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Old 20-09-2021, 10:16   #76
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

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Originally Posted by LuvSun View Post

But Im looking at a corsair 37 or f36. Only thing I dont like i tillers, I much prefer a wheel and as some have said a bit of inclosed space for the cockpit. but no yacht is perfect.
Build this 39ft tri (#1 started) to have more space in the cockpit!
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Old 20-09-2021, 11:35   #77
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

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Originally Posted by ausnp84 View Post
Having owned monos and cats, the thought of a tri has intrigued me for our next boat.

Something like this https://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/1...uiser-3185709/

- Could it do offshore work?
- What payload could it take? Two people plus all their stuff? How about a dive comp and all the scuba gear?

We live entirely at anchor so marina fees aren’t a worry, and I’m absolutely a fair weather sailor with the occasional offshore passage, so it doesn’t need to be expedition-yacht worthy....

N
Having owned 2 Trimarans I can tell you based on your description of how you will use a Trimaran it’s very doable. First understand the loading. The Amas are great for storage of light bulky items. Toilet paper, Paper Towels, covers, oars and even Spinnakers. They are fundamentally small interiors. So you want to make sure you are ok with close quarters. The tramps offer a huge amount of lounging area and also an easy place to haul a dinghy up onto.

As to a tiller I personally prefer them for several reasons. You can buy a Tiller pilot for about $500us and the have remotes available. Toss it in the case a put it down below. When you want it just plug it in and drop the unit in place. 20 seconds. No complicated mechanisms.

They are fast and fast is fun. If you are doing 30knt trip figure 3 hours as opposed to 5-6 hours.

The big negative is the space in the main cabin. If you’re doing weekends occasional week you should be fine. If you are going on an extended cruise plan on going ashore frequently for food stuff. Not big galleys or refrig.
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Old 20-09-2021, 14:01   #78
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

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Originally Posted by Happ View Post
Having owned 2 Trimarans I can tell you based on your description of how you will use a Trimaran it’s very doable. First understand the loading. The Amas are great for storage of light bulky items. Toilet paper, Paper Towels, covers, oars and even Spinnakers. They are fundamentally small interiors. So you want to make sure you are ok with close quarters. The tramps offer a huge amount of lounging area and also an easy place to haul a dinghy up onto.

As to a tiller I personally prefer them for several reasons. You can buy a Tiller pilot for about $500us and the have remotes available. Toss it in the case a put it down below. When you want it just plug it in and drop the unit in place. 20 seconds. No complicated mechanisms.

They are fast and fast is fun. If you are doing 30knt trip figure 3 hours as opposed to 5-6 hours.

The big negative is the space in the main cabin. If you’re doing weekends occasional week you should be fine. If you are going on an extended cruise plan on going ashore frequently for food stuff. Not big galleys or refrig.
Thanks! Some really useful info there.

N
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Old 20-09-2021, 20:40   #79
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

Hello Don (dsanduril), good to hear from you again! For the folks who don't know, Don is the real deal. He knows of what he speaks. I knew him, and his folks a long time ago. The sister ship of ANDURIL ("Flaming Sword of the West" for those who are literate and appreciate Middle Earth), was docked next to me for several years. Norm Cross, designer of the Cross trimarans, was a gifted pioneer of early high performance Tris. Don, and his folks demonstrated that. Read their story, THERE AND BACK AGAIN, for confirmation.
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Old 22-09-2021, 06:39   #80
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

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…………
The big negative is the space in the main cabin. If you’re doing weekends occasional week you should be fine. If you are going on an extended cruise plan on going ashore frequently for food stuff. Not big galleys or refrig.
We sold my 4th trimaran 2 yrs ago (Corsair 36) and moved to a cat for that very reason. Factors: age (60s and tired of climbing down into the aft cockpit berth with almost no headroom), minimal cooking space (we love to cook) and comfort.
We went from one extreme to another! :-)
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Old 22-09-2021, 11:36   #81
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

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We sold my 4th trimaran 2 yrs ago (Corsair 36) and moved to a cat for that very reason. Factors: age (60s and tired of climbing down into the aft cockpit berth with almost no headroom), minimal cooking space (we love to cook) and comfort.
We went from one extreme to another! :-)

I feel the same way about cats versus other sailboats...... I don't need a 45 footer....not even close, but I want a cabin on the same level as the cockpit where I can take shelter when on a passage, and SEE. When anchored in some beautiful place, I don't want to live in a culvert! The factory built cat that best meets my criteria is the FP Maldives. At 32 feet it is in the size range I'm looking for, and has everything I want........ Big just eats money at every step of the way!!....... I don't need or want much, but I have my minimums. Richard Woods Vardo design would be even better.
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Old 23-09-2021, 02:20   #82
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

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I feel the same way about cats versus other sailboats...... I don't need a 45 footer....not even close, but I want a cabin on the same level as the cockpit where I can take shelter when on a passage, and SEE. When anchored in some beautiful place, I don't want to live in a culvert! The factory built cat that best meets my criteria is the FP Maldives. At 32 feet it is in the size range I'm looking for, and has everything I want........ Big just eats money at every step of the way!!....... I don't need or want much, but I have my minimums. Richard Woods Vardo design would be even better.
Interestingly enough, this is part of the reason our latest cat is 30ft... as much as I liked the space of the previous 42ft’er, it was just too big for the two of us frankly. Of course then we’ve just picked up another rescue dog so now the 30ft’er is a squeeze, but I was ready for a change in boats anyway! Haha

I don’t mind the cabin down aspects of mono’s / tri’s as we always have a cockpit enclosure, and for me one of the key things of living aboard is to spend lots of time outdoors / in the cockpit. I do miss the ability to go to windward as well whenever I want, which I’ve found in a cat to always be a compromise (punch into weather but deal with pounding).

Anyway, all food for thought. One week to go and we’re back living aboard, and we’ll keep an eye out for a big ol’ tri to have a poke around....

N
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Old 27-09-2021, 10:29   #83
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

I've been on some cats and own a Corsair 970 (32'), but I'm a noob in every sense of the word. I love our tri, but the usable space inside is smaller than our last pickup camper. I've slept on mine a number of times and it's not all that comfortable (you feel every ripple), but you do get used to it. The upsides, however, for us, outweigh the downs. Lots of outside living space. Ridiculously speedy and nimble. Tacks/jibes on a dime. Smiles for nautical miles. I could live aboard our boat, practicing a very spartan existence, but just me. For two, we would likely need a C37 or F39. Even then, long term living aboard would probably be challenging, but that's just us and something of a guess as I've never been on either. For our purposes, the 970 is the perfect boat for now. Looking forward to eventually island hopping the Bahamas and Caribbean with it, but due to work, that's a few years off. Our 970 seems a near ideal boat for that. Goal is to eventually end up with a Seawind 1260 once I pull the plug at work, but we shall see. We may find zipping around the Caribbean on our 970 is all we ever need to satisfy our aquatic desires. Okay, perhaps RORO it over to Spain some year too. If so, then we got into this whole cruising thing on the relative cheap.
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Old 27-09-2021, 14:55   #84
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

@deminimis you should look at a Dragonfly 1200. Much more comfortable than the C or F boats and beautifully finished. Sails like you'd expect of a tri.
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Old 27-09-2021, 15:05   #85
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

Thanks but not for us. Next boat will likely be a Seawind. Love the 970. Great intro to multis, it serves us well and suspect it will serve us well for the next few years. We do trailer (with plans to trailer to Fla in another year), so a DF would not work for that. Plus, $$.
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Old 03-10-2021, 10:00   #86
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

There is a newly listed trimaran... East Coast Yacht Sales. Marples CC-40 FC. Might be worth a look...

Full disclosure; It is our boat. Circumstances forced us to list her. She is a beauty IMHO.
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Old 03-10-2021, 18:36   #87
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

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Build this 39ft tri (#1 started) to have more space in the cockpit!
I have pwned a Corsair and the negative I had was I couldn’t leave it in the water folded. When folded the sides of the Amas are in the water. You have to put bottom paint on the side of the Amas or you’ll get fouling.
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Old 03-10-2021, 23:59   #88
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

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Originally Posted by Happ View Post
I have pwned a Corsair and the negative I had was I couldn’t leave it in the water folded. When folded the sides of the Amas are in the water. You have to put bottom paint on the side of the Amas or you’ll get fouling.
Hello, HAPP!

I do not know why You quoted MY message, but for good order sake will advise that pictured boat is NOT a Corsair (and not folding at all). This is a rigid fast offshore tri with extended cockpit for a crew safety and convenience.

Folding tris I guess are mainly intended for trailerability, although some systems (Dragonfly, as one of examples) are perfect for berthing at limited room.

There is no Corsair fault one can try to minimize berthing costs by means of folding their tris in water and having problems with fouling thereafter. Probably another place should be found for that with small crane able to haul the boat out for folded dry storage.

I personally took folding tris as perfect boats for a coastal sailing or, say in the Med where one can reach a "land" within one day sailing having fun and under perfect weather conditions.

FAIR WINDS!
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Old 21-10-2021, 09:10   #89
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

Our experience cruising on our two-year-old Corsair 37:

We spent a total of more than 3 months on the boat this summer and fall, covering sailing grounds between Maine and the Chesapeake. We feel it’s a great option for cruising, mainly in that you can actually sail from one place to another thanks to the Corsair’s speed and light-wind capabilities -- we could easily do 30-40 miles in a day, with several 70-80 mile days thrown in as well as two overnight passages. One of the big revelations to me this summer is that it seemed like A LOT of sailboat cruisers don’t sail, they motor-sail or motor most of the time. We sailed at least 90% of the time--whenever the wind was over 5-6 kts sailing is faster than motoring, so why not. (Not to mention motoring with an outboard in tall, choppy seas really sucks.) I love that as we’re doing 10 knots we’re relaxed and comfortable, not heeled way over. Another plus is the ability to navigate and anchor in shallow water -- it really opened up more options for anchoring. When we anchor or moor for the night (we were very rarely on a dock) we will usually rig the bridle which makes us ride much more comfortably. We get about in a 12-foot Kaboat with a 2.5hp outboard, which we can pull up on the tramp when we’re under way.

On the other hand, it’s true there is not a lot of room on board compared to other boats of similar size. We are kind of minimalists to begin with -- as long as I can have my coffee with half and half every morning, I can put up with a lot of going without. But really, there’s a nice main cabin with great visibility, an enclosed head, and two separate sleeping quarters -- what we’re really missing is storage space. We hosted a number of overnight guests who stayed multiple nights, but I’d say it’s best if they’re family or really, really good friends. Having all the tramp space to spread out on and a tarp to rig over the cockpit in wet weather (we also have dodger and bimini) really helped create some elbow room.

The whole question of being able to fold up to fit into berths is a non-issue. We haven’t done that yet and found out why when we went to fold up before getting lifted out to be put on the hard last weekend -- it’s a bit of a process when the boat is a loaded cruiser. It took 6 big guys standing on the one ama we’d managed to fold to get the other one to cooperate. Maybe we just need more practice but it just seemed like way more trouble than it’s worth to do regularly. But yes, foldability is crucial for saving money and increasing your options for storage and transportation. Technically it’s trailerable, but not even remotely in the same way as an 760, 880, or even 970. And you need a crane for mast removal.

Right now Corsair is positioning the 37 as an “offshore racer,” which is a real head-scratcher. It seems like it’s the only long(ish)-term cruising option in the Corsair lineup. I wouldn’t want to live on it full-time but it's great for up to 2 months at a time.

Catherine
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Old 22-10-2021, 09:26   #90
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Re: Advice on Trimarans

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Our experience cruising on our two-year-old Corsair 37:



We spent a total of more than 3 months on the boat this summer and fall, covering sailing grounds between Maine and the Chesapeake. We feel it’s a great option for cruising, mainly in that you can actually sail from one place to another thanks to the Corsair’s speed and light-wind capabilities -- we could easily do 30-40 miles in a day, with several 70-80 mile days thrown in as well as two overnight passages. One of the big revelations to me this summer is that it seemed like A LOT of sailboat cruisers don’t sail, they motor-sail or motor most of the time. We sailed at least 90% of the time--whenever the wind was over 5-6 kts sailing is faster than motoring, so why not. (Not to mention motoring with an outboard in tall, choppy seas really sucks.) I love that as we’re doing 10 knots we’re relaxed and comfortable, not heeled way over. Another plus is the ability to navigate and anchor in shallow water -- it really opened up more options for anchoring. When we anchor or moor for the night (we were very rarely on a dock) we will usually rig the bridle which makes us ride much more comfortably. We get about in a 12-foot Kaboat with a 2.5hp outboard, which we can pull up on the tramp when we’re under way.



On the other hand, it’s true there is not a lot of room on board compared to other boats of similar size. We are kind of minimalists to begin with -- as long as I can have my coffee with half and half every morning, I can put up with a lot of going without. But really, there’s a nice main cabin with great visibility, an enclosed head, and two separate sleeping quarters -- what we’re really missing is storage space. We hosted a number of overnight guests who stayed multiple nights, but I’d say it’s best if they’re family or really, really good friends. Having all the tramp space to spread out on and a tarp to rig over the cockpit in wet weather (we also have dodger and bimini) really helped create some elbow room.



The whole question of being able to fold up to fit into berths is a non-issue. We haven’t done that yet and found out why when we went to fold up before getting lifted out to be put on the hard last weekend -- it’s a bit of a process when the boat is a loaded cruiser. It took 6 big guys standing on the one ama we’d managed to fold to get the other one to cooperate. Maybe we just need more practice but it just seemed like way more trouble than it’s worth to do regularly. But yes, foldability is crucial for saving money and increasing your options for storage and transportation. Technically it’s trailerable, but not even remotely in the same way as an 760, 880, or even 970. And you need a crane for mast removal.



Right now Corsair is positioning the 37 as an “offshore racer,” which is a real head-scratcher. It seems like it’s the only long(ish)-term cruising option in the Corsair lineup. I wouldn’t want to live on it full-time but it's great for up to 2 months at a time.



Catherine

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Warning Will Robinson! We hadn’t used our Kaboat in a couple years and we recently brought it to the boat to use it this season. All the seams were literally coming apart. The fins fell off. The grab handles fell off. It was like it wasn’t even bonded together. Other than that, we loved the boat! [emoji23]
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