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Old 19-07-2020, 06:02   #16
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ixium View Post
For anyone doing way way future planning... PSHCP covers you out of Canada. Itís one of the reasons Iím at the job Iím at now.
Sorry but that ship has literally sailed. No way I would ever go back 30 years to restart my career in a different field so I could qualify for a Public Service insurance plan.
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Old 19-07-2020, 08:16   #17
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

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Originally Posted by Mike OReilly View Post
We've been cruising seasonally within Canada, but outside our home province, for about five years now. Montanan has quoted all the relevant details, but I believe you can maintain federal residence status pretty easily. Maintaining provincial health care status is harder.

As I understand it, you must be resident in the province for five months (153 days) of each 12-month period, so it's not just a question of making visits every 7 months. You need to physically in the province for 5 months.

There is provision to take a 2-year sabbatical, and I believe it is now possible to take multiple such sabbaticals through a process of renewal of eligibility, but the basic rule is you gotta be here 5 months of each periods to maintain eligibility.

Of note, this means being in the province (presumably Ontario), not just in Canada. As we know, healthcare is provincial, so it's not good enough to be 5 months in Canada. You gotta be 5 months in Ontario.

We use a relative as our mail forwarder. It has worked fine for us, but we've also diverted most of our mail to digital delivery. This gives us a permanent address so we can retain driver's licenses and health cards and all the other stuff that government requires fixed addresses for.
Mike is correct on the need for accumulating the requisite time of cumulative physical residence in your province per "year" [well at least as I understand provincial healthcare plans in administering several Canadian employees who are WFH status; my experience limited by being on the south side of the 49th].

A key kicker is that again as I understand the scheme for Ontario the "year" is a rolling year, not a calendar year, or a fiscal year. Thus it is rather like the Schengen countries visa which allows for up to a cumulative 90 days within ANY 180 day period, each day is the start of yet another rolling 180 day period.

"To retain their Canadian provincial healthcare, snowbirds must carefully monitor their absences from Canada. In Ontario, for example, maintaining OHIP coverage requires physical presence in the province for at least 153 days in ANY rolling 12-month period. In Quebec, to maintain RAMQ coverage, at least 183 days of physical presence in the province is required per CALENDAR year (though absences of 21 days or fewer don’t count)." https://www.advisor.ca/my-practice/c...for-canadians/

So check your provincial rules closely, Ontario requires 153 Days [not five months] of physical presence, whereas Quebec requires 183 Days presence [not six months] but they differ as to what the specific "year" period is. Besure you know what YEAR you are living in.

As to 2020, now that is a year we can hope to forget. In the future, the calendar references will be 2018, 2019, . . ., 2021, 2022. No I did not skip 2020, that will be a year we don't mention.

We can always tell during the fall and spring season that the benefit clock has rolled for Canadian Snowbirds what with the migration for spending some number of months up north. Typically two waves rolling through our 406 Territory of MontaŮa, seemingly tied around the beginning of a month as rental contracts are generally calendar months. It is like an extended rush hour on the interstate freeways. Heck we even take to avoiding shopping at Costco in Kalispell around those weeks because the Canadians stock up with loads of stuff on their way before crossing into Alberta. Please don't cause a run on our toilet paper supplies, we already have enough Covidiots disrupting the inventory.

The USA and Canada's immigration databases are now linked so that your to's and from's are known with great precision. Gone are the days of the rubber stamp in the passport being the sole data record, now it is electronic and real time. I suspect there are calendar apps or websites available for calculating your days. Heck the Schengen countries have this down so well that one can enter in your passport number and their database will tell you exactly how many days you have been in the territory during the last rolling 180 days. You need to tabulate your in residency days, which is much harder to do with a rolling time period of inclusion. Although the US government has an automated calculator for your use, reference link at the bottom of this post.

The rules for calculating Canadian permanent residence status for Federal purposes is as follows, I would suspect but again not certain that the same or somewhat similar rules would apply for provincial healthcare, but then this rule is Federal and y'all have provinces with their own tendencies and peculiarities, just like us crazy Yanks.

Each day of residence in Canada after lawful admission for permanent residence counts as one day.
February 29 (leap day) is not counted in either presence or absence.
Either the day the applicant leaves Canada or the day they return is considered an absence, but not both. If the applicant leaves Canada and comes back the same day, it is not considered an absence.

Seriously I would not be attempting to count days so as to be exactly the 153 days in ANY 12 MONTH PERIOD [be that a rolling year or a calendar year] as it applies specifically to Ontario; I recall meeting a distressed Canadian family headed northbound alongside the freeway in Montana and their vehicle had broken down and they indicating their absolute need to cross the border the following day to retain qualifying for benefits. I assisted them in getting their truck repaired and they were back on their way hauling their large fifth wheeled trailer towards the border for a night crossing. Geez, pad the clock with at least a few extra days in case a flight is cancelled, or you have a pandemic delay. And only the days you are physically present in Your province of residence count, not the days you are off walk abouting the rest of Canada. Y'all are supposed to retain permanent residency in your province and that means actually residing, head on pillow, butt on coach binge watching Netflix.

Also do realize that you could inadvertently invoke tax liability and / or tax reporting requirements within the country you are staying if you stay beyond a specific number of days in the foreign country, and / or extend your stay beyond the allowed visa time period.

How to Count Your Days in the USA Best days of your lives.

There are two different rules that Canadians need to understand.

U.S. Immigration allows Canadians to visit the U.S. for up to 182 days during any rolling 12-month period.

The Internal Revenue Agency [Yankee Tax Collectors], allows you to visit the U.S. for up to 182 days within a calendar year. How you calculate those 182 days is where it gets confusing. This calculation is called the Substantial Presence Test and factors in how many days you have spent in the U.S. during the past 3 years. If you exceed 180 days in the U.S. over 3 years, you need to file IRS Form 8840 to prove a closer connection to Canada and avoid paying US taxes. Reference: https://www.canadatoarizona.com/visi...alendar%20year.

Canada and US border protection now share information so that they know exactly when you enter and exit each country.

You can access your information online with your passport number with the online US Customs and Border Protection Calculator here:


https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/#/home

Both of the Big Brothers are watching you in real time! Don't let it become 183 days in a rolling or a calendar year, else the USA will be after y'all. Meaning that your reentry could be denied if you overstayed a prior visa free time period. Y'all would have to stay on your side of the border wall.

Do note that Canadians are allowed to enter without a visa and are granted the 182 days in a rolling year period, whereas other foreigners from visa waiver countries are granted 90 days or less. What can I say, we love you guys, and recognize that Canadian winters are long. You are special, eh?

All the best.

Dan
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Old 19-07-2020, 08:23   #18
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

Sickness or injury can become quite expensive, quite quickly in the USA.

Medical air evacuation gets you back to your home province ASAP.

I like MedJetAssist.com but there are others offering similar services.

I get a nice discount because I’m a member of the BMWMOA (BMW Motorcycle Owners of America).
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Old 19-07-2020, 09:26   #19
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

Become a migrant worker they are allowed to return to their home country and upon returning to Canada are imediately entitled to health care but if your a Canadian citizen and are outside the country for more than 7 months you will spend 3 months without health care
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Old 19-07-2020, 09:51   #20
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

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Originally Posted by NaClyDog View Post
Thanks.


This is basically the same our doctor said. He has us on yearly physicals but said he could work on your "availability" and still keep a routine.


One of the prescription meds I take is levothyroxine (supposedly cheap to buy out of pocket outside the US), have you had any issues getting your meds outside of Canada?
I take the same prescription. I haven't needed to buy out of country yet, we loaded up something like 6 or 8 months worth. I am back in Alberta with a month left, so we will stock up again.
We were in Bahamas when covid hit, and were locked down there for a couple months. There were people asking about prescriptions on vhf, and in most cases someone had extra of the same. Levothyroxine was actually a very common one. So I think it would be easy to source
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Old 19-07-2020, 12:12   #21
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

Canadian citizens currently sitting in North Carolina waiting for the Erie/Oswego canals to open to return home. However, my wife and I are now seriously considering taking up permanent residence in the beautiful community we find ourselves in.
While this thread has great info for those wishing to remain in Canada, I am very eager for info on living in the US year round.
What are the Canadian and US tax implications for Canadian pension income if one was to move to the US? Is the pension income taxed in Canada, the US or both?
What type of US "card" does one apply for? Surely not a green card as we will not be working.
Health care is a whole ball of wax on it's own and will be addressed upon confirmation of the tax implications.
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Old 19-07-2020, 12:14   #22
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

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Originally Posted by gkehoe View Post
Canadian citizens currently sitting in North Carolina waiting for the Erie/Oswego canals to open to return home. However, my wife and I are now seriously considering taking up permanent residence in the beautiful community we find ourselves in.
While this thread has great info for those wishing to remain in Canada, I am very eager for info on living in the US year round.
What are the Canadian and US tax implications for Canadian pension income if one was to move to the US? Is the pension income taxed in Canada, the US or both?
What type of US "card" does one apply for? Surely not a green card as we will not be working.
Health care is a whole ball of wax on it's own and will be addressed upon confirmation of the tax implications.
Nothing personal but that's a whole other kettle of fish. Would you mind starting your own thread?
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Old 19-07-2020, 12:40   #23
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gkehoe View Post
Canadian citizens currently sitting in North Carolina waiting for the Erie/Oswego canals to open to return home. However, my wife and I are now seriously considering taking up permanent residence in the beautiful community we find ourselves in.
While this thread has great info for those wishing to remain in Canada, I am very eager for info on living in the US year round.
What are the Canadian and US tax implications for Canadian pension income if one was to move to the US? Is the pension income taxed in Canada, the US or both?
What type of US "card" does one apply for? Surely not a green card as we will not be working.
Health care is a whole ball of wax on it's own and will be addressed upon confirmation of the tax implications.
If you wish to reside permanently in the USA you indeed need to be granted a "Greencard". It is not just a work visa, there are separate and distinct types of work visas. They are not as easy to get as they once were, i.e. before DJT / #45.

Having a Green Card (officially known as a Permanent Resident Card) allows you to live and work permanently in the United States. The steps you must take to apply for a Green Card will vary depending on your individual situation.

Before starting the application process, there are two questions that you should answer first:

Reference here: https://www.uscis.gov/green-card


1. Are you eligible to apply?

U.S. immigration laws provide a variety of ways for people to apply for a Green Card. The eligibility requirements may vary depending on the immigrant category you are applying under. Go to our Green Card Eligibility Categories to see all the possible categories you can apply under and what the eligibility requirements are.

Being Sponsored for a Green Card
Most people who apply for a Green Card will need to complete at least two forms—an immigrant petition and a Green Card application (Form I-485). Someone else usually must file the petition for you (often referred to as sponsoring or petitioning for you), although you may be eligible to file for yourself in some cases. Here are the most common forms:

Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative
Form I-140, Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker
Form I-730, Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition
Form I-589, Application for Asylum and for Withholding of Removal
Other petitions include:

Form I-360, Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er), or Special Immigrant
Form I-526, Immigrant Petition by Alien Entrepreneur
Form I-918, Petition of U Nonimmigrant Status
Form I-929, Petition for Qualifying Family Member of a U-1 Nonimmigrant
Refer to your eligibility category to see if you need a petition.

2. Are you inside or outside the United States?

If you are eligible to apply for a Green Card, you then need to determine which process to use – adjustment of status or consular processing.

The steps you must take to apply for a Green Card will vary depending on your individual situation. However, here is the general application process that most applicants will go through:

Someone usually must file an immigrant petition for you (often referred to as sponsoring or petitioning for you). In some cases, you may be eligible to file for yourself.
After the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service / USCIS approves the immigrant petition, and there is a visa that is available in your quota category, you file either a Green Card application with USCIS or a visa application with the U.S. Department of State.
You go to a biometrics appointment to provide fingerprints, photos, and a signature.
You go to an interview.
You receive a decision on your application.

Top 4 Ways Canadians Can Acquire a U.S. Green Card

Family Green Card
Canadian citizens with relatives who are U.S. citizens may be able to obtain a green card if certain and specific relationships exist. Different categories of relatives dictate whether, and how soon, you can get a green card.

One category is known as “immediate relatives,” which includes: 1) spouses of U.S. citizens; 2) parents of U.S. citizens who are over 21; and 3) children of U.S. citizens who are under 21. Any Canadian citizen who falls under one of these categories are immediately eligible for a green card without having to wait for an immigrant visa to become available based on a priority date. Assuming that the application process goes smoothly, a Canadian citizen can anticipate receiving a green card within one year of filing the application.

If you do not fall into one of the “immediate relative” categories, do not despair. There are other categories known as “family preference categories” which may still allow a relative to petition for a green card on your behalf. These relationships include: 1) unmarried sons or daughters (over 21) of U.S. citizens; 2) married children of U.S. citizens who are of any age; 3) brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens who are over 21; and 4) spouses or children of U.S. green card holders. Unfortunately, individuals born in Canada seeking a green card under a family preference category will have to wait several years before a visa becomes available [constrained by annual quotas]. If you are looking to obtain a green card through this route, you may want to explore other options – including marriage to a U.S. citizen, investing in an EB-5 green card [investor's greencard], or obtaining a green card through employment.

Marriage Green Card
A Canadian citizen who has married a U.S. citizen is generally entitled to apply for permanent residency. The U.S. citizen spouse will file a form known as “Petition for Alien Relative” with the USCIS, petitioning for the Canadian spouse to become a U.S. permanent resident. As part of the petition, the U.S. citizen will also have to sign an affidavit of support, declaring that he/she will be financially able to support the Canadian citizen and that he/she will not be a public charge. In other words, the U.S. citizen spouse is declaring that he/she can support his/her spouse so that the spouse does not become a burden to society by way of collecting unemployment insurance etc.

The Canadian citizen spouse may concurrently file a form known as an Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, seeking to change the Canadian’s current immigration status to that of a permanent resident. Depending on the Canadian’s situation, he/she may also apply for a temporary work permit or a temporary travel permit. These are optional, and should only be sought if the Canadian citizen is not currently on a valid work visa or anticipates that the work visa will expire before the green card is approved. The Canadian citizen will also have to get fingerprinted and undergo a medical examination by a designated civil surgeon to ensure that he/she is healthy – again, so as not to become a public charge.

Employment Green Card
You can apply for a green card (permanent residence) based on the fact that you have a permanent employment opportunity in the United States, or if an employer that wants to sponsor you for a green card based on permanent employment in the United States. Canadian citizens who are working for a US employer on a valid work visa may adjust their status to a permanent resident if the employer files an employment-based petition.

The wait time for employment-based green card petitions are based on “priority dates.” This is a method of cross-referencing a beneficiary’s country of birth and the employment-based category to determine whether a visa is currently available and, if not, how long the wait is. An individual born in Canada seeking an employment-based green card is generally in a better position compared to citizens of other countries, such as China, India, Mexico or the Philippines. This is because the priority dates for those born in Canada under an EB-1 and EB-2 visas are all “current.” This means that a visa is available for them immediately and that their petitions will not be backlogged.

Investor Green Card $$$$$$$ A.k.a. The Greenback Card. You literally buy your way to USA residency. Who says money doesn't talk?
Entrepreneurs (and their spouses and unmarried children under 21) who make an investment in a commercial enterprise in the United States and who plan to create or preserve ten permanent full time jobs for qualified United States workers, are eligible to apply for a green card.

Up to 10,000 visas may be authorized each fiscal year for eligible entrepreneurs.

You must invest $1,800,000, or at least $900,000 USD in a targeted employment area (high unemployment or rural area). In return, USCIS may grant conditional permanent residence to the individual.
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Old 19-07-2020, 12:44   #24
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

Please take it to a different thread.
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Old 19-07-2020, 12:57   #25
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris mac View Post
I take the same prescription. I haven't needed to buy out of country yet, we loaded up something like 6 or 8 months worth. I am back in Alberta with a month left, so we will stock up again.
We were in Bahamas when covid hit, and were locked down there for a couple months. There were people asking about prescriptions on vhf, and in most cases someone had extra of the same. Levothyroxine was actually a very common one. So I think it would be easy to source
FYI. For reference: Levothyroxine, 90 tablets, 60 mg will cost $31 to $32 with a GoodRx coupon at Walgreens or Walmart in the USA. Just go to GoodRx website and download a coupon or use their app on your phone.
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Old 19-07-2020, 12:58   #26
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

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Originally Posted by NaClyDog View Post
Please take it to a different thread.
Question asked and answered.
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Old 19-07-2020, 13:22   #27
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

We had to arrange for mail forwarding when we relocated our business in Canada, very simple process and excellent service. I contacted my Canadian assistant for guidance.

FYI.

Canada Post mail forwarding service.
Reference link.
https://www.canadapost.ca/tools/pg/m...-e.asp#1389190

What Is a Mail Forwarding service?

The Mail Forwarding service ensures that mail is delivered to a new or temporary address anywhere in Canada or the world when a business or residential customer moves, relocates, or wants the service for another reason. The service can be purchased online or at a post office.

There are two Mail Forwarding service types that are available:

Customers not returning to the old address must buy the Mail Forwarding for Moves. Mail delivery resumes to the old address upon service expiry. It is the customerís responsibility to notify correspondents of the new mailing address.
If the service is for a deceased person, Mail Forwarding for Moves must be purchased.

Customers who are returning to the old address, or who wish to forward mail for another reason, must buy the Mail Forwarding for Temporary Relocation (e.g.: Canadian residents wintering outside of the country and returning to maintain residency status, i.e., Snowbird service).

There are two Mail Forwarding service fee types:

Residential fee: applies to one or more individuals, such as, but not limited to a family, using an address as a place of residence only.

Business fee: applies to an enterprise of any sort, whether commercial, industrial, professional, social, artistic or altruistic, whether for profit or not, as distinguished from one or more individuals, such as but not limited to a family using an address as a place of residence only.


Pricing Information

When forwarding mail addressed to individuals, residential prices apply. Business prices apply when a business name is included. To obtain information on pricing, see Canada Post Prices.

Delivery Standards at a Glance

Delivery standards are estimates of how long it will take for the mail to be delivered. These delivery standards are not guaranteed.

The delivery standard for forwarded mail can be calculated by adding the delivery standard of the postal service initially used and the delivery standard from the old address to the new address, plus one day.

Service duration

The Mail Forwarding for Moves service is offered for periods of:

12 months (recommended): The 12-month service option offers greater value and ensures movers won't miss annual or infrequent mailings, such as tax documents, car license sticker renewals, financial statements and membership/club renewals.
4 months: The service period is an economical option that provides short-term protection against mail being delivered to the old address, which can be extended, if necessary.
Before the service expires, customers will have the option to extend for an additional four or 12 months.

The Mail Forwarding for Temporary Relocation / Other service is offered for any duration. While the minimum price for Mail Forwarding for temporary residential service is based on a three month period, the minimum price for temporary business service is based on a period of one month. Customers can extend the service before the expiry date for as long as needed. If the original service purchased was for less than three months and the customer subsequently wishes to renew the service for any period of time, the price of the extension will be calculated based on the period in excess of three months.

Mail recipients

All mail recipients must share the same original and forwarding addresses.

Residential

Purchased Online - can include up to eight individual names. The first four individual names are included in the base fee; and up to four additional names may be purchased, for a nominal fee.
Purchased at a Post Office - can include up to four individual names. Up to four additional names, beyond the initial four, may be added online, for a nominal fee.

Business

Purchased Online - can include a maximum of two business names and six individual names. The first two individual names are included in the base fee; and up to four additional names may be included, for a nominal fee.
Purchased at a Post Office - can include a maximum of two business names and two individual names. Up to four individual names, beyond the initial two, may be added online, for a nominal fee.

NOTE:
Higher fees will apply for businesses identified as receiving high volumes of mail (Large Volume Receivers). Contact Customer Service for more information at 1‑800‑267‑1177.
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Old 19-07-2020, 13:28   #28
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

The problem is living on a boat moving around the world means we will have no fixed address. Hence the term nomad in the title. For this reason, Canada Post is not an option.
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Old 19-07-2020, 13:56   #29
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

Quote:
Originally Posted by NaClyDog View Post
The problem is living on a boat moving around the world means we will have no fixed address. Hence the term nomad in the title. For this reason, Canada Post is not an option.
Okay, nomad it is, but it appears that you still need to have a primary residence in your province and keep your address records current with the agencies.

FYI:

If you have moved, you need to change the address on your health card, driver’s licence, and/or vehicle permit online. When you update a driver’s licence or vehicle permit, you must also update the address on your health card so the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care has your new address on file.

Deadline for updating your address
From the time your address changes you must, by law, update your:

driver’s licence and vehicle permit (the green ownership document) within 6 days;
health card within 30 days.

What you need to change your address
For all services you’ll need your complete new residential and/or mailing address, including your address (with your unit number, floor, number, etc.), postal code, city and province.

Driver’s licence, and vehicle permit
To change your driver’s licence or vehicle permit, you’ll need your:

driver’s licence number, or registrant identification number
issue date on your driver’s licence

Photo health card

If your health card has an address printed on it, you cannot update your address online. You must update it in person at a ServiceOntario centre.

To change the address on your photo health card online, you’ll need:

your health card number and version code
the postal code on your current driver’s licence
the 9 characters found on the back of your health card

Red and white health card
To change the address on your red and white health card, you’ll need:

your health card number and version code (if applicable)
the postal code on your current driver’s licence

Change of Address
If you are moving or have moved:

You are required by law to inform the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care if you change your address. It is important that you keep your address up-to-date in order to keep your OHIP coverage active. Keeping your address up-to-date will also ensure that you receive any communications from the ministry about your OHIP coverage.

There are four ways to update your address:

Use the ServiceOntario.ca/addresschange to update your change of address online.
Forms are available on Forms Online or from your local ServiceOntario centre.
Send a letter or visit your local ServiceOntario centre. You must include your name, health number, telephone number, current address, and new address including postal code. Go to ServiceOntario.ca/findservices to find the centre nearest you.
If you have a photo health card and update your residential address, you may receive a new health card. Your address will not be shown on the back of the card. If your photo health card has expired, you must visit a ServiceOntario centre in person.

If you have a red and white health card, or photo health card, that does not show your address on the back of the card, you can continue to use it and the ministry database will be updated with your change of address information.


To change your address on your passport:

cross out the old address on page 4
write the new address in the space above the old one
if there isn’t enough room on the page, write the new address on a separate piece of paper and insert it into your passport
don’t use correction fluid (whiteout)
A change of address doesn’t make a passport invalid.

Proof of residency, for example in Ontario

A second, different document needs to prove you live in Ontario for OHIP– choose one from this list which will provide your current physical address where you live:

valid Ontario driver’s licence
temporary driver’s licence
only if accompanied by photo licence card with the same address
valid Ontario Photo Card
original, mailed utility bill (e.g. cable TV, hydro, gas, water)
monthly mailed bank account statements for savings or chequing accounts
does not include receipts, bank books, letters or automated teller receipts
employer record (e.g. pay stub, letter from employer on company letterhead)
school, college or university report card or transcript
Child Tax Benefit statement
most recent income tax Notice of Assessment
insurance policy (e.g. home, tenant, auto or life)
mortgage, rental or lease agreement
Ontario motor vehicle permit (plate or vehicle portions)
property tax bill
statement of direct deposit for Ontario Works or for Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP)
statement of Employment Insurance Benefits Paid (T4E)
statement of Old Age Security (T4A) or statement of Canada Pension Plan Benefits (T4A) (P)
Any of the following statements from a bank, trust company or credit union:
Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP)
Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF)
Registered Home Ownership Savings Plan (RHOSP)
Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Statement of Benefits (T5007)
Canada Pension Plan Statement of Contributions
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Old 19-07-2020, 14:29   #30
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Re: Any liveaboard Canadian expat nomads here?

Oh, the joy of taxation. I had an employee, former resident of Canada send over guidance.

Determining your residency status

Under Canada's tax system, your income tax obligations to Canada are based on your residency status. You need to know your residency status before you can know what your tax responsibilities and filing requirements to Canada are.

An individual's residency status is determined on a case by case basis and the individual's whole situation and all the relevant facts must be considered.

The following steps can help you determine your residency status for income tax purposes and your tax obligations to Canada.

Step 1: Determine if you have residential ties with Canada

The most important thing to consider when determining your residency status in Canada for income tax purposes is whether or not you maintain, or you establish, residential ties with Canada.

Significant residential ties to Canada include:

a home in Canada
a spouse or common-law partner in Canada
dependants in Canada

Secondary residential ties that may be relevant include:

personal property in Canada, such as a car or furniture
social ties in Canada, such as memberships in Canadian recreational or religious organizations
economic ties in Canada, such as Canadian bank accounts or credit cards
a Canadian driver's licence
a Canadian passport
health insurance with a Canadian province or territory

To determine residence status, all of the relevant facts in each case must be considered, including residential ties with Canada and length of time, object, intent, and continuity while living inside and outside Canada.

The information above is general in nature. For more information on your residential ties, see Income Tax Folio S5-F1-C1, Determining an Individual's Residence Status.

Step 2: Determine your residency status and its tax implications

Your residency status if you left Canada

If you are working temporarily outside Canada, vacationing outside Canada, commuting (going back and forth daily or weekly) from Canada to your place of work in the United States, or attending school in another country, and you maintain residential ties with Canada, you may be considered a factual resident of Canada

If you left Canada and established a permanent home in another country and you severed your residential ties with Canada ceasing to be a resident of Canada in the tax year, you may be considered an emigrant

If you established ties in a country that Canada has a tax treaty with and you are considered a resident of that country, but you are otherwise a factual resident of Canada, meaning you maintain significant residential ties with Canada, you may be considered a deemed non-resident of Canada. The same rules apply to deemed non-residents as non-residents of Canada. So it can matter as to where you go to as to your deemed status.


Your residency status if you normally, customarily, or routinely live in another country

If you did not have significant residential ties [e.g., in Canada, maintain a home, spouse, dependents] with Canada and you lived outside Canada throughout the year (except if you were a deemed resident of Canada, see further below regarding deemed resident
), you may be considered a non-resident of Canada

If you did not have significant residential ties with Canada and you stayed in Canada for less than 183 days in the tax year, you may be considered a non-resident of Canada

If you want the Canada Revenue Agency's opinion on your residency status, complete either Form NR74, Determination of Residency Status (Entering Canada) or Form NR73, Determination of Residency Status (Leaving Canada), whichever applies, and send it to the address indicated on the form. To get the most accurate opinion, provide as many details as possible on your form.

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-age...orms/nr73.html



Income Tax Folio S5-F1-C1, Determining an Individual’s Residence Status
Series 5: International and Residency

Folio 1: Residency

Chapter 1: Determining an Individual’s Residence Status

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-age...ce-status.html

Under the Canadian income tax system, an individual's liability for income tax is based on his or her status as a resident or a non-resident of Canada.

An individual who is resident in Canada during a tax year is subject to Canadian income tax on his or her worldwide income from all sources. Generally, a non-resident individual is only subject to Canadian income tax on income from sources inside Canada.

An individual who is resident in Canada can be characterized as ordinarily resident or deemed resident. An individual who is ordinarily resident in Canada will be subject to Canadian tax on his or her worldwide income during the part of the year in which he or she is resident in Canada; during the other part of the year, the individual will be taxed as a non-resident.

An individual who is deemed resident in Canada in a particular year will be subject to Canadian income tax on his or her worldwide income throughout that year. In certain situations, an individual who would otherwise be ordinarily resident or deemed resident in Canada may be deemed not to be resident in Canada pursuant to subsection 250(5) and the tie-breaker rules of an income tax treaty.

The factors to be considered in the determination of an individual’s residence status are discussed throughout this Chapter.

Many of the comments in this Chapter apply to determinations of residence status for provincial, as well as federal, tax purposes.

Taxpayers seeking a less technical overview of these matters may prefer to first review Residency – Individuals on the CRA website.

Are you a deemed resident?

You are a deemed resident of Canada for tax purposes if you are in ONE of the following situations:

You lived outside Canada during the tax year, you are not considered to be a factual resident of Canada because you did not have significant residential ties, and you are a government employee, a member of the Canadian Forces including their overseas school staff, or working under a Global Affairs Canada assistance program. This could also apply to the family members of an individual who is in one of these situations. For more information, see Government employees outside Canada

You stayed in Canada for 183 days or more (the 183-day rule) in the tax year, do not have significant residential ties with Canada, and are not considered a resident of another country under the terms of a tax treaty between Canada and that country

Notes
If you are a deemed resident of Canada, and also establish residential ties in a country with which Canada has a tax treaty and you are considered to be a resident of that country for the purposes of that tax treaty, you may be considered a deemed non-resident of Canada for tax purposes.

You become a deemed non-resident of Canada when your ties with the other country become such that, under the tax treaty with which Canada has with the other country, you would be considered a resident of that other country and not Canada.

As a deemed non-resident of Canada, the same rules apply to you as a non-resident of Canada.

The 183-day rule

When you calculate the number of days you stayed in Canada during the tax year, include each day or part of a day that you stayed in Canada. These include:

the days you attended a Canadian university or college
the days you worked in Canada
the days you spent on vacation in Canada, including on weekend trips
If you lived in the United States and commuted to work in Canada, do not include commuting days in the calculation.

Your tax obligations

If you are a deemed resident of Canada for the tax year, you:

must report world income (income from all sources, both inside and outside Canada) for the entire tax year
can claim all deductions and non-refundable tax credits that apply to you
are subject to federal tax and instead of paying provincial or territorial tax, you'll pay a federal surtax
can claim all federal tax credits, but you cannot claim provincial or territorial tax credits
are eligible to apply for the goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) credit
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