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Old 20-11-2020, 14:11   #361
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Yep. Really easy for him to preach about money when he made boat loads of money.

He also received $10,000 as an advance on his movie. He went sailing on his ship, his "yacht" was 95 feet long, and he had a crew of six.

His ship cost him $20,000 in 1955 when the average wage was $3,400.

I "get" what he is saying, and he did things that deserve respect, but it is hard to swallow his "advice" about money when he had plenty.

We are spending quite a bit of money to go sailing. I don't want to add up what we have spent and we don't own a boat. But without money, we would not be sailing.

Later,
Dan
And if I remember correctly from reading his book..... he took off with his kids to avoid a custody battle and also to escape persecution from McCarthy inquests.

Best line in his book Wanderer was:

"I am.probably the only man in the world to have bought a 90 ft yacht and joined the Communist party all in the same day"
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Old 20-11-2020, 15:11   #362
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

Money?

Let's see...

I bought a Cal 25 at age 25 for $1500.
It had two sails, an outboard motor, one battery, and a handheld vhf (and radar reflector)
I sold the fridge for an old fashioned icebox that would drain into the bilge and $20.
I packed my clothes, tools, and camping gear aboard - including a Coleman stove, and moved aboard full time.

I sailed solo for three years - from Mexico to Santa Cruz, lived aboard, spent a year and a half on Catalina island (most of the time at anchor outside Avalon) as my base as a bar tender for that money we're talking about.

When I sold the boat for $1500, it had the same icebox, same sails, same vhf, same radar reflector, same outboard, a new battery with solar trickle charger, and a new handheld GPS (technically two since I immediately dropped the first one overboard and dutifully put into my notebook "Things that do not float".

Boating is so expensive! ;-)

Of course I was young, stupid, and immortal (I thought) and I wouldn't recommend what I did as a smart (or comfortable) option, but I will never forget three of the best years of my life. God I miss that boat sometimes.

So yeah - you do you and only you can decide what's "enough" and what's worth putting up with and what's not. This go round, we're spending around 75K to outfit our Tayana and sail around the world - I even have FOUR BATTERIES this time and some electronics that...gasp!!!...mount to the boat permanently!!!!!! In a boat I can stand up in! With a real Galley!

Big Daddy Warbucks in the house! lol
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Old 21-11-2020, 05:13   #363
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Has the thread drifted from early retirees going cruising to the anti-cruising or “that isn't cruising” from the non cruiser?
Don't they all?
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Old 21-11-2020, 10:17   #364
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

Not at retirement age yet, I spent half of spring and the whole summer cruising with my wife last year. Back to work this year. There is an itch to go cruising again in a few years, but for the moment, I am fine with being back to work. The experience still drives me, I am much more relaxed as all the stuff at work is far less critical than having to get things right during a landfall on a second reef night with the entry being a passage between rocks, some submerged. I have also gained a lot in terms of "can do" self consciousness which is still driving me forward.

So, that is an option as well: Having a cruising break and then starting over on shore.

Very generally: Who knows what the world will look at in 2 or 3 years? It does not make sense to plan ahead in detail to far as things are changing all the time. If you want to try the cruising life, do so. It does not have to be a decision for ever and ever.
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Old 21-11-2020, 10:58   #365
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Not at retirement age yet, I spent half of spring and the whole summer cruising with my wife last year. Back to work this year. There is an itch to go cruising again in a few years, but for the moment, I am fine with being back to work. The experience still drives me, I am much more relaxed as all the stuff at work is far less critical than having to get things right during a landfall on a second reef night with the entry being a passage between rocks, some submerged. I have also gained a lot in terms of "can do" self consciousness which is still driving me forward.

So, that is an option as well: Having a cruising break and then starting over on shore....
.
Exactly. Very similar to what we did, albeit we were out considerably longer ( 5 years). Certainly makes going back to life ashore much more interesting and a lot less stressful. One of the best options, IMHO.
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Old 21-11-2020, 11:38   #366
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Still the best quote ever on when to do it.

“To be truly challenging, a voyage, like a life, must rest on a firm foundation of financial unrest. Otherwise, you are doomed to a routine traverse, the kind known to yachtsmen who play with their boats at sea... "cruising" it is called. Voyaging belongs to seamen, and to the wanderers of the world who cannot, or will not, fit in. If you are contemplating a voyage and you have the means, abandon the venture until your fortunes change. Only then will you know what the sea is all about.

"I've always wanted to sail to the south seas, but I can't afford it." What these men can't afford is not to go. They are enmeshed in the cancerous discipline of "security." And in the worship of security we fling our lives beneath the wheels of routine - and before we know it our lives are gone.

What does a man need - really need? A few pounds of food each day, heat and shelter, six feet to lie down in - and some form of working activity that will yield a sense of accomplishment. That's all - in the material sense, and we know it. But we are brainwashed by our economic system until we end up in a tomb beneath a pyramid of time payments, mortgages, preposterous gadgetry, playthings that divert our attention for the sheer idiocy of the charade.

The years thunder by, The dreams of youth grow dim where they lie caked in dust on the shelves of patience. Before we know it, the tomb is sealed.

Where, then, lies the answer? In choice. Which shall it be: bankruptcy of purse or bankruptcy of life? ”

Stirling Hayden, Wanderer.

It either makes sense to you, or it doesn't.
Thanks for posting that. It's been quite some years since I read Wonderer and it brought back memories of how much I enjoyed that book.

Hayden, for those of you unfamiliar with his bio.... started out as the youngest schooner skipper on the east coast (still in his teens I think), racing against the formidable Bluenose, if I remember correctly. It was that press exposure that vaulted him into an acting career. He hated Hollywood and acting and was pretty lousy at it. He worked only when he needed money, and with the studio system at that time, and the salaryman type wages, acting was not the lucrative profession it is today.

Still, for a man who came from nowhere and with probably very little education, Hayden shows incredible insight and eloquence in that short passage you quoted.
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Old 21-11-2020, 13:03   #367
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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In the 1960's when you ventured off shore ...YOU VENTURED OFFSHORE
Ah , yes the 60s when a handful of people had yachts and even fewer went anywhere and a mere handful “ventured offshore “ , today 100,000 are in big yachts and loads have gone out of sight of land.
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Old 21-11-2020, 22:20   #368
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

This thread started some time ago and I find it quite interested. We fit in the description and though we have not walked away to be on the boat full time yet, we hope to do so very soon. I’ve always sailed other peoples boats, done fractional ownership or something to that effect. We get our first boat in just a few weeks now and with our youngest graduating from high school very soon, we are eager to make the leap.

My family put up with me in the military for 23 years, and then in executive level positions for 10 years since I retired from the military. I’m looking forward to giving time back to my wife, and returning to the sea (I’m a retired Marine), it’s beauty and sharing that with her. I’m highly compensated, and could make a lot more, but at 49 now I have no intentions to really max out what I could earn. I’d prefer to share the beauty and experience of the world with my wife, and have the ability to offer experiences to my kids, and eventually grandkids, that they are not likely to find anywhere else and that more money in the bank will not provide.

What we’ve been advised is “make sure you have a home port” because 100% on the boat (Saona 47 in our case) can be tougher than most think, so have a place to go to so you can get away. Hence, our plan is 6 moths on La Belle Vie, and 6 months in Ireland, where my wife is from. We do plan a circumnavigation, but other than that 3 year period, the plan is 6 on, 6 off.
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Old 22-11-2020, 04:40   #369
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Thanks for posting that. It's been quite some years since I read Wonderer and it brought back memories of how much I enjoyed that book.

Hayden, for those of you unfamiliar with his bio.... started out as the youngest schooner skipper on the east coast (still in his teens I think), racing against the formidable Bluenose, if I remember correctly. It was that press exposure that vaulted him into an acting career. He hated Hollywood and acting and was pretty lousy at it. He worked only when he needed money, and with the studio system at that time, and the salaryman type wages, acting was not the lucrative profession it is today.

Still, for a man who came from nowhere and with probably very little education, Hayden shows incredible insight and eloquence in that short passage you quoted.
I also read the book a long time ago.
If I remember correctly, Hayden crewed as Mate on the clipper ship Yankee which is where via National Geographic, he got his film exposure and shot at acting
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Old 22-11-2020, 04:47   #370
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Ah , yes the 60s when a handful of people had yachts and even fewer went anywhere and a mere handful “ventured offshore “ , today 100,000 are in big yachts and loads have gone out of sight of land.
Right but the point was when you did it in the 1960' s you needed to know how to sail and how to navigate via the stars, planets, and compass.

There were no EPIRBS, no GPS, No SAT Phones, No InReach, etc

You needed some idea of what you were doing.

There was none of the "just go" nonsense where you get a newer boat, load in with every electronic instrument known to man and motor out.

For example, when Robin Lee Graham sailed off toward Hawaii in 1965, he had a home made wind vane autopilot, his sextant/compass/charts, and maybe a VHF on his 24' sailboat. (Dove)

Plus an outboard for motoring in and out of harbors/marinas.

Then after 5 years of circumnavigating, he (and Patti) sold the boat and moved to the mountains.

https://flatheadliving.com/2019/07/06/sailor-home/
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Old 22-11-2020, 05:15   #371
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Right but the point was when you did it in the 1960' s you needed to know how to sail and how to navigate via the stars, planets, and compass.

There were no EPIRBS, no GPS, No SAT Phones, No InReach, etc

You needed some idea of what you were doing.

There was none of the "just go" nonsense where you get a newer boat, load in with every electronic instrument known to man and motor out.

For example, when Robin Lee Graham sailed off toward Hawaii in 1965, he had a home made wind vane autopilot, his sextant/compass/charts, and maybe a VHF on his 24' sailboat. (Dove)

Plus an outboard for motoring in and out of harbors/marinas.
I get that modern technology has really put a kink in your idea of cruising... but the rest of us are happy to have it to ensure the safety of our family and friends out here while making crossings!

Seems pretty easy to sit at home with shore always in sight and talk about how all those safety devices aren't needed or have "ruined sailing"... but until you've spent considerable time offshore, tracking weather and trying to make decisions about when to pick up anchor and leave the sight of shore for multiday crossings safely with both your home and family in tow... I'm not really sure you understand.

We all get to make our choices.
To take a leap with the "just go" nonsense, to sit and home and talk about how it's not like it used to be "back in the gold ole days" back when we used to cruise, or to never leave shore at all but talk a lot about how its ruined anyway.

But... that's also the beauty isn't it?

IF you do ever decide to leave the sight of shore you'll also get to make the decision at that point whether to outfit your boat with all the tools and technology available, or to leave all those things back home and do it however you choose!
Regardless of these decisions, you'll still have to take that critical first step and "just go".
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Old 22-11-2020, 05:29   #372
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Has the thread drifted from early retirees going cruising to the anti-cruising or “that isn't cruising” from the non cruiser?
Yes, why yes it has.

And on that note, people out cruising don't really care if some non cruiser thinks they do it wrong.

If you want leave your couch and be a “real cruiser” just go it. Oh wait that would mean ........
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Old 22-11-2020, 06:22   #373
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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I get that modern technology has really put a kink in your idea of cruising...
I think you missed the point.

I was comparing 60's cruising to todays version of it.

As far as modern technology putting a kink in my idea of cruising, that's quite funny.

I'm the manager of electronic, computer, and cyber technicians. So modern technology is sort of hard for me to escape from. The new company even required us all managers and tech's to have either a Comptia Computer Tech, Network Tech, or Cyber Security Tech Cert just to keep our job. The tech book was 900 pages and we were given 90 days to get the Cert and pass the two exams.

I knew some of it having been a tech since the 70's back when you didn't have the GUI displays of today and everything was done from the command prompt.

Until this past year though, I did sail with just charts and GPS then last Spring I built myself a Chart Plotter which also displayed AIS.

I used a Raspberry Pi 4 which has a Linux OS and the display is on a 19" HDTV. I downloaded OpenCPN to the RPi and have AIS NMEA data coming in from my VHF. GPS is from the VHF also plus a GPS USB hockey Puck as backup.

I like the AIS because I have two busy shipping channels to cross on my normal 20 mile run across the bay to the north.
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Old 22-11-2020, 06:22   #374
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Yes, why yes it has.

And on that note, people out cruising don't really care if some non cruiser thinks they do it wrong.

If you want leave your couch and be a “real cruiser” just go it. Oh wait that would mean ........
I thought you were actually a fat man living on the couch in your parents basement???
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Old 22-11-2020, 06:26   #375
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Re: Any early retirees turned cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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I thought you were actually a fat man living on the couch in your parents basement???
I have a floating Duckie for my bathtub now. Based on various threads I feel that counts.

Btw- the Duckie retired very early.
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