Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 09-07-2020, 11:17   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Kemah, TX
Boat: Lagoon 42
Posts: 23
Sailing through a large wake

Coming home up the shipping channel in Galveston Bay over the 4th of July weekend we came upon a large freighter travelling towards us and I could see his wake from a mile away. In a monohull I would point in to it and burst through it. It would be felt but for the most part the bow would split it and it was over. I did the same with our Lagoon 42 and it was quite a bump. The bows popped right up and slammed right down. I had plenty of time to notify the crew to expect some turbulence but even I didn't expect that much of a jolt. all is fine, just a loud noise. but it got me thinking if I could approach it better. I thought about running outside the channel before the ship got to us to let the wake weaken, but I was in an area where there is a lot of mess outside the channel so I decided to just keep going. I wouldn't want to take that wake in a monohull on the beam and figured I wouldn't want to do that in a catamaran either. But maybe I should? Or split the difference at 45 degrees?

looking to learn. thanks!
__________________

introverted is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 11:21   #2
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Rochester, NY
Boat: Chris Craft Catalina 381
Posts: 908
Re: Sailing through a large wake

How the boat will feel going through will depend not just on the size of the wake, but its steepness. It may be more comfortable to take it a bit of an angle so both hulls don't hit at the same time. And if it's a very steep wake and a fairly light cat, it might be more comfortable to slow the boat down a bit before you hit the wake.
__________________

rslifkin is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 11:28   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: North Carolina
Boat: Seaward 22
Posts: 824
Re: Sailing through a large wake

I have a pontoon boat and in that I prefer slightly less than 90 degrees. On my sailboat I go closer to 45 and try to slide on the wave more. hull shape makes a difference to your strategy.
ohdrinkboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 11:30   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Kemah, TX
Boat: Lagoon 42
Posts: 23
Re: Sailing through a large wake

Quote:
Originally Posted by rslifkin View Post
And if it's a very steep wake and a fairly light cat, it might be more comfortable to slow the boat down a bit before you hit the wake.
it was already light wind and by the time the freighter got to us, it had stolen most of what there was. I'd say we were going no more than 3 knots. I'll see about bearing off a little from the wake next time to make it more comfortable.
introverted is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 11:37   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2018
Boat: 50’ performance cruising cat, 50’ Gulfstar (under contract)
Posts: 2,719
Re: Sailing through a large wake

You go slowly and at 45 degrees.
Chotu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 11:49   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: ABC's
Boat: Prout Snowgoose 35
Posts: 1,613
Re: Sailing through a large wake

Unless in your dinghy, then you go full power perpendicular to it and enjoy the air time.

Dealt with a ****ton of wake on my small cat. Generally just slowing down works, the angles don't make much difference. Either way your being thrown around if the wake is large and steep enough, which it inevitably is.
mikedefieslife is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 12:35   #7
Registered User
 
Nicholson58's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Caribbean live aboard
Boat: Camper & Nicholson58 Ketch - ROXY Traverse City, Michigan No.668283
Posts: 4,786
Images: 84
Re: Sailing through a large wake

If can be nearly parallel to the wake you can take the wave one hull at a time. Works in our dinghy to avoid slapping and vaulting the wall of water. Distance is another way. In our monohull we do not deviate for ship wakes. Most well designed big ships leave surprisingly small wakes.

Heavily loaded ore carrier at ten knots. We were both RAM so passing pretty close.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	7EFF243D-7C42-468E-999F-04DFA884333D.jpg
Views:	121
Size:	418.2 KB
ID:	219019  
Nicholson58 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2020, 09:19   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 8
Re: Sailing through a large wake

The flatter the underside of the boat, the bigger the bang. Cat's will typically be flatter. I find 35-45 degree angle works, but depending on the angle and choppiness of the sea state, I might pay off to a greater angle as I pass the apex of the wake. The slam head-on brings all kind of other issues aside from scaring the crew.

It's good to practice for when you find yourself in blue water and the big waves are coming every 20 seconds. I was crossing the Drake Channel in the BVI's on a 40' Moorings Cat a few years ago and underestimated the winds/waves and so managing the angle became critical to a fast crossing. If taken head on, the Cat would slam and then stop almost dead in the water until boat speed was regained making it all the more uncomfortable for the passengers. Our friends, on a sister Cat and experiencing the same passage, managed to send their microwave across the cabin like it had been tossed by a linebacker.
Ranger58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2020, 10:05   #9
Marine Service Provider

Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Virgin Islands
Boat: 1999 Leopard 45, 45 foot cat, 1980 Hunter 33, 33 foot monohull
Posts: 1,018
Re: Sailing through a large wake

A "wake" typically consists of more than an individual wave. I will typically approach at a shallow angle, and right before meeting the first wave, turn hard into it. We will be getting close to perpendicular by the time we exit the last waves. The act of turning through the waves makes the period between crests change which limits the "pendulum effect" that really slams things around.
contrail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2020, 11:31   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 19,480
Re: Sailing through a large wake

I have some preferences.


1) If the wave is big, I try to show my stern to it (then there is less apparent speed).


2) If the wave is too close and big, I SLOW DOWN and avoid taking it at the right angle.


3) If I am forced to take it head on (see 2 above) I always run forward and close that foredeck hatch ...



I noticed some angle maybe about 20 degrees off the square helps limit the unpleasant results.


b.
barnakiel is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2020, 11:37   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 235
Re: Sailing through a large wake

On my present and past catamarans I take large wakes on a diagonal.
Think the longest distance across a rectangle from corner to corner.

The catamaran being the rectangle, lead into the wake/wave with the bows of one hull, it will begin to rise, then the second bow hits its buoyancy point and the wake wave exits the same lifting the transoms in order.
This is the softest way to pass over large wakes on a catamaran.
Paul Howard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2020, 11:43   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 1,698
Re: Sailing through a large wake

I donít like a wet deck and stuff flying , so I slow down and bear off
slug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2020, 11:50   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Boat in Greece, Beach cat in Israel
Boat: Lagoon 400 & Nacra 6.0 beach cat
Posts: 1,097
Re: Sailing through a large wake

Spending many years in the Israeli waters I have a ling experience with crossing steep & short waves. Also crossong wakes of various dailing vessels. I do remembers particular instance in Greece, crossing a wake if an 'armada' of Greek nave vessels. We crossed the wake may be 10 minutes after the vessels crossing and was still on the order if 7 feets high.
So, to the point:
Slow down (but keep steering speed, do not stop), it serves two purposes. Give the wake time to clam down and not slam into the wake wall.
Cross at about 30 deg to the wake.
On top of the wave/wake steer slightly off.
Avoid head on or beam to.
__________________
Mark, S/Y Bat-Yam
meirriba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2020, 12:01   #14
Registered User
 
mikereed100's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Cat in Chile, trawler in Ventura
Boat: 46' custom cat "Rum Doxy", Roughwater 41"Abreojos"
Posts: 1,861
Images: 2
Re: Sailing through a large wake

Rounding the Friars in Cabo San Lucas we were passed by a large tour cat and the wake took us on the beam. We were shaken so violently that I was worried about losing the rig. Since then I try my best to take wakes at an angle.
__________________
Mike

www.sailblogs.com/member/rumdoxy

Come to the dark side. We have cookies.
mikereed100 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2020, 17:40   #15
Registered User
 
LeeV's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Md
Boat: Lagoon 450F
Posts: 1,097
Re: Sailing through a large wake

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chotu View Post
You go slowly and at 45 degrees.
What he said!
__________________

__________________
LeeV
Lagoon 450 F
Momentum
LeeV is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
sail, sailing

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to pass large wire connectors through deck . Or cut and resplice Eastward ho 24 Construction, Maintenance & Refit 28 19-10-2018 07:18
Challenge: Wake Up The Mechanics - Outboard Challenge Ex-Calif Challenges 37 04-04-2016 08:55
How much Wake is "No Wake"? Hudson Force General Sailing Forum 90 27-06-2015 09:09
no wake/low wake zones shellback Rules of the Road, Regulations & Red Tape 39 30-06-2008 16:20
In Flinders' Wake markje4 Pacific & South China Sea 2 16-03-2007 23:30

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 15:03.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.