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Old 28-09-2021, 16:00   #406
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

for those interested in crawling around a 50, but unable to get to the Amel yard in France, my Amel 50 "Fregata" will be the show boat at the boat show">Annapolis boat show in a few weeks and I'll be on board.
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Old 31-12-2021, 15:19   #407
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

I recently read that an Amel 60 "Carmma" was first in class (Div I Cruising) in the 2021 ARC, making the passage from Las Palmas to St Lucia in just under 20 days, and outpacing much lengthier Swans, Oysters and Halberg-Rassy's. Seems that the new Amels are not only beautifully designed and well built but fast also. Interestingly Carmma was only 48 hours slower than the fastest multihull.

Boom, have you crossed the Atlantic yet? I'm sure many of us would love to hear how your Amel 50's performance and comfort compares to your previous catamaran.

https://www.worldcruising.com/conten...ults-class.pdf
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Old 31-12-2021, 17:04   #408
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by seandepagnier View Post
I saw quite a lot of amel boats while cruising all over the world. These are very sturdy boats and many are well traveled.

However it leaves a bad taste to think of each of these wealthy owners of amel who I met who have the means and funds more than anyone to use electric or vegetable oil but instead choose to pollute selfishly as I sail without any engine and manage to visit more places as well. It is backwards and immoral that the few richest people cause the most pollution, and this is yet another manifestation of injustice with pictures of "engines" broadcasting the intention of future crimes while people speak of their "IPO" stocks which is just a legal form of theft.
You are an anachronism. 99.9% of people want bigger and better, yet you want smaller, slower, more uncomfortable and inferior. You are wrong on every count to boot. You are also selfish to think your way is the right way. It is not. It is the dumb way. You can use energy without killing the planet, it just has to be done intelligently.

I suggest you are motivated by a bitter, sad, pathetic and supercilious envy.
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Old 31-12-2021, 17:15   #409
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by poiu View Post
You are an anachronism. 99.9% of people want bigger and better, yet you want smaller, slower, more uncomfortable and inferior. You are wrong on every count to boot. You are also selfish to think your way is the right way. It is not. It is the dumb way. You can use energy without killing the planet, it just has to be done intelligently.

I suggest you are motivated by a bitter, sad, pathetic and supercilious envy.


While most of what you say is correct I don’t think 99.9 wants” bigger “. There comes a point where bigger is big attractive
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Old 01-01-2022, 16:55   #410
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

Atlantic crossing is 2-3 years away from me as I plan to slowly circumnavigate. I'm a cruiser though. I value comfort over speed. I've done few "longer" 2 day crossings with the Amel and she's very comfortable. I appreciate the softer motion of a heavy monohull over the jerky motion of a cat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by O-N-O View Post
Boom, have you crossed the Atlantic yet? I'm sure many of us would love to hear how your Amel 50's performance and comfort compares to your previous catamaran.

https://www.worldcruising.com/conten...ults-class.pdf
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Old 31-01-2022, 08:56   #411
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

So i thought I'd share some thoughts on the Amel 50 now that I've had her for a year, sailed her around Rhode Island and Massachusetts, sailed her from Newport to Annapolis for the boat show, and then from Ensenada MX to Sausalito CA.
  • First and foremost, I'm blown away by how well this boat moves (with light wind sails) in light wind.. I've been in 7 knots of wind doing 4 knots with her code zero...for a heavy cruising boat she really performs which candidly wasn't something i expected.
  • Second is how responsive Amel is to providing parts and support - the few things I've broken haven had new parts air dropped to me within 48 hours of reaching out to them. This is just fantastic support.
  • Third is how easy it is to single hand these boats and how safe it feels - even in rough weather to manage a fairly large yacht such as this by oneself should your partner be asleep and you're on watch. Perhaps the only thing that really does beg for 2 hands is putting out the spinnaker pole and truthfully only when you're in rougher rolling seas as it's a beast - but in calmer conditions this too is something i've done by myself.
  • Fourth is that Amel continues to take owner feedback and tweak the end product to great effect. The boats just get better and better, so that those of you considering getting one really are benefitting from the first 60 that have been built and which in at least one case has literally been circumnavigated.
  • Fifth - the cockpit enclosure is worth every penny. I've been in 40f at night with sideways blowing torrential rain in 35 knots of wind... and zipped up in the cockpit, with the companionway open and the heat running in sweat pants and a T-shirt toasty warm, dry, and comfortable.


for those considering ordering one some of the options that I feel created huge value in terms of user experience:
  • The Lithium battery package
  • Solar on the roof and on the davits (you'll end up with around 1300 watts)
  • The removeable electric light wind Furler
  • Ceiling mounted hand holds in the saloon
  • Induction stove
  • Fans throughout (they don't list this you have to ask)
  • Windshield wipers - they didn't offer this on my generation but do now and it will make a big difference in visibility during heavy rain during the day
  • Book case in the aft cabin / owners suite
  • The more expensive inflatable fenders - this saves you ACRES of space in the lazarette which would otherwise be essentially full with fenders
  • Both the code zero and the gennaker
  • The collapsible saloon table to make the larger bed/couch area
  • Lee cloths for the saloon couches

I wish you all happy sailing!

Cheers,
-Justin
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Old 31-01-2022, 09:03   #412
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by boom23 View Post
Atlantic crossing is 2-3 years away from me as I plan to slowly circumnavigate. I'm a cruiser though. I value comfort over speed. I've done few "longer" 2 day crossings with the Amel and she's very comfortable. I appreciate the softer motion of a heavy monohull over the jerky motion of a cat.
Were you still in Greece last summer during the heatwave? How is the airflow in the master cabin? Or were you (forced?..) to switch on the AC every evening?
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Old 31-01-2022, 10:24   #413
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

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Originally Posted by De.windhoos View Post
Were you still in Greece last summer during the heatwave? How is the airflow in the master cabin? Or were you (forced?..) to switch on the AC every evening?
I was not in Greece last season. I am going this summer though.

I was in Greece during 2020. I anchored about half of the time and never used the AC. The master cabin air flow is great with the opening hatches. I never had a problem. I also Med moored with no heat issues either. The only annoying thing was the almost continuously running generators of neighboring boats.

It is much hotter in the S. Pacific, but I prefer the quiet over the ability to run the AC.
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Old 31-01-2022, 10:30   #414
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mag3 View Post
So i thought I'd share some thoughts on the Amel 50 now that I've had her for a year, sailed her around Rhode Island and Massachusetts, sailed her from Newport to Annapolis for the boat show, and then from Ensenada MX to Sausalito CA.
  • First and foremost, I'm blown away by how well this boat moves (with light wind sails) in light wind.. I've been in 7 knots of wind doing 4 knots with her code zero...for a heavy cruising boat she really performs which candidly wasn't something i expected.
  • Second is how responsive Amel is to providing parts and support - the few things I've broken haven had new parts air dropped to me within 48 hours of reaching out to them. This is just fantastic support.
  • Third is how easy it is to single hand these boats and how safe it feels - even in rough weather to manage a fairly large yacht such as this by oneself should your partner be asleep and you're on watch. Perhaps the only thing that really does beg for 2 hands is putting out the spinnaker pole and truthfully only when you're in rougher rolling seas as it's a beast - but in calmer conditions this too is something i've done by myself.
  • Fourth is that Amel continues to take owner feedback and tweak the end product to great effect. The boats just get better and better, so that those of you considering getting one really are benefitting from the first 60 that have been built and which in at least one case has literally been circumnavigated.
  • Fifth - the cockpit enclosure is worth every penny. I've been in 40f at night with sideways blowing torrential rain in 35 knots of wind... and zipped up in the cockpit, with the companionway open and the heat running in sweat pants and a T-shirt toasty warm, dry, and comfortable.

I wish you all happy sailing!

Cheers,
-Justin
I second your feelings about the Amel 50. She's a very refined boat backed by an amazing company. I had no problem single handing her for a season in the Med. My only concern was the charter boats with inexperienced captains, which provided great entertainment many evenings.
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Old 31-01-2022, 10:48   #415
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by boom23 View Post
I second your feelings about the Amel 50. She's a very refined boat backed by an amazing company. I had no problem single handing her for a season in the Med. My only concern was the charter boats with inexperienced captains, which provided great entertainment many evenings.

Would you or Justin have any tips on single handed Mediterranean mooring the Amel 50? Asking for a friend
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Old 31-01-2022, 11:52   #416
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

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Would you or Justin have any tips on single handed Mediterranean mooring the Amel 50? Asking for a friend
The following is what I did. I have to admit that it was very stressful the first few times...

It is best to Med moor between two boats, or next to one (hopefully to leeward of your desired spot). Ideally, there are people onboard the neighboring boats, as you will ask them to help you with your stern lines. Sometimes, there are people on shore who offer help, but you will probably need to guide them.

Prepare the stern lines (attached to cleats and coiled ready to be tossed), and have all your fenders out on both sides of your boat. You can use a stern fender, but I never found the need for one. I do not want to rely on a stern fender as it may move and offer no protection. Also, I do not like to be that close to the quay.

After you locate a suitable quay location, motor toward the anchoring spot. You want to anchor as far as possible, while you have enough anchor rode to back up to the quay. The anchor chain does no good in the anchor locker. Having a lot of scope is very important in case someone lifts your anchor, which happens very often. If that happens and you have enough scope, you can just pull some anchor chain and still be OK. Otherwise, you will have to med moor again... When you reach the desired anchoring location, go to the bow and try to locate other anchor lines or anchors. Look at neighboring med moored boats as their captains may point to their anchor location. You want to avoid anchoring over someone as he will lift your anchor when he leaves, which is not fun when it happens to you, but fun to watch when it happens to others... Cheap entertainment...

Once you are happy with the anchoring spot, go back to the helm and start dropping anchor. When it reaches the bottom, continue letting out anchor line and start backing up with enough speed to maintain control. Remember that the anchor chain is pulling on the bow, so you'll need much more throttle than usual. Center the rudder and forget it. Set the throttle and forget it, when you are moving at the desired speed. Have one hand on the anchor control and the other on the bow thruster (or momentarily on the throttle to adjust speed) while you face the stern. The stronger the wind or current, the higher the back up speed, which can be unnerving. You want the stern moving in the direction of the quay, and angled toward the wind/current. You can straighten up when you are close to other boats.

Let out enough chain so that the anchor stops your boat when your stern is around midship of the surrounding boats. This way, you know that your anchor is holding. Also, the surrounding boats will stop your boat from moving side to side. When this happens, I usually leave the boat in idle reverse and walk around to adjust the fenders as needed. The boat should be stopped by the anchor and the surrounding boats. This is also the time to ask for help with the stern lines.

If everything is looks OK and you have someone on shore, continue letting out chain while you back up so that the boat stops again about 6 feet (2 meters) from the quay. Leave the throttle in idle reverse and go to the stern to toss the stern lines (windward first) to the shore person. He is supposed to loop the stern lines on a shore ring, and throw them back to you. You can tell the shore person to pick rings that are spaced sufficiently wide. To tighten the stern lines, you can either use more reverse throttle, or pull more anchor chain up. You want the anchor chain tight. Be mindful that during all this the engine is almost always in reverse. You do not want any lines close to the prop.

I hope this helps. Enjoy your Amel 50!!!
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Old 31-01-2022, 17:37   #417
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

Oh my, all of the recent comments have been wonderful to read. And to think, my retirement is around 2041...it feels like a million years from now.

Thank you for all the details on the likes/loves of the boat and the technique you're using for a Med moor. With only one season of boat ownership under my belt, just reading it gets my heart rate up.

Boom or Mag, if you have any photos to share here or on a public page, I bet there's more than a few of us who will be happy to drool over them.
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Old 31-01-2022, 22:09   #418
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by boom23 View Post
The following is what I did. I have to admit that it was very stressful the first few times...

It is best to Med moor between two boats, or next to one (hopefully to leeward of your desired spot). Ideally, there are people onboard the neighboring boats, as you will ask them to help you with your stern lines. Sometimes, there are people on shore who offer help, but you will probably need to guide them.

Prepare the stern lines (attached to cleats and coiled ready to be tossed), and have all your fenders out on both sides of your boat. You can use a stern fender, but I never found the need for one. I do not want to rely on a stern fender as it may move and offer no protection. Also, I do not like to be that close to the quay.

After you locate a suitable quay location, motor toward the anchoring spot. You want to anchor as far as possible, while you have enough anchor rode to back up to the quay. The anchor chain does no good in the anchor locker. Having a lot of scope is very important in case someone lifts your anchor, which happens very often. If that happens and you have enough scope, you can just pull some anchor chain and still be OK. Otherwise, you will have to med moor again... When you reach the desired anchoring location, go to the bow and try to locate other anchor lines or anchors. Look at neighboring med moored boats as their captains may point to their anchor location. You want to avoid anchoring over someone as he will lift your anchor when he leaves, which is not fun when it happens to you, but fun to watch when it happens to others... Cheap entertainment...

Once you are happy with the anchoring spot, go back to the helm and start dropping anchor. When it reaches the bottom, continue letting out anchor line and start backing up with enough speed to maintain control. Remember that the anchor chain is pulling on the bow, so you'll need much more throttle than usual. Center the rudder and forget it. Set the throttle and forget it, when you are moving at the desired speed. Have one hand on the anchor control and the other on the bow thruster (or momentarily on the throttle to adjust speed) while you face the stern. The stronger the wind or current, the higher the back up speed, which can be unnerving. You want the stern moving in the direction of the quay, and angled toward the wind/current. You can straighten up when you are close to other boats.

Let out enough chain so that the anchor stops your boat when your stern is around midship of the surrounding boats. This way, you know that your anchor is holding. Also, the surrounding boats will stop your boat from moving side to side. When this happens, I usually leave the boat in idle reverse and walk around to adjust the fenders as needed. The boat should be stopped by the anchor and the surrounding boats. This is also the time to ask for help with the stern lines.

If everything is looks OK and you have someone on shore, continue letting out chain while you back up so that the boat stops again about 6 feet (2 meters) from the quay. Leave the throttle in idle reverse and go to the stern to toss the stern lines (windward first) to the shore person. He is supposed to loop the stern lines on a shore ring, and throw them back to you. You can tell the shore person to pick rings that are spaced sufficiently wide. To tighten the stern lines, you can either use more reverse throttle, or pull more anchor chain up. You want the anchor chain tight. Be mindful that during all this the engine is almost always in reverse. You do not want any lines close to the prop.

I hope this helps. Enjoy your Amel 50!!!

Thank you! Plenty of good tips there.
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Old 31-01-2022, 23:13   #419
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

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Originally Posted by justflie View Post
Boom or Mag, if you have any photos to share here or on a public page, I bet there's more than a few of us who will be happy to drool over them.
If you'd like to see some pictures of an Amel 50 being built, have a look at some of the posts on my Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/alistair.cunningham.1/

Entropy is Amel 50 hull number 63. She'll be completed on 14th February, and the handover is on 28th March. Lots more pictures to follow...
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Old 01-02-2022, 09:50   #420
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Re: Amel 50 - Build Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by justflie View Post
Oh my, all of the recent comments have been wonderful to read. And to think, my retirement is around 2041...it feels like a million years from now.

Thank you for all the details on the likes/loves of the boat and the technique you're using for a Med moor. With only one season of boat ownership under my belt, just reading it gets my heart rate up.

Boom or Mag, if you have any photos to share here or on a public page, I bet there's more than a few of us who will be happy to drool over them.
Med mooring in a harbour is not difficult, I feel that it's easier than mooring between pillars. Ofcourse during the off-season when there's nobody around the Amel configuration probably feels like a bit of a handicap. On my Catalina I can "easily" jump on the dock to run a line through a ring and jump back.
However single handed med mooring in a narrow bay where you need to deploy 50 metres of mooring line (swim or take dinghy to get line tied ashore) is a different kettle of fish!
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