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Old 21-12-2019, 07:12   #166
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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We are herd like creatures, I think many dont take the "risk " that you have because the comfort of the herd is is to strong, comfort dosen't necessarily mean one is happy. Personally I saw more risk in doing what the herd does , the same old same old ,day in day out, accumulating more and more etc, I call it "the creeping death of sameness ".

I've been doing this so long that I now wonder if I'm just part of another herd, to comfortable...lol.
Please.

It simply doesn't work like that. Just because you don't quit your job and go cruising doesn't mean you are a member of a herd and afraid to take the risk of going cruising.

The only thing I see at risk is variety because once you are stuck on a boat things really slow down. Speaking of same old same old.

On the other hand, maybe it's that those that do quit and go cruising couldn't keep up with the herd when it was moving fast and had to drop out.

I knew a guy that hiked the entire 330 mile Allegheny Trail alone then decided to get a boat become a liveaboard, and cruise.

He was bored to death in a few months and sold the boat.

Many of the cruisers I have observed live a sort of slow down lifestyle which is great when you are old enough to slow down.

A few days ago I did off road cycling for a couple hours on the woods trail. Afterward energy drink then back to work. Later to the library then a stop at the boat

Today it's running 2.5 miles and weights then later to the boat to check the solar

Next week a short trip to the country, do the holiday thing, burn excess from yard work and wood from an old shed that my son took down. Then maybe a trip to the seaside near the barrier islands to see and hear the geese.

Yesterday I took a noon sun sight with my beginner sextant from a busy but large strip mall parking lot then got lunch from the salad/meat bar then read for a while then back to work

Later a stop at the boat to remove the jib and dodger for Winter.

I'm thinking a split between cruising, working, and living ashore until maybe age 70 when you start to slow down is best for some whether you are part of a herd or not.

Others though may try to rejoin the herd but once you drop out it's very hard to catch back up.

It's like what happens when you drop out of the peloton when on a long distance fast cycling trip. it's very hard if not almost impossible to rejoin
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Old 21-12-2019, 07:24   #167
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Please.

It simply doesn't work like that. Just because you don't quit your job and go cruising doesn't mean you are a member of a herd and afraid to take the risk of going cruising.

The only thing I see at risk is variety because once you are stuck on a boat things really slow down. Speaking of same old same old.

On the other hand, maybe it's that those that do quit and go cruising couldn't keep up with the herd when it was moving fast and had to drop out.

I knew a guy that hiked the entire 330 mile Allegheny Trail alone then decided to get a boat become a liveaboard, and cruise.

He was bored to death in a few months and sold the boat.

Many of the cruisers I have observed live a sort a slow down lifestyle which is great when you are old enough to slow down.

A few days ago I did off road cycling for a couple hours on the woods trail. Afterward energy drink then back to work. Later to the library then a stop at the boat

Today it's running 2.5 miles and weights then later to the boat to check the solar

Next week a short trip to the country, do the holiday thing, burn excess from yard work and wood from an old shed that my son took down

Yesterday I took a noon sun sight with my beginner sextant from a bust but large strip mall parking lot then got lunch from the salad/meat bar then read for a while then back to work

Later a stop at the boat to remove the jib and dodger for Winter.

I'm thinking a split between cruising, working, and living ashore until maybe age 70 when you start to slow down
Yes, the western disease, collecting more stuff and the need to be constantly busy.

I'm not suggesting your doing it wrong Thom but I can assure you alot of my friends back home wake up wanting my crusing life more often than I wake up wanting their normal life. Many, not all want something more than "busyiness" but dont have the courage to make a move away from it.

You've never really cruised so you really dont understand the cruising life, I have lived the normal "busyness" western life, thus I do understand it. I was one that needed to always feel productive, I've worked hard at losing that mentality.

In no way do I suggest your not happy doing your life, you defend your choice regularly this I can only assume suggests your very happy filling your days with much activity.

Regarding us being herd creatures, I think that's a given.
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Old 21-12-2019, 07:30   #168
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

It is interesting to hear all the different approaches to cruising. So far, we have gone the sabbatical route returning to work each time. Our first trip was through the Eastern Caribbean for 6 months. The second trip was through the Western Caribbean for a year. Both of those trips were in a monohull with our kids onboard. More recently, we spent 2 years on our catamaran sailing around the world. We enjoy moving and visiting new places and a sailboat provides an opportunity to see places a bit off the beaten path. I think everyone has to figure out the approach that works for them, and as mentioned, that approach will probably change over time.
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Old 21-12-2019, 07:39   #169
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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It is interesting to hear all the different approaches to cruising. So far, we have gone the sabbatical route returning to work each time. Our first trip was through the Eastern Caribbean for 6 months. The second trip was through the Western Caribbean for a year. Both of those trips were in a monohull with our kids onboard. More recently, we spent 2 years on our catamaran sailing around the world. We enjoy moving and visiting new places and a sailboat provides an opportunity to see places a bit off the beaten path. I think everyone has to figure out the approach that works for them, and as mentioned, that approach will probably change over time.
We're home between cruises now. We have always gone for year long cruises before, but , we have decided that a shorter cruising schedule (6 months on/6 months off) is going to be what works best for us for the near future as well.

After that, who knows?
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Old 21-12-2019, 08:13   #170
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Yes, the western disease, collecting more stuff and the need to be constantly busy.

I'm not suggesting your doing it wrong Thom but I can assure you alot of my friends back home wake up wanting my crusing life more often than I wake up wanting their normal life. Many, not all want something more than "busyiness" but dont have the courage to make a move away from it.

You've never really cruised so you really dont understand the cruising life, I have lived the normal "busyness" western life, thus I do understand it. I was one that needed to always feel productive, I've worked hard at losing that mentality.

In no way do I suggest your not happy doing your life, you defend your choice regularly this I can only assume suggests your very happy filling your days with much activity.

Regarding us being herd creatures, I think that's a given.
Many of us are not into collecting more stuff, we just are not yet ready for a slow down lifestyle

I believe I have cruised locally enough to get a good sense of what it will be like when cruising full time which for me will probably be 6-7 months out of the year.

I was lucky in that I got to live, work, sail and race along the Gulf Coast for many years and while there also was able to observe many cruisers. Also spent a few years along the North Carolina Coast and Mississippi River

There's no one size fits all here. Everyone is different.

There was a show last night on Bill Belichick (age 67) and Nick Saban (age 68). They are both successful football coaches and could easily retire but do not. Both have large boats also and enjoy the water

I don't always enjoy working but am definitely not ready for a singular type life since I'm only in my mid 60's.

On the other hand, I first drove a boat maybe 10 miles as a 6-7 year old so it's not totally new to me and possibly some of the fun of just steering and being on a boat has decreased some

It's a tough call for many

We had a guy, one of my guys, just this week pass away totally unexpected. Age 59.

Another age 80, will be retiring in February 2020. He loves to cruise the halls when not busy and visit with everyone. He maintains the software on one of the few mainframe systems we have left and it's about ready to go offline for good.
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Old 21-12-2019, 08:27   #171
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Please.

It simply doesn't work like that. Just because you don't quit your job and go cruising doesn't mean you are a member of a herd and afraid to take the risk of going cruising.

The only thing I see at risk is variety because once you are stuck on a boat things really slow down. Speaking of same old same old.

On the other hand, maybe it's that those that do quit and go cruising couldn't keep up with the herd when it was moving fast and had to drop out.

I knew a guy that hiked the entire 330 mile Allegheny Trail alone then decided to get a boat become a liveaboard, and cruise.

He was bored to death in a few months and sold the boat.

Many of the cruisers I have observed live a sort of slow down lifestyle which is great when you are old enough to slow down.
I guess Iím gonna need some more first hand experience from you and your ďguyĒ and where you spend/spent your time on boats... in a little over a year (since we moved onto the boat and pointed south) just about the only thing we havenít felt yet was ďboredĒ.

I guess if you sat on a dock for those months aboard, or made it as far as Georgetown and sat there with the other boats that have turned that harbor into a bit of a floating trailer park than maybe youíd get bored... but isnít that the beauty of living in a boat?
To have the choice to do either. To sit in a safe or protected harbor, or NOT and point that boat out and explore new islands and countries and cultures!?


But more to your point of the herd...
I donít think anyone was calling you out specifically. If you love your life of rhythm and work thatís great for you!
Just be aware that puts you in a small minority of people, while the vast majority actually want desperately something different (not necessarily related to boats at all) but feel very much trapped and afraid because everyone and everything around them tells them they cannot go.
I know... I was one of them for all too long.

Thatís stifling voice is the herd. and itís not one I care to ďcatch up withĒ at all. Iím happy to watch the crowded peloton and itís chase vehicles and sponsors/marketing and crowds all continue onward in mass towards some made up finish line... donít mind me while I turn off on the nearest unmarked trail instead.
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Old 21-12-2019, 08:33   #172
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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I guess Iím gonna need some more first hand experience from you and your ďguyĒ and where you spend/spent your time on boats... in a little over a year (since we moved onto the boat and pointed south) just about the only thing we havenít felt yet was ďboredĒ.

I guess if you sat on a dock for those months aboard, or made it as far as Georgetown and sat there with the other boats that have turned that harbor into a bit of a floating trailer park than maybe youíd get bored... but isnít that the beauty of living in a boat?
To have the choice to do either. To sit in a safe or protected harbor, or NOT and point that boat out and explore new islands and countries and cultures!?


But more to your point of the herd...
I donít think anyone was calling you out specifically. If you love your life of rhythm and work thatís great for you!
Just be aware that puts you in a small minority of people, while the vast majority actually want desperately something different (not necessarily related to boats at all) but feel very much trapped and afraid because everyone and everything around them tells them they cannot go.
I know... I was one of them for all too long.

Thatís stifling voice is the herd. and itís not one I care to ďcatch up withĒ at all. Iím happy to watch the crowded peloton and itís chase vehicles and sponsors/marketing and crowds all continue onward in mass towards some made up finish line... donít mind me while I turn off on the nearest unmarked trail instead.
See you on the trail
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Old 21-12-2019, 08:42   #173
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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See you on the trail
Sundowners on us whenever the wakes finally cross!
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Old 21-12-2019, 08:58   #174
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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I guess I’m gonna need some more first hand experience from you and your “guy” and where you spend/spent your time on boats... in a little over a year (since we moved onto the boat and pointed south) just about the only thing we haven’t felt yet was “bored”.

I guess if you sat on a dock for those months aboard, or made it as far as Georgetown and sat there with the other boats that have turned that harbor into a bit of a floating trailer park than maybe you’d get bored... but isn’t that the beauty of living in a boat?
To have the choice to do either. To sit in a safe or protected harbor, or NOT and point that boat out and explore new islands and countries and cultures!?


But more to your point of the herd...
I don’t think anyone was calling you out specifically. If you love your life of rhythm and work that’s great for you!
Just be aware that puts you in a small minority of people, while the vast majority actually want desperately something different (not necessarily related to boats at all) but feel very much trapped and afraid because everyone and everything around them tells them they cannot go.
I know... I was one of them for all too long.

That’s stifling voice is the herd. and it’s not one I care to “catch up with” at all. I’m happy to watch the crowded peloton and it’s chase vehicles and sponsors/marketing and crowds all continue onward in mass towards some made up finish line... don’t mind me while I turn off on the nearest unmarked trail instead.
My "guy" was a beginner. Recently out of the military convinced of the 'just do it" idea.

I on the other hand bought my first boat for fishing and skiing in 1971 when I was 17 then 5-6 more in the next 9 years even though a couple of those were spent in the desert near Yuma, AZ. (before owning my own I went with friends or neighbors on their boats from about 6 years old until I could buy)

First sailboat was 1983 with 5 more by 2011. Four being beach cats for racing.

The only time I'm at a dock is when at my home marina.

The time on boats was both bayside and seaside Eastern Shore Peninsula, North Carolina from Cape Lookout to Swansboro outside and inside. Mississippi River near Memphis Tennessee, Tennessee River/Pickwick Lake crewing on Pearson 30 and Beneteau 35.5, Racing Beach Cats 16'-20' with and without spinnakers single handed and two up on TVA Lakes in Mississippi and along the Gulf Coast from Panama City, FL to Biloxi Mississippi and out to Ship and Horn Islands

When coming back from the ocean through the inlets on the seaside Eastern Shore the inlets were so shallow we had to pick a wave and ride in on the back of it while hoping the engine didn't quit which was quite fun at 15-20 years of age

Since 2011, I've been playing around with this old Bristol 27 cruising boat from here, the Hampton Roads Area, up and down the bay from a bit north of Tangier (where I used to fish on my 14' aluminum boat as a teenager) and exploring both the western and eastern sides and way up the creeks past where the channel markers stop

Also the pelotons I was speaking of are like the local triathletes and bike racers on a 60-70 mile weekend ride which I used to do in and around mobile and Pensacola and up here for a few years. There are no chase vehicles. You drop out and it's very hard to rejoin sort of like the working life or the life of a sled dog that is too old (see Jack London Call Of the Wild)

Once you drop out all you can do is sort of trail along behind hoping they stop or slow down for some reason or other
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Old 21-12-2019, 09:02   #175
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

OP, your question is a great one. So great that no one can truly answer it, but you. Sorry, but no one knows what tomorrow brings.

The risk is, wait too long and possibly die or lose your health working. Or, stop working too soon, and have financial woes in old age. Either way not a good ending!

Similar to Clint’s question below, how many healthy years do you think you have left?

Uh uh. I know what you're thinking. "Did he fire six shots or only five?" Well to tell you the truth in all this excitement I kinda lost track myself. But being this is a .44 Magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world and would blow your head clean off, you've gotta ask yourself one question: "Do I feel lucky?" Well, do ya, punk/OP?
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Old 21-12-2019, 09:20   #176
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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My "guy" was a beginner. Recently out of the military convinced of the 'just do it" idea.

I on the other hand bought my first boat for fishing and skiing in 1971 when I was 17 then 5-6 more in the next 9 years even though a couple of those were spent in the desert near Yuma, AZ. (before owning my own I went with friends or neighbors on their boats from about 6 years old until I could buy)

First sailboat was 1983 with 5 more by 2011. Four being beach cats for racing.

The only time I'm at a dock is when at my home marina.

The time on boats was both bayside and seaside Eastern Shore Peninsula, North Carolina from Cape Lookout to Swansboro outside and inside. Mississippi River near Memphis Tennessee, Tennessee River/Pickwick Lake crewing on Pearson 30 and Beneteau 35.5, Racing Beach Cats 16'-20' with and without spinnakers single handed and two up on TVA Lakes in Mississippi and along the Gulf Coast from Panama City, FL to Biloxi Mississippi and out to Ship and Horn Islands

When coming back from the ocean through the inlets on the seaside Eastern Shore the inlets were so shallow we had to pick a wave and ride in on the back of it while hoping the engine didn't quit which was quite fun at 15-20 years of age

Since 2011, I've been playing around with this old Bristol 27 cruising boat from here, the Hampton Roads Area, up and down the bay from a bit north of Tangier (where I used to fish on my 14' aluminum boat as a teenager) and exploring both the western and eastern sides and way up the creeks past where the channel markers stop

Also the pelotons I was speaking of are like the local triathletes and bike racers on a 60-70 mile weekend ride which I used to do in and around mobile and Pensacola and up here for a few years. There are no chase vehicles. You drop out and it's very hard to rejoin sort of like the working life or the life of a sled dog that is too old (see Jack London Call Of the Wild)

Once you drop out all you can do is sort of trail along behind hoping they stop or slow down for some reason or other
Still not much info on the “guy” but if he was new to sailing it’s even harder for me to believe he got “bored” unless he never left shore at all... as two newbies trying to learn to sail, read weather and tides, and somehow still find the time to explore new ports and islands it sounds damn near impossible le

For you... again, if you’re happy keep at it!! And if you’re not... maybe looking into a retirement or lifestyle that’s not related to boats is more exciting to you now (or head offshore to see if exploring some place new sparks something for you), sounds like maybe life aboard has lost its luster. No harm there... plenty to explore on land both home and abroad.

And I fully “got” your peloton reference/analogy... just raised the bar slightly to refer to the best in the sport.
Either way... no desire to catchup, and your sled dog reference couldn’t be more spot on to my point. That’s exactly why we’re out here exploring the tundra while still young enough to fully enjoy it!!
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Old 21-12-2019, 10:40   #177
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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Still not much info on the “guy” but if he was new to sailing it’s even harder for me to believe he got “bored” unless he never left shore at all... as two newbies trying to learn to sail, read weather and tides, and somehow still find the time to explore new ports and islands it sounds damn near impossible le

For you... again, if you’re happy keep at it!! And if you’re not... maybe looking into a retirement or lifestyle that’s not related to boats is more exciting to you now (or head offshore to see if exploring some place new sparks something for you), sounds like maybe life aboard has lost its luster. No harm there... plenty to explore on land both home and abroad.

And I fully “got” your peloton reference/analogy... just raised the bar slightly to refer to the best in the sport.
Either way... no desire to catchup, and your sled dog reference couldn’t be more spot on to my point. That’s exactly why we’re out here exploring the tundra while still young enough to fully enjoy it!!
I've been without a boat for a while here and there but never again.

It appears you are a beginner. I wonder how long you will last at it.

I've been in and around boats for over 57 years. I think my first interest in sailboats was from a book I read? (looked at) as a child. See below. looking at it now though I think that boom is too long and will probably cause substantial weather helm

I grew up around the water and around boats. (and tractors) Almost half the kids in my high school on Onancock Creek worked on their dad's boats in summer and during school sometimes. I was swimming in the ocean and getting slammed by big waves at 8-10 years old. Great fun up to a point. Also coming across wild Shetland ponies on the trails at Assateague was great as a kid

When on my boat, I like it when the wind is up and I have to work a bit. Since it's a small boat 20-25 knots of wind and up can be a real hoot.

Looks like you have made a home on the water with a large cat. I could never do that but it's good that it works for you

As we are starting to see and probably already knew, everyone is different and what works for one may not work for another.

The Guy and his buddy a Navy Seal went in on a boat together. The Seal was still active duty. He, the Seal, ended up buying a second boat which was a C&C 32.

The guy then moved aboard the other boat which was maybe a 34' Hunter.

Seal Guy then moved above the restaurant at the marina and soon was deployed to some god forsaken mountainous Middle Eastern country. The guy came and went for a while and eventually sold the boat

He is just an example of many I have seen do this since 1996.

I almost bought the C&C 32 but he gave it away to a lady he knew with cancer. She is 70 years old and I see her and her husband at the boat from time to time. She was military I think and worked closely with "the teams." She is in excellent shape and walks very erect like the leader of a military marching band. She's quite a character herself.

The good thing about my boat is that it is old and I have been painting and upgrading it while sailing it for the past 8 years

It's been quite interesting the transition from high tech racing beach cats to an old cruising boat involving risky anchoring just off a lee shore, caught out in the weather and not being able to run from it, and of course learning to liveaboard on those long days when weather doesn't allow your to leave you anchorage and you are stuck.
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Old 21-12-2019, 11:52   #178
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

My first suggestion is to see if you two can tolerate being together in a small space floating on the water.
1. Charter a boat with a captain for two weeks.
2. Purchase a moderate-sized boat and spend all your vacations on it - Anchor
out all the time.
3. If the above still is a happy experience purchase a USED high quality
Bluewater boat. My own choice is 40 - 53' Many people have world-wide experience in much smaller boats.
4. Take it easy. Cruise the US coastal areas for a year. Anchor out when you stop.
5. Take US Power Squadron or go to Maritime School and learn Coastal
Navigation, Piloting, and Celestial (yes old fashion but works when everything else is out) You can start this as soon as possible.
6. First bluewater - the Bahamas for a few months. Be careful - there are hundreds of would-be Cruisers waiting for a weather window for 5 or 6 years.
Most will NEVER go.

There are MANY locations that have NO marinas. Anchor every possible stop to become skilled at this misterous skill.

Enjoy.
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Old 21-12-2019, 13:00   #179
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

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I've been without a boat for a while here and there but never again.

It appears you are a beginner. I wonder how long you will last at it.

I've been in and around boats for over 57 years. I think my first interest in sailboats was from a book I read? (looked at) as a child. See below.
Well if reading that donald duck book counts as experience i've been a sailor my whole life!!
Kidding... Yes, we are beginners.
We had barely ever stepped aboard a boat much less sailed one before leaving FL last year.

But rather than spend our whole life living on land and sailing from the beach when it suits us, we chose to jump in with both feet and live it full time. We are also thrilled with that decision, even if we dont yet know how long it will last, whether we'll venture into the south pacific next year, circumnavigate after that, or if next year we decide we rather be back home with friends and family and exploring by road again... it doesn't matter to us as that was never the goal.
Our only goal (both before and after sailing) was/remains to live our best and happiest life, with no regrets and to not let fear, and or the accepted norm stop us from living whatever life we felt drawn to living.



To be honest... Im not sure what your stories about "this guy" and "that guy" are meant to show or prove - any more than what your intent by wondering/questioning how long we "will last at it" on our journey (much less our choice of boat) is intended to do...

If your point is that some people go and realize its not right for them, i totally agree... I said the same in an earlier post.
In our year out we've met far too many who turned back in the first weeks/months out and sold the boat as they realized it just wasn't the best lifestyle for them.

That doesn't change the fact that the OP came here asking for some advice on what he and his partner should do as it seems they want to go out and explore the world while doing a bit by cruising. We and others happen to believe they should... and even if they decide later to no longer do it- so what?
Good for them!!

They might just learn more from a few months or years cruising offshore and seeing new people/places/things than an entire life spent sailing and owning/working on boats along the gulf and eastern seaboard could ever hope to.



Maybe they move onto a boat and within the first year they visit 90 different islands and 17 different countries, learn more about sailing (and themselves) than they could have ever imagined, find themselves living their absolute best life and eager for more (as we have this past year)...
or
maybe they do all that and still find themselves "bored to death" like your "guy"??

The beauty is in that case...they went after it!
They can always go back to the lifestyle they knew before but will be better people for having experienced it, for having chased down a dream and lived it, and for having ignored the negative masses that make up the "herd" and paved their own way.



Happiness doesn't look the same for everyone... but until you've left the shore it's hard to know exactly what it is for you (and impossible to know what it is for someone else).

You seem to enjoy your job and life onshore and tinkering with boats on the evenings/weekend. Good for you, that's awesome!!
I wouldn't personally call it cruising, and as you admit earlier in the thread, you don't really hang out with cruisers, but seem to meet a lot of people that buy a boat in a marina and never use it...

That experience has little to nothing to do with the many, many people out there actually cruising full time who live on their boat, love it and cant possibly imagine being bored while living the life of their dreams... so no need to be so intent on creating a negative case against someone else going.
But... it IS exactly what "the herd" would want you to say.
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Old 21-12-2019, 13:26   #180
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Re: Any early retirees turnerd cruisers with big careers have regrets?

Enjoyed the industry I was working in. Decided life does not have to revolve around work. Retired at 55 and soon found out. Work was more than making money. A fulfilling job can be life and when you do not have that, a giant hole is born. I wound up bored after my bucket list was done. I live my boating life now which couldn't be better, but have now discovered a new product that lets me meet new people, helps them with a better life health wise, and donate money to many that are in need. If interested let me know and I will share.
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