Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 28-10-2019, 11:21   #46
Moderator
 
a64pilot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Jacksonville/ out cruising
Boat: Island Packet 38
Posts: 31,044
Re: Securing Halyards

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelNW View Post
A split pool noodle is great for keeping the halyards from slapping.


Iíve wondered about the insulation that is put on airconditioner lines myself, pool noodles degrade quickly in the sun.
__________________

a64pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-10-2019, 12:00   #47
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Cruising, now in USVIs
Boat: Taswell 43
Posts: 678
Re: Securing Halyards

following. The pool noodle sounds like a good plan, and can do double duty when you're swimming off the boat!
__________________

sailcrazy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-10-2019, 13:30   #48
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 18,797
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
Re: Securing Halyards

i befoul my lines around shrouds and spreaders and affix away from mast whenever possible.
i dislike spending money needlessly on halyards and painting my woodenmast when lines rupture from slap slap slap..it isnot merely hardware failure slapping halyards create. i learned at a very early age how to properly stow/leave
my boat.
and i love the noises the returning alleged sailors make when they find their slapping halyards have finally --has only been pone season--failed..hahahahaha
aint my misfortune. i have enough of my own that i need not concern meself with the fails of others. learning happens.
but the sound of slapping halyards is not the sound of good seamanship
__________________
life is an adventure meant to be LIVED!!!!
https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums...oul+mates.html


https://sksolitarybird.org/
zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-10-2019, 13:38   #49
Moderator
 
JPA Cate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: aboard, cruising in Australia
Boat: Sayer 46' Solent rig sloop
Posts: 18,958
Re: Securing Halyards

Someone above wrote this:
Quote:
The mods should be dealing with that, not you.
Actually, the rules say, "be nice", and also say that we are to be respectful with our posts. In other words, the moderators will hold the members responsible for staying within the community rules.....Or, put another way, to be self moderating. There are two buttons on each page that one can use to check the rules, one at the top that says "Community," and one at the bottom, which says "Community Rules".

Ann
__________________
Who scorns the calm has forgotten the storm.
JPA Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-10-2019, 15:07   #50
Registered User
 
Wanton's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Boat: Careel 22 (long cabin)
Posts: 13
Images: 1
Send a message via Skype™ to Wanton
Re: Securing Halyards

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartings View Post
So what’s the best way to stop a halyard from slapping against the mast (other than removing it) ?
The best way to stop a halyard banging and hitting the mast or other fitting is simple. Cleat the offending halyard tight, take a piece of rope or a bungee cord and tie the line from the halyard to a side stay or forestay tight. That will stop the halyard banging on the mast.

If the offending halyard is on another boat and the owner is away, don't stand there taking a video, get a piece of rope and do as above.

If the offending noise is coming from a flopping jib or sail on another boat and the owner is away, don't stand there taking video of it, go on board and secure the sail. The owner will thank you for helping out perhaps saving his sail from flogging and tearing itself to bits. I once arrived to where my boat was moored and saw a group of yachties tut tutting about a furled jib that was flogging itself to pieces on an unattended boat. I immediately went onto the boat and pulled the sail down and tied it up. What is wrong with people to just stand there and watch damage being done to a unattended boat?

Remember many people have hearing problems, so just because you can hear the noise they probably can't. All you need to do is simply and nicely point out the issue and perhaps even share your vast knowledge about how to remedy the situation. We are yachties, supposedly helpful to one another.
Wanton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-10-2019, 18:56   #51
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Florida and New Jersey
Boat: O'Day, 26, 25' 8"
Posts: 22
Re: Securing Halyards

A bungee cord between any offending lines and a stay works for me.
emenskl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2019, 07:11   #52
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Dana Point, Ca.
Boat: olsen / ericson 34
Posts: 422
Re: Securing Halyards

Good points.....

Securing the main halyard is automatic and keeps the halyard from constantly slapping against the mast.

We use line or a sail tie to tie the halyard off to a shroud and keep it away from the mast...works for extra halyards as well.

* Or the main halyard itself lead aft and snap shackle or secure it back to the topping lift fitting . Take a purchase on the halyard and cleat in down.

* Or secured to a line vertically up a ways to the halyard and lead back to the topping lift fastening, Tightly secure.

* Or the line or halyard lead back to one of the strong straps that hold the stack pack for the main. Lead it back several feet and the halyard is totally away from the mast and tight .

No slapping or banging, and the halyard is totally secured . Peace and quiet.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Preparing for hoisting the main .

Since we are going to be sailing, when rigging the vessel for sea, release and remove any of those those types of preventers, and run a temporary ' down haul '. That takes the slack out of the loose halyard and having it wrap around a spreader.

Easy and quick. We take the halyard it itself, lead from the head of the sail, down and tightly secured with a half wrap to a lower mast mast cleat . Then take a purchase on the the main halyard , nice and tight.

When ready to haul up the main, ease off the halyard, release the down haul at the cleat and haul up the main. One of us is jumping the halyard at the mast the other is hauling the main up with the winch back in the cockpit.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On, one more idea to keep our lives easy.

If the winds are strong, before leaving the dock, or mooring or anchor, we tuck in a single or double reef before departing with the main sail down. It does take some effort to make sure that the tack and the leach reefing points are tightly secured and the new foot of the reefed main pulled aft and very tight.

Easier to haul up the , less time involved and no bounding about on the fore deck to reef the main when outside at sea.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Down in the BVI, or anyplace, 90 % of the anchored or moored vessels do not tie off their halyards and slap and bang away day and night.

Both catamarans and monohulls.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We also see when on a mooring or in a slip , that many of the sailing vessels do not bring the main luff down all the way, and some have 25 to 35 % of the main still up while in a slip or moored.

We all understand that it is some times very difficult to reach up and get the luff of the main all the way down .

That is easily remedied by walking up to the mast with a boat hook, and pull the luff sail slides down. and then secure the main halyard properly.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jib Roller snarling lines, should also be secured properly and the tails coiled and secured as well....and of course the roller furling jib rolled in all the way, with three wraps around the rolled in sail. Or in a strong wind, that jib can blow out and be destroyed....or worse .
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Seamanship, and thinking of others is a good quality in the posters here.

But, those seamanship ideas are not practiced by the majority of sailors. Just take a walk around a marina when any wind is up and listen to the pinging and clanking halyards. Or, when in a mooring field.

Ear plugs come in handy , when sleeping aboard.

Or PLAN ' X ' ....Harrgghh, Hoist the jolly roger, , away all boarding parties, board the offenders, vessel, cut and free their halyard, bind the perpetrators round and round with their errant halyard, toss em down below onto the cabin sole,and pilfer their rum locker to continue the party back on board your vessel.

Aye, a bit harsh, but that might be the only way for them to get a clue .
Lihuedooley77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2019, 04:24   #53
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 1
Re: Securing Halyards

My headsail halyard runs internal to the mast, my main halyard I have long enough to leave attached to the sail, pull it along the stack pack and fasten the rope to a clip on the end of the boom.
Helliope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2019, 04:29   #54
Senior Cruiser
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 38,198
Images: 241
Re: Securing Halyards

Greetings and belated welcome aboard the CF, Helliope.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 16:43   #55
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Minneapolis
Boat: Tartan 40
Posts: 14
Re: Securing Halyards

I've had trouble with slapping wiring and internal halyards on my Irwin 34' sloop forever, especially at anchor with the slightest roll. I'm ready to try drilling 4 to 6 1/8" or 3/16" holes through mast, half way up, and crisscrossing long zip ties horizontally through the holes.
__________________

djhsailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
halyard

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Securing laptop underway BobB Marine Electronics 42 22-12-2016 19:31
Securing Laptop at Nav Station seattle sailor Marine Electronics 6 24-12-2009 12:31
Securing to the Dock davevancat Anchoring & Mooring 16 07-11-2009 09:41
Securing a Cruise-n-Carry AC Underway thinwater Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 11 05-08-2009 20:59
Securing Objects to the Boat landonshaw Construction, Maintenance & Refit 6 28-05-2009 17:54

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:00.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.