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Old 05-12-2016, 17:57   #46
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

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Originally Posted by scottorious View Post
Good call on the insurance. Sv seeker on YouTube has some good looking anchors I saw.

I understand all the points said, I'll have to be really careful with it.

Synthetic rigging seems really diy.

I've seen some diy windvane designs, anyone have good input on that?

Has anyone used 12 volt self contained refrigerators?

Does anyone build sails? That one seems beyond my ability.
Not a good call on insurance. Why in the world would you ever open that can of worms? Some of you folks are so wedded to ''playing it by the book'' that you shoot yourself in the foot. Do you suppose the insurance company is going to send out an investigator to examine your anchor?
Go to a marine supply store and measure-up an anchor and build the damn thing, it is not rocket science. You can't have too many anchors on board. Yes, you can build just about anything if you have the right skills. Including sails, goggle ''sailright sails''.
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Old 05-12-2016, 18:06   #47
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

If you feel you can fabricate it and make it as safe and effective as a manufactured one then I say go for it. I fabricate as much as possible for the projects I do so I know the sense of satisfaction doing it yourself. And if you can save 2/3 the cost then it is a bonus. I think most people don't do it more because they just don't posses the skills or the equipment. For many things purchasing the tooling required would kill the value equation. The one thing you should factor in though is the fact that if your self made anchor does not perform well you may have to create version 2, and then it may not be very cost effective.

As far as gas fueled engines on boats I thing the safety aspect is blown way out of proportion. Just make sure your entire fuels system is in excellent shape, and check it regularly. Start your bulge fan 5 minutes before starting your engine, and verify that you can hear it working and always have a fume alarm. There are hundreds of thousands of gas powerboats used safely everyday. The main advantage of diesel is economy, range, and longevity.
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Old 05-12-2016, 18:09   #48
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

Yes, we can do without the tutorial.

We all know the challenges - one must simply pay attention. As you so kindly noted - we all got rid of the highly dangerous heavier than air gasoline fumes and replaced them with the benign propane fumes.
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Old 05-12-2016, 18:18   #49
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

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Yes, we can do without the tutorial.

We all know the challenges - one must simply pay attention. As you so kindly noted - we all got rid of the highly dangerous heavier than air gasoline fumes and replaced them with the benign propane fumes.
COBG. I KNEW ALREADY that you didn't need the tutorial. But not everyone is a clued up as you.
If only one fire in the next 20 years is averted by my rant then it was worth your critisism. And I don't mind at all.
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Old 05-12-2016, 18:35   #50
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

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Yes, we can do without the tutorial.

We all know the challenges - one must simply pay attention. As you so kindly noted - we all got rid of the highly dangerous heavier than air gasoline fumes and replaced them with the benign propane fumes.
Propane is in a dedicated locker dumping overboard.... Not sure how you do that with gasoline fumes


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Old 05-12-2016, 19:51   #51
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

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Propane is in a dedicated locker dumping overboard.... Not sure how you do that with gasoline fumes


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So, one should pay attention. Why didn't I think of that?
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Old 05-12-2016, 19:55   #52
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

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COBG. I KNEW ALREADY that you didn't need the tutorial. But not everyone is a clued up as you.
If only one fire in the next 20 years is averted by my rant then it was worth your critisism. And I don't mind at all.

Thousands of boats have had gas onboard engines. I've been around for 60 years and can count on one hand gasoline related explosions on boats. I'd be worried more about an electrical fire or a grease fire in the galley.

Your comment may help folks to pay closer attention. I'll stick with my wonderful little A4.
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Old 05-12-2016, 20:14   #53
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

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Originally Posted by crazyoldboatguy View Post
Thousands of boats have had gas onboard engines. I've been around for 60 years and can count on one hand gasoline related explosions on boats. I'd be worried more about an electrical fire or a grease fire in the galley.

Your comment may help folks to pay closer attention. I'll stick with my wonderful little A4.
I agree COBG, cooking fires AND electrical fires are probably more prevalent than gasoline fires.
And if I bought your Alden tomorrow I'd be leaving the A4 in it. BUT, I like the idea (on a boat) of renewing the needle and seat regularly and overhauling the fuel pump ditto. AND I be having the best darn Racor fuel filter available.
With those precautions a gas fire is almost impossible.
Peace Man.
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Old 05-12-2016, 21:14   #54
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

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Propane is in a dedicated locker dumping overboard.... Not sure how you do that with gasoline fumes


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Isn't that what a Coast Guard required bilge blower is for? Coulda fooled me.
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Old 05-12-2016, 21:17   #55
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

Sure, the propane is in a locker that drains overboard, but there is that pesky hose that leads down into the boat... And nobody has ever had a propane solenoid go bad. Or a flame blow out on a stove, etc... And I've even heard of folks using an absorption fridge on a boat. Heck, I won't even use one in an RV - those things are dangerous.

Those of us with A4s pretty much know that needle and seat are going to get serviced on a pretty common basis - a quickie carb rehab is necessary every 2-4 years. And I've got a racor in front of the fuel pump and another filter after it. Not 'cause I'm worried about the float valve, but because it runs like crap if junk gets into the idle jet.

My dream boat would be a diesel inboard or hybrid with a genset. And an induction stove. (methinks Dockhead has mentioned similar) -- get rid of the propane completely.

If you can make an anchor... and want to make an anchor... make an anchor. I made my first two camping trailers from scratch. I bought my third (actually a motorhome) - time became more valuable. The boat... Well, it's a never-ending project.
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Old 05-12-2016, 22:13   #56
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

I only know of 1 anchor manufacturer that specifies 800mpa steel - Anchorright Australia...that's the correct steel grade to be used for anchors. I will not risk my boat and investment on a homemade unknown steel grade anchor..
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Old 05-12-2016, 22:41   #57
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

Guys, building an anchor isn't that big a deal (difficult). And if you're convinced that it is, do some studying about it online, & via talking to certified welders. Since it's not as if you're building a nuclear submarine, or DSRV out of titanium, that has to pass certain tests so that you know it'll survive at depth.

Man has been joining pieces of metal together with fire for hundreds of years. Literally. For F**k's sake, why the big controversy over this?
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Old 05-12-2016, 22:59   #58
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

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Originally Posted by UNCIVILIZED View Post
Guys, building an anchor isn't that big a deal (difficult). And if you're convinced that it is, do some studying about it online, & via talking to certified welders. Since it's not as if you're building a nuclear submarine, or DSRV out of titanium, that has to pass certain tests so that you know it'll survive at depth.

Man has been joining pieces of metal together with fire for hundreds of years. Literally. For F**k's sake, why the big controversy over this?
A good reason for the controversy is that even the very best anchors are so darn inexpensive. Time better spent on other things.
A bit like re-gal an anchor chain....so much effort and cost to save not a great deal, all things considered.
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Old 05-12-2016, 23:29   #59
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

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You need two things for a gasoline fume explosion: fuel and spark. Yes, you need to be very careful with fuel issues but you must be even more careful with insuring the integrity of the components that need to be explosion proof.

I see many aspects to building or re-building of gear. Just to start, you need to have the ability, you need to have the tools and you need to have the time.

All exist on a sliding scale. We may have the ability to weld but do we have the ability to weld stainless or aluminum? Anyone who works with their hands knows there is always another tool you need in the shop. The straight edge and the file are replaced by the milling machine, etc. as we look for higher levels of accuracy and fit, for example. Many projects require specialty tools and whether you purchase or fabricate, can you justify it? I made up a set of dies for crimping lifeline connectors. Hard to justify if you are only doing one set of lifelines and you canít do it at all without milling equipment and the shop press sitting in the corner ready to do the work.

A big consideration for many of us is the challenge of doing what most others canít do and the personal satisfaction that comes from being able to do quality work that not only creates new but maintains the old and keeps them in good shape for continued service.

Then we come to the aspect of re-engineering. There is not a boat out there with everything done right. We may see design flaws and wish to change them, but bringing plans for new ideas to the welding or machine shop can get very expensive.

I believe the more work you do yourself and the deeper you dive into the workings of everything on your boat, the more you prepare yourself for sailing. Once over the horizon there is no SeaTow. You need the tools, the spare parts and the technical expertise to fix it yourself.
Actually you need 3 things...fuel, heat & oxygen. The fuel/air mix must be right, then ignited by something that is hotter than the ignition temp of the fumes.
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Old 05-12-2016, 23:41   #60
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Re: Homebuilt anchor and other things

Quote:
Originally Posted by UNCIVILIZED View Post
Guys, building an anchor isn't that big a deal (difficult). And if you're convinced that it is, do some studying about it online, & via talking to certified welders. Since it's not as if you're building a nuclear submarine, or DSRV out of titanium, that has to pass certain tests so that you know it'll survive at depth.

Man has been joining pieces of metal together with fire for hundreds of years. Literally. For F**k's sake, why the big controversy over this?
This is quite true and usually the people making the most noise are anchor manufacturers on these forums! Modern welders are just ridiculously easy to use these days and there is a wealth of information out there. Since the arrival of the internet there are just no more secrets. Why would anyone think a Chinese built Rocna is going to be any better built than what the average home craftsman who is not limited by time and worried about using low grade materials. The material costs are very low. My anchor is a copy of an Ultra which in my size sells for $2500 in Australia. Material costs were probably something like 50 bucks. I will admit I spent many hours constructing this anchor, most of the time was spent on the hollow shank. I never spent any time polishing it however. It lives in an anchor well and not on display on a bow roller.
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