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Old 29-06-2017, 08:10   #46
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

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Originally Posted by softdown View Post
One should not buy a fixer upper if they plan to have a boat yard fix it up. The original poster is exceptionally handy.

I am constantly amazed by the internet throngs who wile away hours and days at forums. Yet can't be bothered with reading backgrounds or using words instead of esoteric abbreviations. Not to mention those who don't bother with grammar because "I'm on a phone". The real "princes", of course, are those who do not bother with paragraphs.
Maybe us "internet throngs" are too busy out cruising full-time and enjoying ourselves, instead of wasting away the years fixing up some old beater boat in a yard (dry storage boat graveyard) or marina.
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Old 29-06-2017, 08:37   #47
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

My opinion: SKipMac's answer is good. A boat like that is going to be a project. How ready are you for that? It's amazing how many things need done a boat you buy that is "ready to use".... much less one that is sitting for 8 years.
Many things are not evident: Fuel bad in tanks, tanks may even be bad, leaks from drying out too much, bad shaft corroded inside the cutlass bearing, etc etc etc.
You may solve these readily, just saying don't be surprised if you need to spend a year or two making the boat ready.
People can get on each others nerves in a small space. Only you can decide if your family is the type that can get along well in that environment. It may be fine. If the kids are of a mindset to do it for the adventure then you can be fine.
I would:
-Get a boat that has a separate berth area for each child. They need their own space at that age, not just a settee to sleep on.
-It sounds like you are weighing buying real estate or taking a derelict boat. That's a bit of a diverse choice.
-If you can buy real estate...Buy a boat that needs little done with the right space for you.
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Old 29-06-2017, 08:39   #48
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenomac View Post
Maybe us "internet throngs" are too busy out cruising full-time and enjoying ourselves, instead of wasting away the years fixing up some old beater boat in a yard (dry storage boat graveyard) or marina.
The condition of the boat was unknown. The boat was no longer sailed because the owner passed away, not because of a known problem that renders it unsailable. Exceptionally handy people always buy fixer-uppers. Always.

An Oyster 53 owner passing judgement on interest in a 60s vintage 33' boat? I don't think you can truly relate to the mindset of people of normal living standards. Nice boat though...congrats on that.
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Old 29-06-2017, 08:59   #49
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

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Originally Posted by softdown View Post
An Oyster 53 owner passing judgement on interest in a 60s vintage 33' boat? I don't think you can truly relate to the mindset of people of normal living standards. Nice boat though...congrats on that.

It's not passing judgment as such and what do you know about the mans prior sailboat history and prior experiences?!

My first sailboat was an Albin Vega.
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Old 29-06-2017, 09:42   #50
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

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Originally Posted by softdown View Post

An Oyster 53 owner passing judgement on interest in a 60s vintage 33' boat? I don't think you can truly relate to the mindset of people of normal living standards. Nice boat though...congrats on that.
FWI

1. Our first boat was an 11ft Kite.

2. Second boat was a 1960's O'Day 20 major fixer upper that needed everything.... which I did myself including Awlgripping the hull.

3. Third boat was a Hunter 450

4. Our present boat an Oyster 53 which required yours truly to refinish the decks.... Something YOU most likely can't do.

But what do you care.... your stereotyping has already been decided.
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Old 29-06-2017, 11:51   #51
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

I enjoy projects and upgrades. The fact that some succeed and others don't doesn't seem to be as relevant to the single individual's motivation as compared to their funds. It's long been my thought that most project boats that don't make it to the finish line are a results of the unexpected costs that come with the renovation.
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Old 29-06-2017, 20:34   #52
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

If you have family support (particularly your spouse) your are already ahead of most folks who are interested in such a thing.

As you describe it, your situation seems ideal....BUT don't make a "dead" boat your first boat. This may put a bad taste in everyone's mouth before you're done.

Thumbs up from me except you should Spend 15k on the same Morgan but 20 years newer and find one that's already a live aboard.
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Old 29-06-2017, 21:02   #53
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

I thought the OP's original question was if a family of 4 could enjoy a 34 foot sailboat. The answer is a definite YES.

BUT... the OP also mentioned an abandoned Morgan 34 to rebuild. That is a definite MISTAKE. Old boats are cheap. Why not buy one that's ready to go for a lot less money (and zero time) than fixing up someone else's problem. Yes, you can buy 40 year old sailboats that are in decent shape for next to nothing. There are few people out there interested in 40 year old sailboats. Most people want NEW, or at most 25 years old. But you can definitely buy an older boat that is ready to sail...I've done it. I paid $100 for a pretty nice boat in Toronto that just needed a ton of cleaning. I paid the man, spent the rest of the day getting organized, and sailed home 150 miles with my 2 small kids. It was a ton of fun. A couple years later we did it again.

SO...don't take on a huge project boat. DO get a decent boat and go sailing with your family.
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Old 29-06-2017, 22:40   #54
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

Go ! Go now ! Don't look back. Don't care about what anyone thinks. If your wife,and family are on board, go. You will regret not trying, more than doing. Dry land is going no where. I started dreaming about a life at sea at 14,after reading Rich man Poor man. Pulled the trigger at 50. Don't make my mistake, and listen to the doubters. Your kids will learn more at sea,than they ever will in school. Make the jump. I've been at sea for 7 years. 3 hurricanes, no telling how many tropical storms, and been run over by a waterspout. You can see the video at YouTube: Davis Island thunderstorm on a sailboat. Turned out to be a waterspout according to the police officer I talked to after. I doubt this opportunity will ever reappear. Good luck,and fair winds !
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Old 30-06-2017, 03:57   #55
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

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Originally Posted by BrightSEALAB View Post
I've read posts from people about small liveaboard situations. I'm curious about the experiences who have done this with a family.

My situation, as succinctly as I might put it. I have a wife and two kids(11 and 13). We live in a small house (700 sq. ft.) and have room to spare. We're not big and we're not terribly indoor-active.

My wife has been pushing me to buy a vacation home in Florida (an idea I'm not fond of) so I suggested we look into a largish sailboat instead to put into a marina some part of the year and use in the same way. To my surprise she's totally on board, eager even.

And now, since I've been talking about this as a possibility, an uncle who owns a self storage facility in Savannah has offered me a Morgan 34 he has in covered storage. The owner died 8 or 9 years ago, nobody wanted it and eventually the probate court signed the title over to my uncle. A year ago, he was going to sell it to a guy and let the guy tinker with it while the man came up with the cash, but instead, the guy took the engine out and tore it down then decided not to buy it. On my last visit I bought a new head gasket and put the engine back together and got it to run on a pallet. It seems to run fine. I'm reasonably sure I can figure out how to get the engine back up into the boat.

Cutting to the chase I guess ... It's a damn pretty boat. I want it to work out for us but if I screw this up the first time, convincing the family to try again will be that much harder. Also,I think it would strain my extended family ties if I were to take this thing then turn around and sell it a year later. I'm not sure why that should be ... but that's kind of how my family is.
  1. Is it really too small?
  2. 2 adults and 2 tweens for 4 to 8 weeks at a time? Maybe longer?
  3. If the consensus is really that it's just too small, is there a way to throw money at the problem? We were budgeting to buy in 2019 with $15-20k to spend. This option is near free and I could throw $5-10k at it this year if that would make it more habitable. I know the laws of physics determine how much room is in the boat, but maybe someone knows the secret?
  4. The boat is all there but it's completely unrigged... derigged... I don't know what you call it but I'm certain everyone here knows exactly what I mean. If I want to get a quote for someone to put the mast and such back up, what do I call that? Ballpark of what I should expect someone to charge me for this?
  5. I'm not a complete neophyte, as a teenage I would crew a friends yacht on the mackinaw race out of Chicago every summer, but it's been a while. This doesn't look like too much boat. Am I wrong?
  6. Kind of veering off the liveaboard theme (sorry) but overall impressions on this boat's reputation? It's a 1969 Morgan 34 with shoal draft. There is a crate in this storage unit with literally hundreds of empty rum bottles from the Bahamas to Turks.

If I'm courting disaster, trying to pack this many people into this thing, I want to know. I will put it off and keep to the plan of finding something bigger. On the other hand, this would move that date up by more than a year.

Thank you all so much in advance. I'm sorry I don't know how to organize this question better, it's run a bit long as it is.
I have a 40 ft that is spacious, sturdy and safe and sails well now. Is one of six custom boats made in Miami in 1980. Was never fully finished. There is no old construction involved only a few minor projects left and some fun ones left to do to really kit it out in comfort. Dry clean boat everywhere. It's on dry dock w storage paid thru October. I plan to finish out. A few of the systems and do a fresh bottom paint on it. Install bow and stern rails and stanchions w life lines. A dual anchor mount and some anchor locker finishing touches and a bit of interior work before I consider selling it., it's my baby project and actually want to see it all the way through at least to the point of a few basic interior finishes on the functionality and redo the electric panel ready to fit it w a wind solar Inverter agm set up.. again this is all clean outfitting not dealing with dirty work..big difference.
Only mentioning as it is a heck of a boat now and in 6 months can be well further along fitted for comfort at a price you won't find for the space and sailing comfort.
I may be in position to leave the project and have to put it off to another time and another arduous boat search for the right one ya know..
Stay in touch. What is your timeline?
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Old 30-06-2017, 04:14   #56
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

Ah, yes..
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Old 30-06-2017, 04:25   #57
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

sounds like you've got "the bug".
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Old 30-06-2017, 04:39   #58
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

i got into sailing in similar fashion 5 years ago in Hamilton Ontario. I asked for and was given a 1970, abandoned, 17' project boat on a trailer. other than a hull and deck in fine shape, it had nothing. I spent the next 10 months refurbishing and refitting both the boat and trailer. paint inside and out. all new gunnel, cockpit combing, cabin, and transom woodwork. new windows. new mast, boom, and sails. new axle and tires and trailer lights. paint the trailer. cost me around $4000. I loved every minute of it! seeing the finished boat float for the first time in 25 years was an amazing feeling! you should be able to search for my project video on YouTube under "Newbridge Topaz". After 2 years of sailing, I sold it for $3200 and bought a 26' trailer sailer for $3500. Three years later I'm selling it and moving up to 29'.
You will undoubtedly spend more than you think on this Morgan project. You won't likely get all your money back out of it when you sell it. but perhaps like me, the experience will be worth every penny.
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Old 30-06-2017, 04:45   #59
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

Pretty sure the OP has posted he is going to pass on this boat (just in case some are trying to win the thread)
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Old 30-06-2017, 05:02   #60
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Re: Family of 4 in a Small Liveaboard, Courting Disaster?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrightSEALAB View Post
I've read posts from people about small liveaboard situations. I'm curious about the experiences who have done this with a family.

My situation, as succinctly as I might put it. I have a wife and two kids(11 and 13). We live in a small house (700 sq. ft.) and have room to spare. We're not big and we're not terribly indoor-active.

My wife has been pushing me to buy a vacation home in Florida (an idea I'm not fond of) so I suggested we look into a largish sailboat instead to put into a marina some part of the year and use in the same way. To my surprise she's totally on board, eager even.

And now, since I've been talking about this as a possibility, an uncle who owns a self storage facility in Savannah has offered me a Morgan 34 he has in covered storage. The owner died 8 or 9 years ago, nobody wanted it and eventually the probate court signed the title over to my uncle. A year ago, he was going to sell it to a guy and let the guy tinker with it while the man came up with the cash, but instead, the guy took the engine out and tore it down then decided not to buy it. On my last visit I bought a new head gasket and put the engine back together and got it to run on a pallet. It seems to run fine. I'm reasonably sure I can figure out how to get the engine back up into the boat.

Cutting to the chase I guess ... It's a damn pretty boat. I want it to work out for us but if I screw this up the first time, convincing the family to try again will be that much harder. Also,I think it would strain my extended family ties if I were to take this thing then turn around and sell it a year later. I'm not sure why that should be ... but that's kind of how my family is.
  1. Is it really too small?
  2. 2 adults and 2 tweens for 4 to 8 weeks at a time? Maybe longer?
  3. If the consensus is really that it's just too small, is there a way to throw money at the problem? We were budgeting to buy in 2019 with $15-20k to spend. This option is near free and I could throw $5-10k at it this year if that would make it more habitable. I know the laws of physics determine how much room is in the boat, but maybe someone knows the secret?
  4. The boat is all there but it's completely unrigged... derigged... I don't know what you call it but I'm certain everyone here knows exactly what I mean. If I want to get a quote for someone to put the mast and such back up, what do I call that? Ballpark of what I should expect someone to charge me for this?
  5. I'm not a complete neophyte, as a teenage I would crew a friends yacht on the mackinaw race out of Chicago every summer, but it's been a while. This doesn't look like too much boat. Am I wrong?
  6. Kind of veering off the liveaboard theme (sorry) but overall impressions on this boat's reputation? It's a 1969 Morgan 34 with shoal draft. There is a crate in this storage unit with literally hundreds of empty rum bottles from the Bahamas to Turks.

If I'm courting disaster, trying to pack this many people into this thing, I want to know. I will put it off and keep to the plan of finding something bigger. On the other hand, this would move that date up by more than a year.

Thank you all so much in advance. I'm sorry I don't know how to organize this question better, it's run a bit long as it is.
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