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Old 11-12-2020, 13:34   #31
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Re: Electric motors on a Woods Flica 34' sailing catamaran

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Originally Posted by sailor4life7777 View Post
Thanks for the suggestion and looks very interesting! But wouldn't I be able to get the same benefit of this hybrid engine with one electric motor and one diesel motor with comparable thrust? Are there any advantages to the 2 beta engines over the diesel/electric setup?

Thanks everyone for all the thoughtful tips and advice!!!
Redundancy with two systems......
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Old 12-12-2020, 08:02   #32
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Re: Electric motors on a Woods Flica 34' sailing catamaran

Thank you so much for the reply I really appreciate it!!

Just out of curiosity were you able to buy the stringers in such a large size? The largest I can find around me is 12' so unfortunately it's a lot of scarfing for me.

I agree with everything you said. Wood does take a lot of time but I heard foam core takes even longer! My understanding is that plywood /epoxy build is one of the fastest ways to build a boat. Please correct me if I'm wrong though!

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Originally Posted by Craig Cape Town View Post
Hi S4L. I couldn't figure how to paste pics in pm so I'll just reply here. Please excuse thread drift. I did the wood/epoxy build, as my dad had a woodwork joinery and that's the medium which I had most experience with at the time. Which method are you using?
If I were to build another cat, I'd look for a hurricane damaged hull for reconstruction or use the Derek Kelsall foam core method. Foam core results in a lighter build and glass has greater appeal when it comes time to sell. Wood takes a lot of time (construction, fairing, sheathing and painting).
I was lucky to have other boat builders around who gave me good advice. One in particular, who had just completed a 45 ft Simonis Cat (designer of the Leopard cat), convinced me to make some changes to the origional Woods plan. This is often where home builds go wrong, but having seen the Simonis boat, I thought it was a good idea.
Attachment 228386
I did not like the flat deck surfaces nor the hard chine of the gunnel on the woods cat, so we added curved tops to the bulkheads to reshape the deck and used strip plank to shape the gunnel before glassing over and under it.

Attachment 228387
I continued the stringers about another foot aft of the last little bulkhead to give room for transom steps. On the Woods design there's just a flat panel on the stern.
Attachment 228384
I made the stringers each in one continuous length instead of scarfing them on bit by bit. This made "the rib" cage curve evenly and gave the hull a natural continuous bend. We found that the stringers needed to be forced down onto the stem and the natural curve wanted the stem to be a little further forward. So we made the bow a foot longer by moving the stem forward.
Attachment 228388
This also made the trampoline area bigger. It's really small on the Woods plan. One other reason for doing this is that the woods bridge deck seemed too far forward and at greater risk of bridged deck slamming.
Plywood boxed channels were added underneath and glassed over as bridge deck stiffeners.
Attachment 228385
Here you can see the top of the bulkheads are curved to shape the deck. The extra foot in length makes the fore peak bunk space more useful.

You'll likely get a lot of nay sayers, thinking that you are crazy to build a boat, when there are so many good used boats available. They do have a valid argument. I took quite a knock when I sold as these boats don't have the same perceived value as production boats. If I had worked the same number of hours at a job instead of on the boat, I probably could have bought a used boat with the money earned. The costs add up and if you're doing a home build you need to crunch the numbers and watch you spending. My biggest mistake was renting a warehouse for construction. If you can find a barn or free space, then grab it as the build will usually take longer than you expect. I started by buying cloth and epoxy as I needed, which was quite expensive. Later I bought a 44gal drum of epoxy and full rolls (400ft) of cloth at wholesale prices (half of retail).
Feel free to bounce ideas off of me. Good luck.
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Old 13-12-2020, 01:16   #33
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Re: Electric motors on a Woods Flica 34' sailing catamaran

I made up the stringers by scarfing them together.
The Kelsall kiss method is way faster than wood as you don't have all the fairing to do. Its basically big panels that are tabbed together,something like stitch and glue method.
You can find more info here http://www.kelsall.com/UniqueKSS/WhatIsKSS.pdf
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Old 21-12-2020, 08:31   #34
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Re: Electric motors on a Woods Flica 34' sailing catamaran

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HI sailor4life.
Another alternative is to use outboards. Here they are on a small cat in Cape Town.
That sort of makes using the aft steps a bit of a problem.
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Old 21-12-2020, 09:26   #35
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Re: Electric motors on a Woods Flica 34' sailing catamaran

so far I have not fully understood what wants to be achieved "going electric" on a bluewater cruising boat:
environmental friendliness?
cost savings?
weight savings?
self sufficiency?

what else?
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Old 21-12-2020, 09:37   #36
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Re: Electric motors on a Woods Flica 34' sailing catamaran

An alternative position is bellow the bridge deck, drop down or in a nacelle.
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Old 21-12-2020, 16:22   #37
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Re: Electric motors on a Woods Flica 34' sailing catamaran

Plan for the worst, hope for the best. Keep it simple and light. All electric sounds great but real world intervenes. Check Jimmy Cornell's experience with an all electric cat and unlimited budget. He packed it in after the maiden voyage crossing from Europe to the Carribean.

Kudos for your optimism, but you need some offshore and passage making experience before spending $$$ on gear. Electric is expensive, heavy (big battery bank needed), and gives you very little cruising range.

Keep it light, keep it simple. Maybe a couple of outboards to start, see if you like passage making. You can refit inboards later. Leave the airfryer home. Think about a wind generator if you want to stay off Grid.
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