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Old 18-11-2018, 21:03   #331
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

It look to me like “Bind” is only available through an employer, not available for individual, private purchase.
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Old 06-12-2018, 09:15   #332
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

I just received notice of a FREE webinaire via the SSCA online school. I assume this means you don’t need to be a SSCA member. Anyway, following up on all our discussions here, I thought some of you might want to check it out.

https://www.ssca.org/content.aspx?pa...dule_id=270250
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Old 06-12-2018, 11:18   #333
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

BTW - I signed up for my 2019 ACA health plan the other day. It's going cost my wife and I $27 for the year, $1000 deductible for tests, no copay at primary doctor, $5 copay specialist, generic drugs free. If we get a physical each year the insurance pays us $50/ea. If we get our Flu shots they pay us $25/ea. If we do the survey they get $25/ea. So if we do all that "normal" stuff they pay us $200.

If other USers want to know how to do it search my user name and there will be more than enough to point you how to do it because I'm not typing it again.
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Old 24-01-2021, 05:33   #334
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

“The World’s Best Places to Retire in 2021" ~ Global Retirement Index
The International Living “Annual Global Retirement Index” may be the most comprehensive and in-depth survey of its kind. The index is based on feedback from US expats, and ranks the leading nations for retirees according to 10 factors that include cost of living, climate, healthcare, entertainment and how easy it is to obtain residency. Click or scroll through the top 25 countries to retire to in 2021 and start planning that post-work move.
1. Costa Rica
“... Once you have acquired your residency, you pay approximately 7% to 11% of your reported monthly income into the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social healthcare system (Caja for short) and the national medical program is available to you without pre-existing exclusions or age disallowance. Residents have the option to blend public healthcare with private medical care either through out-of-pocket self-insuring or with the purchase of insurance policies. You can purchase these through familiar names like Blue Cross/Blue Shield, CIGNA, Aetna, or a Costa Rican private policy. All at a fraction of the cost compared to the U.S. You will find three JCI accredited private hospitals in the San José area, as well as numerous private clinics throughout the country. The public system has over 29 hospitals and nearly 250 regional clinics, making it easy to find healthcare no matter where you choose to settle.
A couple can live comfortably, but not necessarily extravagantly, here for around $2,000 a month. This includes renting a two-bedroom home with North American amenities, air conditioning, plus groceries, entertainment, transportation, and healthcare. If your monthly budget is closer to $2,500 to $3,000, you will find a relaxed lifestyle with every comfort you require ...”
2. Panama
3. Mexico
4. Colombia
5. Portugal
Much morehttps://internationalliving-magazine...AaAiGvEALw_wcB
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Old 27-01-2021, 04:13   #335
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

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I live in Canada, and here health care is FREE.
I think that the USA is the only country in the First World that does not provide free public health care to help cure people.

But you have a great military.
There is no such thing are "free" healthcare...you are paying somewhere.
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Old 27-01-2021, 04:27   #336
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

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I am 61 and live overseas. I got health insurance through Allianz for Expats. I also considered Cigna for Expats. I went with $20K deductable per year with annual max of $3MM for Latin America only. It cost $212 per month. I am a USA citizen and my country of domicile is Guatemala. Health is good and dirt cheap in Gautemala if the procedure is available for what the problem is. Most things can be done in Guatemala. I prefer being treated in Guatemala versus the USA. Had I included the USA the cost would have been $280 a month. I did not got coverage in the USA because Obama Care by laws covers all citizens regardless of pre-existing conditions. Therefore, I can get covered in the USA if I get sick and want to get treated in the USA. All I have to do is establish a residence(rent a cheap apartment), and I will have health insurance and by the 1rst of the following month. The maximum out of pocket per Obama care is aprox. $7K. Allianz covers for emergencies while traveling any where in the world so worst case I would be covered by Allianz until by USA health insurance covered me within a few weeks.

The Alliance policy includes $400 towards physical exam and related tests annually.

Cigna expat you have a choice of the whole world or the whole world excluding the USA. For me the 20K deductible with 1MM annual max for the whole world was $278 per month. Excluding the USA the cost is $230 per month but there is not $400 per year for physical exams, etc. The $1MM max per year is not enough for some things.

My approach is to be covered for the big hit and since health care is dirt cheap and quite good for most things in Guatemala, I don't mind paying for everything until $20K out of pocket.

You can play around with the annual deductible and annual max to suit your needs with Cigna and Allianz Expat.

With Cigna and Allianz Expat the cost of health care in your country of domicile determines what the premium is. Cigna and Allianz don't cover pre-existing conditions.

So when you retire in a year if you move and make your Country of Domicile a country with good but inexpensive health care you will be all set.

My wife and I spend about 6 months year in Guatemala and travel / sail the rest of the time.

I think there are companies that offer insurance to people the travel constantly. I am not sure if Allianz or Cigna offer that kind of coverage. I suggest you ask them. Both are good companies.
I have a very similar plan only with Portugal instead of Guatemala. Policy premiums are reasonable, coverage is good, quality of care is high and cost of care is low. Between the unfunded mandate to provide care regardless of ability to pay and employer provided health policy.....the U.S. system is all screwed up and the GOV help (i.e. ACA) just makes it worse.
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Old 27-01-2021, 05:01   #337
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

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I live in Canada, and here health care is FREE.
I think that the USA is the only country in the First World that does not provide free public health care to help cure people.

But you have a great military.
Yeah, but if you have insurance, we don't get put on waiting lists for surgery.
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Old 27-01-2021, 08:17   #338
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

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Yeah, but if you have insurance, we don't get put on waiting lists for surgery.
Wow, so there are infinite resources so everyone can have everything they want at the snap of finger? That's one impressive system you have down there .

Lets get real. Everyone waits some of the time. It's true the wait times tend to be shorter for non-urgent care in the USA, but only IF you have money or insurance. For those without, well, good luck...

Here's a short analysis which looks at the question.

Comparing Health Care in Canada to the U.S.
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Old 27-01-2021, 08:17   #339
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

An old thread but dear to my heart (or should I say wallet).

We are much closer to needing inexpensive healthcare when we start full time cruising this year.

Being that we are now in 2021 let's update the options.
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Old 30-01-2021, 11:23   #340
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

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An old thread but dear to my heart (or should I say wallet).



We are much closer to needing inexpensive healthcare when we start full time cruising this year.



Being that we are now in 2021 let's update the options.
The options are in general pretty easy...avoid healthcare in the USA...almost anywhere else in the world is less expensive and less hassle.

Just took my wife to the ER here in Panama yesterday...doc exam, some tests, etc...$7.50 grand total. That is if course at a public hospital, but it is a nice facility and its only a few blocks away.
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Old 01-02-2021, 16:02   #341
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

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Wow, so there are infinite resources so everyone can have everything they want at the snap of finger? That's one impressive system you have down there .

Lets get real. Everyone waits some of the time. It's true the wait times tend to be shorter for non-urgent care in the USA, but only IF you have money or insurance. For those without, well, good luck...

Here's a short analysis which looks at the question.

Comparing Health Care in Canada to the U.S.
I've never waited for surgery in the US and so far, I've had a lot. The last surgery I had, I fell and busted by bursar sack in my elbow. I had surgery a week after I decided I needed it, under anesthesia. I had a cyst taken out of my neck, that again required anesthesia and being put under, that was just annoying me, on about the same timeline. When I was diagnosed with cancer, I had surgery the day after they found the tumor, to have it removed.

On the other hand, last time we were in the Bahamas, we became friends with a cruising couple from Canada. She limped everywhere she went and finally we asked her about it. Her leg needed surgery, but it was declared not essential, I guess, and she was put on a waiting list. After two years of postponing their Bahamas trip, they just said screw it, we're going and will get it fixed when we get back.

They told us of dozens of case of Canadians they knew who had just got tired of waiting, gone to the US and paid out of pocket. They wanted to sink their money in a boat and a trip instead.

I know the medical system works better in the US for people who plan ahead and pay for good insurance, than the people who don't. I know the Canadian system would seem to work better for people who can't or won't do that, than it does for the people who could or would plan for a better way.

That always seems to be the way with everything socialized, medicine included. Bringing down the level of care (or whatever) for everyone seems to be regarded as the next best thing to bringing it up for everyone.

No system is perfect, but I have no complaints about the medical system in the US. Having had cancer twice here in the US, and having been cured and survived both times, I nevertheless less imagine, that I'd be dead already, if I had lived in a whole lot of other countries.

But, I assume that Canadians are happy with their system or they'd get another one. I'm happy with ours, but I guess someone isn't, so we'll have to ruin our system to make them happy.
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Old 01-02-2021, 16:26   #342
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

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...That always seems to be the way with everything socialized, medicine included. Bringing down the level of care (or whatever) for everyone seems to be regarded as the next best thing to bringing it up for everyone.
Anecdotes aside, you do realize that by almost every measure, the Canadian healthcare system beats the US. Outcomes are superior in general. We live longer, have fewer system-related complications, have a lower disease burden in general, and it costs about 1/2 the price. Oh, and no one has to worry about how to pay their healthcare or insurance bills.

I'm pleased you've had such excellent care. Indeed, the USA offers the best of the best for those who can afford it. But it's not a very good system when judged against peer countries.

Here's just one study. There's a huge amount of information about this:

U.S. Health Care from a Global Perspective, 2019: Higher Spending, Worse Outcomes?

Quote:
Highlights
  • The U.S. spends more on health care as a share of the economy — nearly twice as much as the average OECD country — yet has the lowest life expectancy and highest suicide rates among the 11 nations.
  • The U.S. has the highest chronic disease burden and an obesity rate that is two times higher than the OECD average.
  • Americans had fewer physician visits than peers in most countries, which may be related to a low supply of physicians in the U.S.
  • Americans use some expensive technologies, such as MRIs, and specialized procedures, such as hip replacements, more often than our peers.
  • The U.S. outperforms its peers in terms of preventive measures — it has the one of the highest rates of breast cancer screening among women ages 50 to 69 and the second-highest rate (after the U.K.) of flu vaccinations among people age 65 and older.
  • Compared to peer nations, the U.S. has among the highest number of hospitalizations from preventable causes and the highest rate of avoidable deaths.
And here's a nice summary document of health system data looking at the wealthiest countries.

https://www.commonwealthfund.org/sit...01-30-2020.pdf

I'm not trying to piss on the US healthcare system. But it's simply false to suggest it is better than the rest. By most measures, it is the worst.
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Old 01-02-2021, 17:09   #343
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

thread is off track into bricking. Cruiser and early retirees need info and options not battles about whose system etc. is better.
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Old 01-02-2021, 18:05   #344
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

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thread is off track into bricking. Cruiser and early retirees need info and options not battles about whose system etc. is better.
Agreed. I know everything I need to know about healthcare in the USA. I live here and am a small business owner and have researched health care literally every year since I became one. I need to know about healthcare - for me and my wife - everywhere ELSE, since that's where I'll be soon.

Thanks in advance to everyone who shares that knowledge with us International Sailor Noobs.
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Old 01-02-2021, 18:25   #345
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Re: Early retirement and health care for boaters

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Agreed. I know everything I need to know about healthcare in the USA. I live here and am a small business owner and have researched health care literally every year since I became one. I need to know about healthcare - for me and my wife - everywhere ELSE, since that's where I'll be soon.

Thanks in advance to everyone who shares that knowledge with us International Sailor Noobs.
Are you looking to purchase health insurance for being out of the country, or are you wondering about health care costs/availability/quality outside of the US? I've not had health insurance for outside of the states, so no ideas there. My experience from a long time ago (Bahamas, Eastern Caribbean, Trinidad, Venezuela, Bonaire) is that health care is of high quality (US and European trained medical professionals) and very very inexpensive. (I had a bad staph infection when we were in the Bahamas that required lancing and daily visits to the nurse for bandage changes (with antibiotics packed in there) for 2 weeks. At the end of the treatment period, I was (very apologetically) handed a bill for the full amount: $50. That was the tourist price, far more than what Bahamians would pay.)

If you're not familiar with the term medical tourism, you might want to investigate a bit as that might put your mind at ease about the quality of care outside of the US.
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