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Old 16-01-2017, 05:54   #31
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Re: Boats 40 to 50 ft with comfortable sleeping area.

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Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate View Post
zippy,

I'm in a blunt mood, so batten down your hatches. I think that safety in a seaway is a higher priority than never sleeping in a V-berth. Here's why:

I love blunt and expect nothing less on this forum.


V-berths may be double bed sized--ours is. It offers great passage snoozing when the wind is aft of the beam or there are light airs. Our settees offer heavy weather sleeping.

I agree with you that it is easier to exit a double sided berth in the night for ablutions or checking on stuff, and I share your preference for an aft cockpit boat, and there's the ease of making the bed, too. This boat is a one-off, but an Adams 40 offers a configuration that might work for you.

However, for what it's worth, our boat has two department store doubles: the guest cabin and the forecabin. And that arrangement has worked well for about 55,000 n. mi.

Choose your boat for her seaworthiness; then worry about the accommodations. Sailing the world is not the same as car touring or caravan (motor home) touring. The ocean offer imperators; and you better be able to deal with them, or suffer the humiliation and shame of [ugh!] asking for help. .....And there could be worse consequences.

Ann

My original post stated what the boat is to be used for, which is 6 months of cruising between Puerto Rico and Granada. That means very few (maybe 1) overnight passages. If a rough overnight passage is required at some point, aft cabin or settee berths will work just fine, as you stated. What I am concerned with is the other 99% of the nights when I will be at anchor, and that is what I am buying for.
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Old 16-01-2017, 06:54   #32
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Re: Boats 40 to 50 ft with comfortable sleeping area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zippy View Post
My original post stated what the boat is to be used for, which is 6 months of cruising between Puerto Rico and Granada. That means very few (maybe 1) overnight passages. If a rough overnight passage is required at some point, aft cabin or settee berths will work just fine, as you stated. What I am concerned with is the other 99% of the nights when I will be at anchor, and that is what I am buying for.
And you can certainly rig up lee clothes on a bow centerline queen berth.

I'm one of those (apparently) rare creatures that can sleep in the bow in most conditions. So long as it's not rough enough for me to actually hit the ceiling, I sleep. Plenty of race boats I've just thrown myself on the pile of sails in the bow and passed out lol.

Just always make sure you're sleeping feet-to-bow!

I agree that if you're doing very little passage making that putting appropriate sleeping berths for a seaway too high up your list does not make a lot of sense. It's lower on my list than a galley that is usable (and safe) in a seaway, which I think is mandatory on anything more than a coastal cruiser. I've witnessed too many bad burns from bad inadequate galley layouts.
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Old 16-01-2017, 10:35   #33
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Re: Boats 40 to 50 ft with comfortable sleeping area.

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Originally Posted by Suijin View Post
And you can certainly rig up lee clothes on a bow centerline queen berth.


Just always make sure you're sleeping feet-to-bow!

I agree that if you're doing very little passage making that putting appropriate sleeping berths for a seaway too high up your list does not make a lot of sense..
I've always been a little afraid of sleeping head to bow too for fear of breaking my neck if we hit something that slows or stops us abruptly. But I've never even heard of it actually happening so maybe these centerline cabins with head to bow are OK? I don't know, but your comment caught my eye and reminded me of my own bias historic against them and caused me to think about why. But for this OP who doesn't plan to do much if any sleeping while underway, a centerline forward berth with head to bow wouldn't seem to be much of a problem at all, just as long as his anchor chain locker is sealed off so air near the location of his pillow doesn't smell just like the mud in his most recent anchorage. "It wasn't me!"
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