Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 23-02-2019, 06:09   #31
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: at home
Boat: no longer cf member
Posts: 327
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

[QUOTE=robinco;2824786]A local experienced boat builder reputedly made a suggestion of glassing directly over the top of the teak without removing it first.

A really, really, really bad idea. One of the worst idea's I have heard in fact. Seriously, I would have to think real hard on coming up with worse ideas....lol, could be a new thread!
Allied39 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-02-2019, 10:18   #32
Registered User

Join Date: May 2015
Location: Italy
Posts: 126
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Sky View Post
I crewed on a Celestial 48 ketch last summer that had replaced the original teak deck with decking made of cork. Strips and black caulking, in sheet form. At a distance it was hard to tell it wasn’t real teak. Very grippy, cool and soft on bare feet. It was a few years old and it looked good.

Last summer I sailed on a boat with a deckin made of cork.
I can only agree

This was the brand of the deck of the boat I sailed
https://www.marinecork.com/
No prob for the liguage, you can have an e-mail correspondence in english.

But don't forget what others told before,the most part of the costs are:
- Remove the existing decking.
- Fittings to the new deck (whatever the type of material you will use)
So the costs of material has a minimal impact

But you have also to consider that cork requires infinitely less maintenance than teak
Yellow bird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2019, 09:20   #33
Registered User
 
Amapola's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Florida
Boat: Matlack, Trawler, 48 ft
Posts: 912
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

We removed the teak on our Tayana 37 and it was a bear. I didn't count but it seemed like we removed 1000 screws. We had to chisel the teak from the deck. There were numerous places where the deck had rotted due to rot at the screw holes. Once we removed the teak, we hired a professional to put down the non-skid decking. No regrets but a lot of hard work.
__________________
The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever.
—Jacques Yves Costeau
Amapola is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2019, 09:30   #34
Registered User
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 23,128
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amapola View Post
We removed the teak on our Tayana 37 and it was a bear. I didn't count but it seemed like we removed 1000 screws. We had to chisel the teak from the deck. There were numerous places where the deck had rotted due to rot at the screw holes. Once we removed the teak, we hired a professional to put down the non-skid decking. No regrets but a lot of hard work.
I often wonder, even if a deck is water saturated, it may be stronger with that 5/8-3/4" of teak on it than a normal deck!
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2019, 14:21   #35
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: NJ
Boat: Dickerson Ketch
Posts: 94
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

I have a 83 Dickerson Ketch. At purchase, had the prior owner pay to have the teak deck removed. Boat sat indoors all winter with heat lamps to dry out over a thousand drilled holes. They then laid 2 layers of new mat and fiberglass and painted it. He paid 10K. That summer I taped out the deck and applied a painted non-skid to it. Took 1 weekend. Still looks great. Now considering a fake teak called nu-teak.
JBsurfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2019, 15:19   #36
Registered User
 
Jon Hacking's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Currently cruising the Philippines, just got back from PNG & Solomons
Boat: Wauquiez 45' (now 48') catamaran
Posts: 764
Images: 1
Send a message via Skype™ to Jon Hacking
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

We did this in Phuket 5 years ago as part of a major refit: removed our teak decks, repaired the decks, glassed 'em up, & laid down non-skid. We wanted our decks to look like factory, & have found that painted on non-skid often looks dirty after a while. So we made non-skid (diamond pattern) panels, cut them out, & stuck them down, making sure all the diamonds aligned across neighboring panels. A huge job, but we're very happy with the results. It's documented in the daily blog we did at the time, & I've also started to build a page on just the deck work. The page still needs work, but the links to the blog pages are all good. Rebuild Decks
__________________
-- Jon Hacking s/v Ocelot
Jon Hacking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2019, 19:48   #37
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: wherever
Boat: Cheoy Lee 47 CC
Posts: 878
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

No way I'd do that. Too much walk between layers.
lifeofreilly57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2019, 20:00   #38
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: wherever
Boat: Cheoy Lee 47 CC
Posts: 878
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

Just did this last summer on my 47 Cheoy Lee. Stripped the teak, removed 2000 screws and ground off the compromised gelcoat. Laid down 25 yards of 1708 fiberglass and 7 gallons ns of vinylester resin.
Two part epoxy paint, another coat of epoxy paint with nonskid and done
About 250 hours labor and $3000.00 in materials to complete. I also lost 30 pounds and 4 inches off my waist. It was the hottest summer on record I'm MA.
If I had a contractor do it the price would've been around $45,000.oo. No one in their right mind working for someone else would grind as fast as an owner would.
You might want to consider the alternatives before jumping in.i was fortunate, there was no core damage to deal with.
lifeofreilly57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2019, 11:33   #39
Registered User
 
VChild's Avatar

Join Date: May 2013
Location: Florida
Boat: Lord Nelson, 41
Posts: 87
Images: 1
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

Your boat better be a real keeper if you plan to take an older classic vessel and restore the teak decks. If you’re paying someone else to do the entire job, then it’s probably one of those things where “if you have to ask the price, then you probably can’t afford it”. There are just too many unknown variables. You could get a price on removing the teak or do that yourself. That’s the “easy” part. It’s simple but time consuming. The big issue is what is underneath.
My project on my Lord Nelson 41 was quite extensive. It involved removing all deck hardware, mast, rigging, winches, main traveler, staysail tracks, mast pulpits, bowsprit, windlass, hand rails, life-line stanchions, deck fill and pump-out fittings, helm pedestal and wiring etc.
Then all the teak was removed. In a way I was lucky. Lord Nelsons are fairly unique in their teak installation method. The original teak decks were screwed down but all screws went into underlying fiberglass stringers rather than coring. So I did not run into any coring problems.
Another place where I got lucky was that all hardware was attached by SS machine screws threaded into SS plates that were embedded into the fiberglass. So I didn’t have to access anything from inside the cabin, for instance dropping a ceiling panel.
However, even screwing the deck into solid glass doesn’t eliminate all problems 30+ years down the road. I found extensive areas by hammer tapping the deck where the top 1/16”-1/8” of the deck had slight delaminations around the screw holes. Because I wanted a 100% solid foundation for the new teak to be epoxied to, the easiest route was to use a diamond bit gelcoat shaver and remove the deck surface all the way down to solid glass. Essentially removing the top 1/8” of the entire deck.
Then a new layer of glass/epoxy was laid down to bring the deck back up to the original height.
Next came the filling and fairing process which included not just the decks but also the cabin roof and gunwales to remove all dings, scratches and imperfections. The filling and fairing process took the longest. Just depends on how pretty you want it to be. I wanted mine to look like a new boat.
Then came the primer followed by the marine finish coats for all the non-teak areas.
Finally, the new teak was installed using epoxy (no screws).
Currently I’m getting ready to reinstall all the removed hardware back onto the deck after a thorough polishing (couldn’t tolerate putting blemished stainless next to new teak).
This has taken me a year and a half so far due to weather windows. Granted, my boat has a lot of teak and I wanted to restore it to “like new” condition. I’ve done some of the grunt work myself but paid for most of the skilled professional work. My best guess is that if I had paid for everything including the grunt work, the total cost would be about $110k. Of that, probably $35-40k just for the high quality Burmese teak installation, labor and materials (not the removal or prep work).
Hope that helps.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	p1.jpg
Views:	98
Size:	423.7 KB
ID:	186983   Click image for larger version

Name:	p4m.jpg
Views:	100
Size:	416.5 KB
ID:	186984  

Click image for larger version

Name:	p7m.jpg
Views:	101
Size:	397.0 KB
ID:	186985   Click image for larger version

Name:	p9m.jpg
Views:	95
Size:	406.5 KB
ID:	186986  

Click image for larger version

Name:	p11m.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	406.8 KB
ID:	186987   Click image for larger version

Name:	p12m.jpg
Views:	103
Size:	395.1 KB
ID:	186988  

Click image for larger version

Name:	p14m.jpg
Views:	92
Size:	337.8 KB
ID:	186989   Click image for larger version

Name:	p23m.jpg
Views:	90
Size:	198.5 KB
ID:	186990  

Click image for larger version

Name:	p25m.jpg
Views:	93
Size:	301.1 KB
ID:	186991   Click image for larger version

Name:	p27.jpg
Views:	95
Size:	422.3 KB
ID:	186992  

Click image for larger version

Name:	p30m.jpg
Views:	91
Size:	374.5 KB
ID:	186993   Click image for larger version

Name:	p31m.jpg
Views:	100
Size:	361.9 KB
ID:	186994  

VChild is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 20-07-2019, 17:31   #40
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 41
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

John's article on this topic is attached.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Crusing World Teak Decks JK .pdf (454.5 KB, 40 views)
badadim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-07-2019, 04:55   #41
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: wherever
Boat: Cheoy Lee 47 CC
Posts: 878
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

Thanks for the run through, I feel better now. I removed the teak decks my boat, including grinding the gelcoat and adding a layer of glass. Then primer, paint and nonskid. I just couldn't justify replacing with new teak.
All told, it was about $3000.00 in materials but untold hours of labor on my part. About 6 straight weeks of 14 hour days. No days off.
Better really love a boat or get it for a good price if your going that route.
Quote:
Originally Posted by VChild View Post
Your boat better be a real keeper if you plan to take an older classic vessel and restore the teak decks. If you’re paying someone else to do the entire job, then it’s probably one of those things where “if you have to ask the price, then you probably can’t afford it”. There are just too many unknown variables. You could get a price on removing the teak or do that yourself. That’s the “easy” part. It’s simple but time consuming. The big issue is what is underneath.
My project on my Lord Nelson 41 was quite extensive. It involved removing all deck hardware, mast, rigging, winches, main traveler, staysail tracks, mast pulpits, bowsprit, windlass, hand rails, life-line stanchions, deck fill and pump-out fittings, helm pedestal and wiring etc.
Then all the teak was removed. In a way I was lucky. Lord Nelsons are fairly unique in their teak installation method. The original teak decks were screwed down but all screws went into underlying fiberglass stringers rather than coring. So I did not run into any coring problems.
Another place where I got lucky was that all hardware was attached by SS machine screws threaded into SS plates that were embedded into the fiberglass. So I didn’t have to access anything from inside the cabin, for instance dropping a ceiling panel.
However, even screwing the deck into solid glass doesn’t eliminate all problems 30+ years down the road. I found extensive areas by hammer tapping the deck where the top 1/16”-1/8” of the deck had slight delaminations around the screw holes. Because I wanted a 100% solid foundation for the new teak to be epoxied to, the easiest route was to use a diamond bit gelcoat shaver and remove the deck surface all the way down to solid glass. Essentially removing the top 1/8” of the entire deck.
Then a new layer of glass/epoxy was laid down to bring the deck back up to the original height.
Next came the filling and fairing process which included not just the decks but also the cabin roof and gunwales to remove all dings, scratches and imperfections. The filling and fairing process took the longest. Just depends on how pretty you want it to be. I wanted mine to look like a new boat.
Then came the primer followed by the marine finish coats for all the non-teak areas.
Finally, the new teak was installed using epoxy (no screws).
Currently I’m getting ready to reinstall all the removed hardware back onto the deck after a thorough polishing (couldn’t tolerate putting blemished stainless next to new teak).
This has taken me a year and a half so far due to weather windows. Granted, my boat has a lot of teak and I wanted to restore it to “like new” condition. I’ve done some of the grunt work myself but paid for most of the skilled professional work. My best guess is that if I had paid for everything including the grunt work, the total cost would be about $110k. Of that, probably $35-40k just for the high quality Burmese teak installation, labor and materials (not the removal or prep work).
Hope that helps.
lifeofreilly57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-07-2019, 04:56   #42
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: wherever
Boat: Cheoy Lee 47 CC
Posts: 878
Re: teak deck removal - change to non-skid fiberglass

By the way. Beautiful job on that teak replacement.
lifeofreilly57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
deck, fiberglass, removal, teak, teak deck

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
non skid fiberglass deck panels sailing alice Monohull Sailboats 0 24-10-2018 12:14
Teak Deck Removal and Fiberglass Help Requested. Troutslayer Construction, Maintenance & Refit 12 19-10-2018 13:10
Teak deck replace with non- skid in Mexico? Baltictim Construction, Maintenance & Refit 3 29-11-2017 07:09
Non skid sand deckpaint removal paultux General Sailing Forum 1 31-10-2016 07:11
Non Skid Removal and Repaint UnsafeSailor Construction, Maintenance & Refit 10 11-11-2013 07:17

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 16:31.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.