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Old 09-03-2020, 20:53   #1
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Transferring engine from hoist to stand

This may be a bit of a strange post, but I wanted to document my solution to a problem in the hope of helping someone in the future.

I pulled my Yanmar 4JH2-TE from my boat and brought it home for a rebuild. I bought an engine hoist to lift the engine from my pickup and transfer it to an engine stand. I bought the stand and hoist from Harbor Freight (see photos). The problem here is that the hoist has a V-shaped leg arrangement that can neither straddle nor fit between the base of the stand. The casters on the stand and the hoist are about the same size, so I can't slide one under the other.

After some scary manhandling, I managed to get the engine on the stand and get it to the floor. I then contemplated how I would ever be able to reverse the process. Worse, I need to remove the flywheel (to change the rear seal), and I can't do that with the engine on the stand. So I'll have to lift it up on the hoist, remove the flywheel, then put it back on the stand. So how to do all this safely -- or at all?

The photos show how I solved this. I bolted some 2 x 12 planks onto the base of the stand, sized and placed so that the legs of the hoist can slide down the planks far enough to center the hoist chain over the center of the engine. I bolted some angle iron to the outside edges of the planks to prevent the casters of the hoist legs from slipping off the edge of the planks. Finally, I built a lever-board to lift/lower the hoist legs as they transition from floor to the planks or vice-versa. The photos show how all this works.

In the photos, the engine is already on the stand. The lifting board isn't really necessary, because you can just lift the hoist legs up onto the planks. But when I attach the engine to the hoist unbolt the stand, and move the hoist back, I don't want a 6-inch clunk to the floor. The lifting board transfers the weight from the planks down to the floor. It's made of 2 x 12, with a solid 2x2 maple handle bolted to it. Obviously, when I want to put the engine back on the stand, I'll follow the sequence shown in the photos. The lifting board will then really do its work, letting me lift up the hoist legs (now burdened with the engine) onto the planks.
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Old 09-03-2020, 20:58   #2
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

I'm a rough SOB. I would've shortened the front legs to slide in between the hoist.


I'm responding because I'm about to do the same thing with a hoist and stand and this might come in handy!
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Old 09-03-2020, 21:03   #3
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

I thought of that, but when you rotate the engine on the stand, it is surprisingly tippy - probably because of the torque you need to apply to the stand's rotation bar (the engine is really top-heavy relative to the center of the crankshaft and therefore the center of rotation of the stand). With the front of the stand base shortened, it would be almost like a three-point base, and you could easily tip the whole thing over on what remains of your foot.
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Old 09-03-2020, 21:09   #4
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

Yeah my engine's a bit lighter so might be able to get away with it.


It does make you wonder, though, how two items commonly sold side by side and purchased / used together could be so mismatched when purchased from a single supplier. I'm guessing the retailer's purchasing spec for that gear is something like "We don't care what it costs, as long as it's cheapest"?
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Old 09-03-2020, 22:30   #5
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

I have the exact lift and stand as you and am rebuilding my perkins m50. I just took the end of the engine stand off, bolted it to the engine and lifted it up high enough to slide the stand back on. Then lowered it and it slid off of the legs without much fuss.
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Old 10-03-2020, 05:31   #6
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

That's exactly what I did to get the engine on the stand. It wasn't too bad, but reversing the process would, I think, be a lot harder. The casters on the ends of the hoist legs would be hanging over the stand base. I would have to lift those legs up in order to unhook the legs from the stand base, with the weight of the engine enjoying a substantial gravitational advantage. Let me know how it works out for you - I may just be a bit of a chicken. :-)
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Old 10-03-2020, 11:50   #7
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

I would replace the wheels on either one or the other. Given that the cherry picker usually has to be moved much further than the stand, I'd mount the bigger wheels on it.
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Old 10-03-2020, 12:40   #8
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

They would have to be monster casters to raise the hoist's legs high enough to clear the stand base. An alternative would be to weld vertical extension posts to the hoist legs where the casters are fitted, then fit the casters at the bottom of the extension posts, thereby raising the whole thing enough to clear the stand base. If you're a welder, this would be a great solution. Unfortunately, I'm not a welder. :-)
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Old 10-03-2020, 12:53   #9
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

If you have a welder or a friend with one, why not cut off the engine hoist legs in front of those wheels on the cross brace, add another wider piece of cross-tubing to the base and just weld it all together with the hoist legs parallel and wide enough to straddle the engine stand?

There is no mechanical advantage to having the engine hoist legs in a splayed "A" configuration. 2" square tubing is readily available and cheap. I'd cut and weld to fit.

I'll have to look at my old photos. I did this a number of years back and don't recall having any problem with moving the engine around. I may have just used a ceiling joist and a chain fall when transferring it to the stand.

When I was done with the rebuild, I modified a boat trailer to serve as a test stand so I could fire it up and make the final adjustments. I used a pair of 4x4's for the engine bed and a 55 gallon drum as my seawater supply. It ended up paying off since I had to re-shim the oil pressure relief valve for proper pressure. I brought the engine to the boat on the trailer since it was already secured and easy to move. I loved that stand for making adjustments. Other than bolting the engine down and reattaching the piping, it was ready to go when I dropped it into the boat.
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Old 10-03-2020, 13:15   #10
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

I thought about attaching a chain hoist to an overhead joist in my garage, but I was a bit concerned about the load. I think my house uses those I-joists (or maybe the lattice-type). Can't tell unless I rip off some garage ceiling drywall and look. How would I attach the chain hoist to one of those flimsy, new-fangled joists?
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Old 10-03-2020, 13:52   #11
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

Send your wife shopping with at least a half an hours money ( a fortune with some women.. ) Borrow a piece of 4X4 or better still 6X6 CLEAN IT

Lay it on the Living room floor. Cut a neat hole beside one juist put a wire strop through the hole over the 6X6 and down the hole again hang the lift on it

NO NO DUMMY put the 4X4 at right angles to the Joists!!

Now comes the thinking how do you hide the hole in your Exotic Rug?

Pour your self a drink and think deeply Mike pope

Houses are usually built to hold up 40 Lbs / sq Ft while allowing the floor to deflect as much as one 360 th of the joist span (with no dry rot).
Good luck ! I moved the Coffee table but I did not even get the first drink finished!!!
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Old 10-03-2020, 14:01   #12
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

Rent the hoist. The ones I've rented at equipment yards have a much wider spread between the legs. You can probably rent one for a third of the cost of buying one, even from HF.
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Old 10-03-2020, 14:19   #13
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeighWebber View Post
I thought about attaching a chain hoist to an overhead joist in my garage, but I was a bit concerned about the load. I think my house uses those I-joists (or maybe the lattice-type). Can't tell unless I rip off some garage ceiling drywall and look. How would I attach the chain hoist to one of those flimsy, new-fangled joists?
I had a support beam, so it was easier for me to hook up the chain fall. I just had to throw a chain over the support beam between the floor joists.

Even if you have built up joists, you likely have a metal support beam in the middle of your garage carrying the ends of the floor joists. That can be a great place to tie on to.

If you have lattice joists or I-Joists and need to lift from mid-span, you need to connect the top flange and the bottom flange to your lifting point. If you are just pulling on the lower flange, the glue might fail and the bottom flange will break.

If this is something that you are going to use regularly, I'd fill in the web area with plywood, glued and screwed. for a single lift point, have the plywood extend at least two feet to either side of where you are going to mount the anchor ring. If you are conservative, rip down a 4x8 sheet and put 8' lengths in there. When the web is flush with the flange, through bolt the whole assembly in at least three spots. Add some strapping (1-1/2 inch wide) running from the top flange to the bottom at the ends and middle of the filler boards to tie the flanges together. These can be screwed to the flanges, two each side. In the middle, bolt on your lifting hook.

I don't know where you can buy a lifting hook, so I'd just bend some 3/8" rod in a "U" shape and weld it to some plate steel and through bolt the plates to the joist and filler.

If your garage had a drywall ceiling, as long as you make the lifting loop long enough, (4 inches or so), you should be able to put the drywall back up over the hole with just the loop sticking out, giving you a nice finished look and a permanent lift point.

The filler plywood that you are placing in-between the joist flanges will stiffen the joist and spread the load out over the length of plywood you put up there. Since the plywood on edge is very strong and will not bend, this adds a great deal of strength to the joist. The straps on the ends of the reinforcement are to tie everything together and make sure that you are not just pulling on glue joints. Tying the top flange to the bottom one with the straps makes the entire joist and reinforcement work together.

If that seems like too much work (house modification) for a one off project, screw some 2x4's to the ceiling running 90 degrees to the ceiling joists. If you have drywall, don't worry, just run the screws through the wood and drywall into the joists.

These 2x4's are only there to stabilize the lifting beam and to provide a gap for the chain.

Grab three 4x4's. Put the lifting beam (4x4) up against the ceiling 2x4's and put in a couple of toe-nailed screws to hold it in place. Carefully measure and cut the two support legs to carry the vertical load from the lifting beam to the garage floor. Tap them into place and toenail screw the tops. Throw your chain over the beam, add a chainfall and you are good to go. The 2x4's on the ceiling will hold the lift beam in place from any swing loads and the vertical 4x4's will carry the weight. When you are done, you can disassemble the beams and are only left with a couple of screw holes in your drywall.

No welding required. The wood is also easier to store than the engine crane.

Good luck.
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Old 10-03-2020, 14:27   #14
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

I have in the past put blocks under the engine stand so that the hoist frame can go under the engine stand. Do this in small increments and it works easy, like 1/2" at a time go back and forth between ends lengthwise.

Otherwise use a 3 leg engine stand they should be good for the weight.
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Old 10-03-2020, 18:16   #15
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Re: Transferring engine from hoist to stand

With what you have now, the easiest way would be to use a longer chain on the hoist, put the stand inbetween the hoist legs backwards and caddy-cornered, and slide the engine mount (that you're installed onto the bell housing after removing the flywheel) onto the engine stand. Would be easier with a friend to help.

I'd have saved the money on the hoist and bought the 1 ton chainfall for 60.00, and made an A-frame from a 10' - 2x12, 4 - 8' or 10' 4x4s, 2 - 12' 2 x 6s (for bracing) and a handfull of 3 inch screws for about 60-80.00 (but I have all that lying around anyway)

Then you could easily move it up and down and use the stand to move it around the shop.

If push came to shove (and you have low ceilings) you could cut the legs and use it inside the shop, and providing you don't have a high rise pickup, use cinder blocks to make up the difference when reloading it...
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