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Old 17-10-2020, 00:41   #76
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

In 1969 I bought 'Voyaging under Sail' by Hiscock. There was a photo of 'Vertue 35'.... that did it for me. Bought mine in 1984.... with the 'long range cruising' deckhouse ... similar to what 'Icebird' has...rather than the poncey dog box designed for the US market.

Brilliant little ship....
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Old 17-10-2020, 00:43   #77
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

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Linear galley, starboard side...
Likewise. And having two heads means we usually have one available while we work on whichever one is broken....
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Old 17-10-2020, 10:00   #78
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

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Originally Posted by Yihang View Post
Personally I think a safe seagoing galley can designed on other side and in either format.
I think youíve mentioned you are an architect. Not sure if a marine architect or a sailor but marine architects and sailors know few things:

1. The more you move to the boat front, the more movements there are - not ideal for cooking
2. U shape galleys were designed for a reason. Providing the best support and are pulled as aft as possible and close to the companionway.

A linear galley is a very bad compromise with boats that need two separate aft berths - for most boats under 50í these canít be called cabins.

Port or stbd U shape galley of course make no difference.
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Old 17-10-2020, 11:01   #79
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

OP chiming in again——

I want to thank everyone again for their input. I am benefitting immensely from your shared experiences.

I want to restate some of the parameters of our intended use, in the hope that it will help guide feedback:

For 95% of the time it will be me, my wife, and our 8yo son on the boat. We only really want two cabins that can have closed doors for privacy, and ours would need to be bigger.

We plan to live aboard the vessel for several months moored in a marina while we build a modest house for ourselves on our property. During that time we are likely to be too busy to take it out cruising, whether for a day or a week. We will not be crossing any oceans. When we do go out cruising, I don't really anticipate us doing anything that would require sleeping in shifts or preparing hot food from scratch while underway, especially under sail or in choppy waters. We just love being on the water, it's a cheaper and surprisingly more practical alternative to renting a place, and we're not here to win any p—ing contests about having sea salt in our veins.

My wife likes the lengthwise galley layout because it's open and she's tall; no hitting your head or having to reach into awkward waist-high spaces in order to work; we often cook together, which is impossible in a cramped corner. I certainly see the advantages of a U-shaped galley (I cook too), especially at sea, but you know what they say about happy partners and again, please look at how we'll actually be using our time.

Thanks again! I'll respond to individual replies as time permits.
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Old 17-10-2020, 11:33   #80
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

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Originally Posted by DeValency View Post
I think youíve mentioned you are an architect. Not sure if a marine architect or a sailor but marine architects and sailors know few things:

1. The more you move to the boat front, the more movements there are - not ideal for cooking
2. U shape galleys were designed for a reason. Providing the best support and are pulled as aft as possible and close to the companionway.

A linear galley is a very bad compromise with boats that need two separate aft berths - for most boats under 50í these canít be called cabins.

Port or stbd U shape galley of course make no difference.
"The more you move to the boat front, the more movements there are - not ideal for cooking" INCORRECT. The closer you are to midships, the less motion there is.
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Old 17-10-2020, 11:48   #81
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

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Originally Posted by Yihang View Post

All the Catalinas i've been on seem to have it on the port side too. ......................
........................

C22 - s
C25 - p

C27 - p (two layouts, one aft, one linear)
C30 - p
C320 - p
C34 - s
C36 - p (like a C30)
C38 - p (S&S design)
C42 - both (p w/aft gally, s with linear)
C470 - ?


Not all of 'em.
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Old 17-10-2020, 17:15   #82
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What other sailboats have THIS layout?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeValency View Post
I think youíve mentioned you are an architect. Not sure if a marine architect or a sailor but marine architects and sailors know few things:



1. The more you move to the boat front, the more movements there are - not ideal for cooking

2. U shape galleys were designed for a reason. Providing the best support and are pulled as aft as possible and close to the companionway.



A linear galley is a very bad compromise with boats that need two separate aft berths - for most boats under 50í these canít be called cabins.



Port or stbd U shape galley of course make no difference.


Im noticing people with linear galleys merely point out they can work as well. Where as some diehard ushape fans will not accept anything else.

I suppose that limits your boat selection then. Most of the larger ovnis, boreal, allures, nordship, sirius, and many other proven blue water cruisers were simply not designed by sailors because they have linear galleys?

I guess that leaves island packets and tartans. Good boats.

Also, by your definition jimmy cornell must be a hack because he chose an ovni and then a garcia exploration with linear galleys.
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Old 17-10-2020, 17:42   #83
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

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Originally Posted by Stu Jackson View Post
C22 - s
C25 - p

C27 - p (two layouts, one aft, one linear)
C30 - p
C320 - p
C34 - s
C36 - p (like a C30)
C38 - p (S&S design)
C42 - both (p w/aft gally, s with linear)
C470 - ?


Not all of 'em.


No, not all of them. Just the ones iíve been on, the 30 32 and 36. Thanks for the list. Port side sure seems popular though.
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Old 17-10-2020, 22:16   #84
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeValency View Post
I think youíve mentioned you are an architect. Not sure if a marine architect or a sailor but marine architects and sailors know few things:

1. The more you move to the boat front, the more movements there are - not ideal for cooking
2. U shape galleys were designed for a reason. Providing the best support and are pulled as aft as possible and close to the companionway.

A linear galley is a very bad compromise with boats that need two separate aft berths - for most boats under 50í these canít be called cabins.

Port or stbd U shape galley of course make no difference.
Some notions:
1. true, if you sail against the wind. Reaching and running it's away from midship.
2. Things are not that simple. U-galley needs beam. To be any "safer" U should not be open to midship and anything less than 4.2m/14' and it's allmost impossible without severing something else. There's place only for one in the galley. Nowhere to duck (in most U-galleys) if something on the stowe gets ballistic. Difficult to use lower cabinets.

And port/stbd makes a difference becouse stbd tack is stand on and the lee side is more stable. Cook will be very angry if you change the tack while cooking. So port is the place for galley..
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Old 23-10-2020, 03:33   #85
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

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Some notions:
1. true, if you sail against the wind. Reaching and running it's away from midship.
2. Things are not that simple. U-galley needs beam. To be any "safer" U should not be open to midship and anything less than 4.2m/14' and it's allmost impossible without severing something else. There's place only for one in the galley. Nowhere to duck (in most U-galleys) if something on the stowe gets ballistic. Difficult to use lower cabinets.

And port/stbd makes a difference becouse stbd tack is stand on and the lee side is more stable. Cook will be very angry if you change the tack while cooking. So port is the place for galley..
OP here, with another gentle reminder that while I think it's super awesome of you all to decide now's the time to debate the merits of various galley layouts based on a scenario in which some poor maritime chef is furiously cooking omelets in the middle of a regatta, this is totally irrelevant to this thread.

Instead of considering food prep when the boat is running/reaching/hauling, think about this interesting (and vastly more on-topic) scenario: it's made fast to a 40' slip at no fewer than three points in a protected marina for, like, four months. After that it's taken out to sea for maybe six to 36 hours at a time, probably never under sail for more than two or three hours at a stretch.

The information I needed in the first place was given much earlier, that the layout my wife and I were interested in turned out to be more common on charters and therefore potentially indicative of other problems in the boat, not the layout itself. I'm now interested in viable alternatives to suit OUR purposes, and with earnestly due respect, not yours.
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Old 23-10-2020, 06:17   #86
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

My 2010 3 cabin Jeanneau SO 44i, has this exact layout. We day sail off our mooring mostly when we move the vessel ( 30-40 days a season) It falls into the coastal cruiser category, it is fast in its own right but we do not race. The cockpit is verry spacious in comparison to most other vessels we take advantage of that, most of our meals are spent in the cockpit enjoying the views from our mooring field.
It is very capable of making passage, it may not be designed for that, but it is certainly capable. I can give you the skinny on the displacement, righting moment, sail plan and other technical things but you can also get that stuff from
https://sailboatdata.com/
Trimmed correctly on a beam reach my 44i has done 9.5 knots with 20 knots of wind, she will move at 4-5 knots With 10-12 knots of wind.
Ample water holds 100 gal bow,65 gal stern,3x25 gal black water, 57 gal fuel will get you 400 miles at 7 knots.
Stable and heavy enough to not feel some one walking port to starboard.
It is a production line vessel from group Finot, (the largest vessel building conglomerate in the world), Once you establish A resource you should be able to find replacement parts without issue for any vessel in the group.
You need any other feedback on this vessel PM me.

(This site is a great resource, there are a lot of individuals that contribute, please donít be discouraged by the not on topic or negative posts, thatís on them

Good luck
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Old 23-10-2020, 08:35   #87
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

I’d say most three cabin production boats have that layout. Hunter, Catalina, Beneteau, Jeanneau, etc. if you go a little bigger the galley moves aft to the bottom of the companionway stairs and access to an aft cabin is through the galley. We are fond of our two cabin Beneteau 423 as the galley as aft instead of in the salon and there is a big deep locker that is excellent for storing inflatable dinghy and other stuff, we rarely miss the 3rd cabin.
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Old 23-10-2020, 08:43   #88
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
"The more you move to the boat front, the more movements there are - not ideal for cooking"

INCORRECT. The closer you are to midships, the less motion there is.
And a U-Shaped galley is closer to midships (generally). The are just over, or slightly to stern, of the keel - the centring weight (righting moment) of a sailboat.

DeValency is CORRECT.

Warmly,
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Old 23-10-2020, 09:01   #89
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

There’s just no way to stop a runaway train...
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Old 23-10-2020, 15:02   #90
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Re: What other sailboats have THIS layout?

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Originally Posted by Kd9truck View Post
Stable and heavy enough to not feel some one walking port to starboard.
It is a production line vessel from group Finot, (the largest vessel building conglomerate in the world), Once you establish A resource you should be able to find replacement parts without issue for any vessel in the group.
You need any other feedback on this vessel PM me.

(This site is a great resource, there are a lot of individuals that contribute, please donít be discouraged by the not on topic or negative posts, thatís on them

Good luck
Hah, thank you! I do not begrudge gearheads their joys, but I may grumble a little about having to wade through them. I repeat my statements of gratitude to all who have replied.
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