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

I recently met a couple who were living aboard and cruising on a Bayfield 26. She is of average build; he is a big boy. Their Bayfield is roomy for a 26 footer but it is hard for me to imagine it. They are making it work somehow.
EmeraldCoastSailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 12:30   #25
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2011
Boat: Leisure 23SL
Posts: 26
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

I'm in the low 40s and I enjoy some weeks/ a few months every summer on my Leisure 23SL and a few days every now and then (when I have work assignements close to the marina & weekends). I have standing headroom, heating for winter, fridge (not really needed), alcohol stove; showers and toilet and a good restaurant are provided by marina.
I agree that it's hard to keep an unwrinkled suit in such a small boat but it's doable. Space is minimum but enough for a lot of things.

So not really liveaboarding, but if I'd give up my suits and library I could really live much longer aboard. If warm enough outside it might be for years. I love the small space inside, cleaning is so much easier, everything has its place etc.

Be sure to have standing headroom though. It's what kept me apart from camping.
__________________
Sailing a Leisure 23SL in Black Sea
ghrt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 12:46   #26
Registered User
 
captmikem's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Pacific NW.
Boat: KP 46
Posts: 642
Images: 2
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

I lived aboard a columbia 26 with a woman, two dogs, and two parrots for a couple of years. We cruised all through the Bahamas, and the keys. No engine so we had more space and sharpened my sailing skills. It was fine, plenty of room if you kept things simple. Had a car 12v battery for lights, the vhf and an HF reciever. Charged it ashore every couple of weeks.
Actually it was a bunch of fun.
M
captmikem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 13:27   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Naples, FL
Boat: 1976 Morgan O.I. 28
Posts: 7
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

Maybe you could come here to the USA and sail back to Australia on your affordable boat. Just a thought.
mjaymc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 14:48   #28
Registered User
 
Ramona's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NSW Australia
Boat: Currawong 30 - Ramona
Posts: 156
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andromeda1947 View Post
Has anybody here lived aboard a tiny sailboat before? I'm talking between 20-26 feet. If so, how was it and how did you dealt with the cramp space?

I know ideally you would want a larger boat (28 foot or greater), but I'm currently looking at getting one in Australia and it seems like there's not a lot of sailboats here like in the States. The whole idea right now is to use it to live on it here by Melbourne while I work and when I'm not working, taking it out sailing to build up experience. (I've skippered 420s, Lasers, and crewed on a 22 foot boat as well as a 65 foot.) My plan then would be to sell it in around five years and get a much larger one for Blue Water sailing and go out into the Pacific and see where it takes me.

As much as I would love to get a larger boat (28 or 30 foot) to live on, there doesn't seem to be many here in Australia which are within my budget.



Actually this country is awash with yachts for sale in that size for ridiculous prices. They are hard to sell as most people think of starter boats as 40 footers etc. For comfortable living I would suggest as a minimum standing headroom. That Cole 26 that just sold in Melbourne off eBay would have been perfect for you. Keep an eye out on eBay for yachts that Maxiyachts sells. Living onboard is pretty much frowned upon in this country but you can get away with it if you don't attract attention to yourself. No hanging out washing etc and keep your boat tidy.
Ramona is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 15:06   #29
Senior Cruiser
 
newhaul's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: puget sound washington
Boat: 1968 Islander bahama 24 hull 182, 1963 columbia 29 defender. hull # 60
Posts: 9,263
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

If you are willing to sail it back and get your own outboard I will give you my old islander .
It has sailed to Hawaii and back stateside .
The gladiator that Robin Graham Sailed around the world is a copy of my boat.
__________________
Non illigitamus carborundum
newhaul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2019, 15:26   #30
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Northeast Harbor, Maine
Boat: Cape Dory 31
Posts: 177
Re: Living Aboard a Tiny Sailboat

Back in the 80s I was single and often lived on my Bristol 26 for a month or more at a time. Standing headroom if you're not too tall (I'm 5'10"), decent storage and outboard in a well. Very simple rig to sail. Wide double berth in the saloon if you fold down the dinette (some models just had two conventional berths in the saloon). Also known as Sailstar 26. 234 were built and some may be in Australia.

I also liked the Bristol 24, a.k.a. Sailstar Corsair. This boat was far more popular than the 26 (800 built), is an able little cruiser and is the prettier of the two. It is also available as an inboard.

If there are models you decide you like, google to see if there is an owners' association. This can be a good source of boats for sale in Australia that may not be on the open market. Also good places to find good used gear cheap.

I preferred moorings when I could get them. Cheaper and quieter in blows (no nearby boats squeaking on their fenders). Jenn and I now live aboard on our Cape Dory 31 in Maine all summer and prefer a mooring, but we are in a pretty well sheltered harbor. The mooring is part of a nice marina with good services. We do keep a lot of stuff in the car, and this summer may even rent a small storage locker and also use it for some winter storage.

Good luck. If you can find a decent boat, living aboard has its unique pleasures, including simplicity and sailing only when the wind is good.

Jenn and Terry
__________________
Jenn & Terry
North Conway, New Hampshire
Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
jen1722terry is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
boat, living aboard, sail, sailboat

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tiny, Affordable Living TropicalPenguin Boat Ownership & Making a Living 30 22-10-2016 20:00
New to Living Aboard a Sailboat in Chesapeake and Hoping for Suggestions slipslidingaway Liveaboard's Forum 9 06-04-2014 17:38
Make a Living, Living Aboard JanetGroene Boat Ownership & Making a Living 0 19-11-2010 12:28
Living Aboard in Ft. Myers Area (Sailboat) katiekates Liveaboard's Forum 25 23-04-2008 21:00
Tiny woman on small yellow boat s/vAngel Meets & Greets 27 18-01-2007 21:54

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:52.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.