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Old 03-02-2022, 08:28   #1
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Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits



There are a couple videos showing this. Supposedly after a lightning strike the captain decided to make for a marina with no engines. It didn't work out so well.

Gladly everyone survived.
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Old 03-02-2022, 10:57   #2
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

Parlay II
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Old 03-02-2022, 11:02   #3
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

That is old news, this happened at Alimos marina close to Athens in Greece.
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Old 03-02-2022, 11:21   #4
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

The accident happened was back in October 21. Whilst the boat was at the entrance of the marina, it was struck by lightning, resulting in a general blackout of all the electronics and engines. She was a charter boat called Salty Pearl and all nine onboard were ok.

But it is amazing how much 'news' is old news. And no disrespect to the OP, it's easy to be fooled.
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Old 03-02-2022, 11:51   #5
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

Quote:
Originally Posted by grantmc View Post
The accident happened was back in October 21. Whilst the boat was at the entrance of the marina, it was struck by lightning, resulting in a general blackout of all the electronics and engines. She was a charter boat called Salty Pearl and all nine onboard were ok.

But it is amazing how much 'news' is old news. And no disrespect to the OP, it's easy to be fooled.
I reckon I should have mentioned this was dated news. I have not seen this video before nor read any discussion about it.

Thought by now there would be "more to the story", maybe even something to learn.
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Old 03-02-2022, 13:53   #6
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saleen411 View Post
I reckon I should have mentioned this was dated news. I have not seen this video before nor read any discussion about it.

Thought by now there would be "more to the story", maybe even something to learn.
I have not seen the video either and I am glad you posted it.

Lightning hitting a boat is one of my concerns, especially with the new diesels that are full of electronics and need power to run.

I have had lightning hit all near me on a couple of occasions, only once in a boat(kayak) but that was enough. Lightning hit my dad's sailboat decades ago but the only the radio, lights, and depth sounder were taken out. Course, that is all there was TO take out. The engine was just fine.

Horrible to watch that boat get grounded to pieces.

Thanks,
Dan
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Old 03-02-2022, 17:05   #7
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

Boat vs rock is never going to end well.

Like any disaster a chain of events leads to the catastrophe at the end with loss of vessel, and possible loss of life.

IN this case,

Event Chain link 1. inadequate lightning protection. I know this begs the question, but whatever steps including anchoring in a thunderstorm was obviously insufficient.

Event Chain link 2. No backup electronics, Both engines were offline. Not atypical with electronic engines where a single transistor can make them inoperative.

SO at this point the boat is in no immediate danger. Repeated lightening strikes are unlikely to do further damage than, well, TAKE OUT BOTH ENGINES.

Up to now the boat owner is reacting, instead of proacting.

NOW is the time to make a decision, hopefully one that doesn't make the problem even worse.

Choices...

Choice 1. Stay put. The boat isn't sinking at this point. Close all seacocks, and examine Bilge area, and all seacocks, and hoses for damage, prepare stoppers, and waterproof tape, and or adhesive for any leaks.
Try to get any bilge pump, or dewatering device working, and test for successful operation. Which then leads to ....

Choice 2. Leave the boat, apparently an option as the boat is anchored within dinghy distance from shore.

Downside, you are leaving a damaged boat unattended. You may have to get shore lodging, and risk a dinghy run in the same severe weather that damaged the first boat.

Upsides. If you wait for a good weather window to dinghy ashore, you can wait for optimum conditions. From shore you can contact towing, and engine mechanic, Assuming radio is down on boat, you now have access to help, and parts to repair boat.

Hanging out in a hotel while not cheap is generally safe.

From now on additional choices are higher risk.

Choice 3. Move the boat to a shallow anchorage to minimize risk of sinking.

You are now taking a damaged craft from the secure anchorage you've had it in until now, and intentionally placing it in harms way. There is no way to sugar coat Navigating with a broke boat, NO Chartplotter, depth finder, and NO ENGINES.

Choice 4. (The choice attempted) Drive a BROKE boat into a narrow channel lined with rocks under ail alone, with NO ENGINES, and adverse currents, and wind.

With predictable results.
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Old 03-02-2022, 17:09   #8
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

The point of my diatribe above is every disaster is a chain of events.

The most important thing any boat owner, (or Nuclear plant operator), can do is as soon as something goes wrong, or unexpected the FIRST step is to properly assess the situation, and take the proper action to BREAK the chain.

Take a well thought out, but decisive step to prevent the chain from progressing further.
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Old 03-02-2022, 17:26   #9
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

why engine stop working, this is a question.
i personally always order new sailboat with traditional mechanical control EVC
immediately after receive boat remove the electronic valve on high-pressure pump and make bypass wire to possible start engine on the engine compartment. But for couple year i think after 2030 all small engine must be with electronic like cars.

i don like my engine communicates with anybody,i don't want my engine to communicate with me. my engine when i start engine must work or DIe ,i always have money to buy another new engine, nobody need save me my money.
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Old 03-02-2022, 18:44   #10
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

I know less than nothing about modern diesel engines, however, I didn't think a lightning strike could make an engine(s) quit.

Which is why I've been told as technique, start the engine(s) to prior entering areas of lightning. No?
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Old 03-02-2022, 19:30   #11
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saleen411 View Post
I know less than nothing about modern diesel engines, however, I didn't think a lightning strike could make an engine(s) quit.

Which is why I've been told as technique, start the engine(s) to prior entering areas of lightning. No?
Had a long talk with some JD representatives in 2014. Modern diesels require three things to run,
  1. Diesel
  2. Air
  3. Power

Take away one of these three things and the engine will not run. Old diesels just needed air and fuel.

Modern engines have lots of electronics. All it takes takes is a power surge to fry just one component and that engine is not running.

My assumption is that if the battery got fried by a lightning strike, the diesel would not continue to run.

Later,
Dan
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Old 04-02-2022, 00:45   #12
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saleen411 View Post
I know less than nothing about modern diesel engines, however, I didn't think a lightning strike could make an engine(s) quit.

Which is why I've been told as technique, start the engine(s) to prior entering areas of lightning. No?
some people order NMEA 2000 (usually don't work but new after 2019 you have 50/50% work) with Fuel Shut-off Valve
like this Stop solenoid 3584127 or
https://www.yachtboatparts.com/volvo...-75-8390-p.asp
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Old 04-02-2022, 03:25   #13
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

Quote:
Originally Posted by capn_billl View Post
Boat vs rock is never going to end well.

Like any disaster a chain of events leads to the catastrophe at the end with loss of vessel, and possible loss of life.

IN this case,

Event Chain link 1. inadequate lightning protection. I know this begs the question, but whatever steps including anchoring in a thunderstorm was obviously insufficient.

Event Chain link 2. No backup electronics, Both engines were offline. Not atypical with electronic engines where a single transistor can make them inoperative.

SO at this point the boat is in no immediate danger. Repeated lightening strikes are unlikely to do further damage than, well, TAKE OUT BOTH ENGINES.

Up to now the boat owner is reacting, instead of proacting.

NOW is the time to make a decision, hopefully one that doesn't make the problem even worse.

Choices...

Choice 1. Stay put. The boat isn't sinking at this point. Close all seacocks, and examine Bilge area, and all seacocks, and hoses for damage, prepare stoppers, and waterproof tape, and or adhesive for any leaks.
Try to get any bilge pump, or dewatering device working, and test for successful operation. Which then leads to ....

Choice 2. Leave the boat, apparently an option as the boat is anchored within dinghy distance from shore.

Downside, you are leaving a damaged boat unattended. You may have to get shore lodging, and risk a dinghy run in the same severe weather that damaged the first boat.

Upsides. If you wait for a good weather window to dinghy ashore, you can wait for optimum conditions. From shore you can contact towing, and engine mechanic, Assuming radio is down on boat, you now have access to help, and parts to repair boat.

Hanging out in a hotel while not cheap is generally safe.

From now on additional choices are higher risk.

Choice 3. Move the boat to a shallow anchorage to minimize risk of sinking.

You are now taking a damaged craft from the secure anchorage you've had it in until now, and intentionally placing it in harms way. There is no way to sugar coat Navigating with a broke boat, NO Chartplotter, depth finder, and NO ENGINES.

Choice 4. (The choice attempted) Drive a BROKE boat into a narrow channel lined with rocks under ail alone, with NO ENGINES, and adverse currents, and wind.

With predictable results.

Apparently chain of events were:


GrantMC Post 4 " Whilst the boat was at the entrance of the marina, it was struck by lightning, resulting in a general blackout of all the electronics and engines."


So chain of events were:


Lightning strike, Oh Sh$t, Big wind & swell, marina breakwall, No engines or electrics, Ouch got blown onto rocks, better get off boat quick like. End of story..... Unlucky, but (Sh)it happens.


Choices: Hit Rocks, Get off boat safely..... Score for Captain and Crew 10/10
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Old 04-02-2022, 04:31   #14
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

I never thought of good sailing performance, windward ability and dagger boards as safety items, but here we are.

The above posts are reading like a trawler forum.
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Old 04-02-2022, 06:01   #15
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Re: Lagoon Catamaran Smashed To Bits

Choice 5: turn around and head INTO the sea. Into deep water under sail. And wait for help to tow you back in calm conditions. I much rather be shaken around for 48 hours than smashed to bits in 1. Short of a major storm, a cat will have no issues getting sloshed around in a nasty sea. Now if its a charter haha..





Quote:
Originally Posted by capn_billl View Post
Boat vs rock is never going to end well.

Like any disaster a chain of events leads to the catastrophe at the end with loss of vessel, and possible loss of life.

IN this case,

Event Chain link 1. inadequate lightning protection. I know this begs the question, but whatever steps including anchoring in a thunderstorm was obviously insufficient.

Event Chain link 2. No backup electronics, Both engines were offline. Not atypical with electronic engines where a single transistor can make them inoperative.

SO at this point the boat is in no immediate danger. Repeated lightening strikes are unlikely to do further damage than, well, TAKE OUT BOTH ENGINES.

Up to now the boat owner is reacting, instead of proacting.

NOW is the time to make a decision, hopefully one that doesn't make the problem even worse.

Choices...

Choice 1. Stay put. The boat isn't sinking at this point. Close all seacocks, and examine Bilge area, and all seacocks, and hoses for damage, prepare stoppers, and waterproof tape, and or adhesive for any leaks.
Try to get any bilge pump, or dewatering device working, and test for successful operation. Which then leads to ....

Choice 2. Leave the boat, apparently an option as the boat is anchored within dinghy distance from shore.

Downside, you are leaving a damaged boat unattended. You may have to get shore lodging, and risk a dinghy run in the same severe weather that damaged the first boat.

Upsides. If you wait for a good weather window to dinghy ashore, you can wait for optimum conditions. From shore you can contact towing, and engine mechanic, Assuming radio is down on boat, you now have access to help, and parts to repair boat.

Hanging out in a hotel while not cheap is generally safe.

From now on additional choices are higher risk.

Choice 3. Move the boat to a shallow anchorage to minimize risk of sinking.

You are now taking a damaged craft from the secure anchorage you've had it in until now, and intentionally placing it in harms way. There is no way to sugar coat Navigating with a broke boat, NO Chartplotter, depth finder, and NO ENGINES.

Choice 4. (The choice attempted) Drive a BROKE boat into a narrow channel lined with rocks under ail alone, with NO ENGINES, and adverse currents, and wind.

With predictable results.
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