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Old 16-09-2019, 13:07   #16
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Re: What is this called?

...this definitely looks like a " homemade" contraption to me.
...right of the bat, the furler could benefit from an additional toggle under the drum and under the tang that attaches to the triangular plate....and the triangular plate could also benefit from a toggle between the plate and the hull...this will give some flexibility when this setup is torsioned under sail...
...if for any reason, either of those forestays fail, there will be immediate movement, slack and twist in the remaining stay...and could bring the mast down...

..another issue...
...not sure if this rig depends on both forestays for rig stability, or if the mast will remain standing with only one forestay.....

..I can understand the convenience aspect of this rig...but needs to be thought out a bit better...
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Old 16-09-2019, 14:43   #17
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Re: What is this called?

As a point of interest the first time I saw this headstay arrangement was on retired newsanchor Walter Cronkite's yacht Wintje at Martha's Vinyard in the '80s. He said it worked fine. I think his boat was built by Hinckley.
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Old 16-09-2019, 15:02   #18
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Re: What is this called?

Quote:
Originally Posted by thunderhoof View Post
As a point of interest the first time I saw this headstay arrangement was on retired newsanchor Walter Cronkite's yacht Wintje at Martha's Vinyard in the '80s. He said it worked fine. I think his boat was built by Hinckley.
I'm finding very few people who say they have seen it before. This is on a '79 model and research suggests it had fallen out of favor by then.
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Old 16-09-2019, 15:12   #19
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Re: What is this called?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LongRange View Post
With that much spacing between the stays, there's bound to be a bit of torsional load when only one sail is deployed. Seems a tad risky, though a good idea otherwise.
Yeah, look at the twist on the shackle at the bottom of the trinangular plate...that would keep me awake when off watch.
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Old 16-09-2019, 15:15   #20
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Re: What is this called?

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Originally Posted by S/V Adeline View Post
...
I've only had the opportunity to show the picture to one 'rigger' and his response was 'that's different', so I guess I just haven't found the right rigger yet.
That was my first thought too. Ive never seen that either...with good reason I think. Its not now twin headstays are normally rigged. Looks more like a PO jury rig to me.
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Old 16-09-2019, 15:17   #21
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Re: What is this called?

Quote:
Originally Posted by thunderhoof View Post
As a point of interest the first time I saw this headstay arrangement was on retired newsanchor Walter Cronkite's yacht Wintje at Martha's Vinyard in the '80s. He said it worked fine. I think his boat was built by Hinckley.
The exact same set up, wonky triangular plate and all?
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Old 16-09-2019, 16:00   #22
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Re: What is this called?

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Originally Posted by S/V Adeline View Post
RaymondR,
Thanks, helps knowing what the parts are called. The top connection is more like a neck yoke.
Chouliha,
Do you know if she had issues with it?
LongRange,
I understand torsional twisting is why twin headstay setups fell out of favor, but every picture I can find and every description is of two separate mounting points on the bow connections.

I've only had the opportunity to show the picture to one 'rigger' and his response was 'that's different', so I guess I just haven't found the right rigger yet.
My sisters lapworth 36 Gambit lower fitting was a SS triangle with 3 holes in it. The downward facing corner had one hole and that was attached to the lower toggle. The upper two holes were attached to each headstay.

They had no issues with it. They removed it when doing a long upwind trips. They did a 200 mile day with it going to the Marquesas. Not back for a old woody

They did NOT have a roller furler attached to it. Both stays were used with hanks

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Old 16-09-2019, 16:13   #23
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Re: What is this called?

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Originally Posted by chouliha View Post
My sisters lapworth 36 Gambit lower fitting was a SS triangle with 3 holes in it. The downward facing corner had one hole and that was attached to the lower toggle. The upper two holes were attached to each headstay.

They had no issues with it. They removed it when doing a long upwind trips. They did a 200 mile day with it going to the Marquesas. Not back for a old woody

They did NOT have a roller furler attached to it. Both stays were used with hanks

Chuck
Heading upwind, the windward stay creates turbulence just around the point the leading edge of the sail cuts into the wind. On dual roller furling the massive rolled sail really decreased performance. (or so it was written about)
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Old 16-09-2019, 18:16   #24
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Re: What is this called?

...did Cronkite's boat have " toggles" at this plate is the $50,000 question ???
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Old 16-09-2019, 19:42   #25
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Re: What is this called?

Still, though, if the plate and stays are allowed to pivot, would that set-up solve the problem of differential tension on the headstays that the original twin headstay arrangements suffered from? I'm thinking it would, though you are still stuck with high loads on the stays. I am not necessarily advocating it, but it looks like it does solve that problem.
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Old 23-09-2019, 07:02   #26
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Re: What is this called?

This furler is a Famet furler. Works great...doesnít bind. Pull on jib sheet to unfurl and pull on furling line to wrap the jib back up. The company was in the Kansas City area. Then sold to a guy who went cruising to Central America for a couple of years. I bought the last two bearings (flat plastic like discs really) before he left on his cruise. I had this furler on a Watkins 27 sloop and took it from Annapolis south on the ICW. Never had any problems with it! You should be able to find a manual on line for it!
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Old 23-09-2019, 07:36   #27
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Re: What is this called?

It screams, "Dismasting in a Blow".
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Old 23-09-2019, 09:20   #28
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Re: What is this called?

The metal plate is called a monkeys face
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Old 23-09-2019, 11:40   #29
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Re: What is this called?

I have had a Reef Rite furler for years. It is made in New Zealand and I am extremely happy with it. It has a foil with two slots which can take two sails at a time but I have never used it that way. The slots are designed to take Kiwi Slides instead of the usual bolt rope. Kiwi Slides are much like sew on hanks except they are sewn to the sail by tabs. They are sewn on at intervals similar to hanks and look like short sections of bolt rope which slide up the track in the foil. There is a rotating gate in the foil about four feet above the drum which gives access to loading a sail with Kiwi Slides below it. The gate is then closed to provide a clear track for the luff to be hoisted much like a hank on sail. It works very well. Sails can be easily raised or lowered like hank on sails. The gate can be rotated to select the second track while the first sail is being used. The second track can be loaded with another sail ready to be hoisted when the first one is dropped. Two sails could be raised at the same time but I have not tried it. In addition the furler has a ratchet mechanism that keeps the sail from coming back out when it is being furled. This is great for reefing because the furling line is not holding the sail. The sail size is fixed and not dependent on the stretch of the furling line. I hope the explanation is clear. Their website has a good explanation.
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Old 23-09-2019, 16:48   #30
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Re: What is this called?

Quote:
Originally Posted by S/V Adeline View Post
I have searched the internet and came up bust. I have found many "dual headstays" but all are described as dual stays running from mast to bow with separate anchor points on the bow. Most everything I have found described either twin hank on stays or twin rollers, both with only 2" or so spacing between them.
This is obviously two stays, but only single mounting position on deck (bowsprit in my case) and mast.
Does anyone know if there is a specific term or name for this setup or would it be considered under the generic term of twin stays?
I understand the twin stays fell out of favor during my youth, but I thought they had fallen out before '79.Attachment 199919
looks like a code 0 furler
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