Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 25-08-2017, 13:19   #46
Registered User
 
Scout 30's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Florida
Boat: Scout 30
Posts: 3,112
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

Dinghies are like condoms. It's better to have it & not need it than need it & not have it.
Scout 30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-08-2017, 17:19   #47
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 20
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ranger42c View Post
And what is your foredeck doing that would make that space more useful for something else? What difference would the extra weight (I'd have thought trivial) make to your travel speed?

FWIW, we never used ours for transport on the ICW -- when we were anchored, we stayed aboard a chilled on purpose -- but we did have to use the dinghy to deploy a kedge once...

-Chris
Well, for starters I suspect that not having the dinghy on the foredeck would certainly make going forward to drop and weigh anchor, rig the boat for downwind sailing or deal with a problem with the roller furling unit or the roller-furling genoa a much safer and easier proposition -- there simply isn't a whole lot of space on the foredeck of a CD 26 and none of those tasks could be accomplished without stepping on or over the dinghy or putting oneself at greater risk by trying to maneuver around it. But, I could get around that issue by following the suggestion that someone made earlier in this thread and stowing the dinghy in the forepeak of the V-berth.

The weight of the dinghy and motor (probably on the order of 80 lbs, combined) isn't that big a deal by itself, but when you consider that it will be added to the weight of two men and their personal and safety gear, water and provisions to last several weeks, fuel, ground tackle (three anchors with chain and rode for each), batteries, etc., etc., then you begin to talk about some serious weight, which is why I am trying to limit what I take on board to only those items which are necessary. I am less concerned with speed (if going fast was a goal, I sure wouldn't own a Cape Dory! ) than with minimizing fuel consumption.

The most compelling argument for taking the dinghy is its value if I need to set an anchor for kedging. But, it occurs to me that I could also use a heavy duty towable tube, which would take up a lot less space and weigh much less than my dinghy, for that purpose. Anyway, I am still weighing the pros and cons and I appreciate everybody's feedback.
Bibster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-08-2017, 17:27   #48
S/V rubber ducky
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Florida cruising currently
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 19,061
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

Acturally even though based on the OPs initial post I would say he doesn't need to take the dinghy:

The real bottom line is that it is better to have it and not need it than it is to need it and not have it.

Beyond that there's not really anything to consider.
__________________
It is OK if others want to do it different on THEIR boat
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-08-2017, 19:07   #49
Registered User
 
zboss's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: On a boat
Boat: 1987 Cabo Rico 38 #117 (sold) & 2008 Manta 42 #124
Posts: 4,165
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

I've thought about this a bunch more.... so here goes.

You are going to want to take a breather at some point and having that dinghy would be darn useful. When you get to Florida the most economical method of mooring for a week or two (or month) besides anchoring, is mooring. So if you anchor or pick up a mooring you will need a dinghy unless you want to be stuck on the boat.

Of course, in places like St. Augustine, they have a shuttle service out to the mooring field but it ends fairly early - just about the time I'm finishing my second beer of the evening ashore. Sucks being stuck ashore. Yeah you can probably hitch a ride with someone but you never know.

You are going to want to do laundry. You either get a dock and pay a lot of money just to do your laundry or you anchor out and dinghy in with your laundry.

You are going to want to do grocery shopping... nice to have transpo.

You are going to want to visit other boats for sundowners - you will need a dinghy unless they come pick you up and return you. Most cruisers will do this but it's nice having the freedom.

You are going to pass places that look like fun stops and you are going to want to drop anchor and visit - you will need a dinghy.

Maybe you just want to explore an estuary.

Lots of reasons to bring a dinghy and much fewer reasons not too.

There are ways around all of that. You will be fine towing your dinghy and there really isn't a reason to go into a marina at all if you have a dinghy - I don't imagine you carry that much water and fuel that you could not haul them using 5 gallon jerry jugs.

My vote is to bring that dinghy.
zboss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-08-2017, 22:54   #50
Registered User
 
Taichungman's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Texas and Taiwan
Posts: 216
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

I can't say much about he ICW on East coast but I spent 2 years living aboard in the 80's in and out of the ICW from Texas to Florida. I had a hard dingy lashed on top but never really needed it. It did come in handy when I stayed in one spot for a few months for the kids to play in, even though I was at dock.

Lots of places to go aground on the ICW and would come in handy if you had to dingy a anchor out. By the way I was in a cat with 3' draft and still found plenty of places to go aground. Luckily it was usually shallow enough I waded out with my anchor sometimes up to my neck.

Lots of places to tie up from Texas to Florida. Tied up a lots of private docks with owners permission; lots of good folks out there. I also tied up at some when the owner wasn't around; they were probably good folks too.
__________________
The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
Taichungman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 12:40   #51
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 931
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

A 70 year old man just kayaked from the US to the U.K.

http://www.canoekayak.com/news/70-ye...n-keeps-going/

Yes, you can go inshore without your dinghy. It is a trade off of inconveniences - dealing with it vs dealing without it.
SecondBase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2017, 10:16   #52
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Erie, Pa, Summerville,SC
Boat: Seaward 25, Catalina 350
Posts: 126
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

Can't tell you if you need a dinghy on the icw, but I can tell you what is working well for us on a smaller cruising boat (Seaward 25).

We do have a porta bote, and that works pretty well, but the last couple of years we have found we like taking our Sea Eagle 370 inflatable kayak much better. It's inexpensive and tough enough to take a dog in it. We found that it paddles well even in a headwind, and is lots of fun for exploring around anchorages. It is easily inflated on deck, so it's no real issue to deflate it, but we found that it tows great, and doesn't effect our speed by any noticeable amount. The porta bote is more practical for hauling things. When we take our fold up bikes with us, it's a better choice for hauling them to shore, but the kayak is so easy to deal with on a small boat it's the dingy of choice for us.
sesmith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2017, 12:47   #53
Registered User
 
Scout 30's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Florida
Boat: Scout 30
Posts: 3,112
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

Kayaks can be hard on your butt so we've been thinking about adding a couple of inflatable paddle boards. The bigger ones appear to be pretty stable & you can attach a seat to some of them & use them like a kayak. I saw someone using a cooler for a seat on one last week.
Scout 30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2017, 13:48   #54
Registered User
 
rwidman's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: North Charleston, SC
Boat: Camano Troll
Posts: 5,074
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

Quote:
Originally Posted by zboss View Post
I've thought about this a bunch more.... so here goes.

You are going to want to take a breather at some point and having that dinghy would be darn useful. When you get to Florida the most economical method of mooring for a week or two (or month) besides anchoring, is mooring. So if you anchor or pick up a mooring you will need a dinghy unless you want to be stuck on the boat.

Of course, in places like St. Augustine, they have a shuttle service out to the mooring field but it ends fairly early - just about the time I'm finishing my second beer of the evening ashore. Sucks being stuck ashore. Yeah you can probably hitch a ride with someone but you never know.

You are going to want to do laundry. You either get a dock and pay a lot of money just to do your laundry or you anchor out and dinghy in with your laundry.

You are going to want to do grocery shopping... nice to have transpo.

You are going to want to visit other boats for sundowners - you will need a dinghy unless they come pick you up and return you. Most cruisers will do this but it's nice having the freedom.

You are going to pass places that look like fun stops and you are going to want to drop anchor and visit - you will need a dinghy.

Maybe you just want to explore an estuary.

Lots of reasons to bring a dinghy and much fewer reasons not too.

There are ways around all of that. You will be fine towing your dinghy and there really isn't a reason to go into a marina at all if you have a dinghy - I don't imagine you carry that much water and fuel that you could not haul them using 5 gallon jerry jugs.

My vote is to bring that dinghy.
All those things are far easier with the boat at a slip in the marina. Far, far easier. Yes, you have to pay for the slip but not everyone is on a boat because they are cheap. And many marinas will charge to land a dinghy. After all, it is a boat. It's taking up space and you are using marina services.
__________________
Ron
HIGH COTTON
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2017, 16:48   #55
Moderator
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 19,903
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
All those things are far easier with the boat at a slip in the marina. Far, far easier. Yes, you have to pay for the slip but not everyone is on a boat because they are cheap. And many marinas will charge to land a dinghy. After all, it is a boat. It's taking up space and you are using marina services.
Ron, there are some of us who just don't much like being in a marina when an anchorage is available. Sure, many jobs are easier when in a marina, but the same argument says that it is easier to get to your destination by car or by air. You chose to go by boat because you enjoy it. I enjoy being at anchor, and having a dinghy to enhance that experience. I am not alone in this...

Jim
__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II, still hanging out in Port Cygnet. Summer was nice... it was on a Tuesday... and now winter has descended upon Tasmania. Brrr.
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2017, 17:51   #56
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Palm Coast Florida
Boat: 2018 Seadoo GTX 230
Posts: 1,059
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

I live not far from the ICW in Florida. I see the larger sailboats motor pulling a dingy but not the smaller sailboats.

Where I am located (Bings Landing) a dingy would not help. It is a good place to dock a small sailboat and get a BBQ sandwich. From there you can walk across A1A and get a pizza.
tuffr2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2017, 18:35   #57
Registered User
 
Scout 30's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Florida
Boat: Scout 30
Posts: 3,112
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Ron, there are some of us who just don't much like being in a marina when an anchorage is available. Sure, many jobs are easier when in a marina, but the same argument says that it is easier to get to your destination by car or by air. You chose to go by boat because you enjoy it. I enjoy being at anchor, and having a dinghy to enhance that experience. I am not alone in this...

Jim
We're the same. Never stay at a marina if we can help it.
Scout 30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2017, 19:38   #58
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 931
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scout 30 View Post
Kayaks can be hard on your butt so we've been thinking about adding a couple of inflatable paddle boards. The bigger ones appear to be pretty stable & you can attach a seat to some of them & use them like a kayak. I saw someone using a cooler for a seat on one last week.


Inflatable PB are amazing. The largest of them will easily float 3 people and light gear. Cooler snorkeling etc. And they paddle easily and track beyond expectations. So stable. I only used it on flat water for a day but it was a pleasure.

PB anchor when you get to that perfect picnic spot - force your paddles down like a fishing boats "Power Pole" and you can pin the dinghy to the bottom. Obviously for light, attended conditions only like a lunch stop.
SecondBase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-08-2017, 02:47   #59
Registered User
 
rwidman's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: North Charleston, SC
Boat: Camano Troll
Posts: 5,074
Re: Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Ron, there are some of us who just don't much like being in a marina when an anchorage is available. Sure, many jobs are easier when in a marina, but the same argument says that it is easier to get to your destination by car or by air. You chose to go by boat because you enjoy it. I enjoy being at anchor, and having a dinghy to enhance that experience. I am not alone in this...

Jim
We go by boat because we enjoy it also but for us, the journey is the destination. We like to stop at the small towns and big cities along the way. Anchoring off a city doesn't do much for us so we take a slip at a marina in town and meet the people, enjoy the sights, restaurants and whatever the town or marina has to offer.

If we're trying to make time or distance, we're more apt to anchor because it means more time underway and yes, it does save a few dollars. I will very seldom pull into a marina late in the day and pull out early the next morning.

In the OP's case, he has a dinghy but has reasons to leave it behind. It's his decision based on his anticipated circumstances.
__________________
Ron
HIGH COTTON
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-09-2017, 18:55   #60
Registered User
 
zboss's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: On a boat
Boat: 1987 Cabo Rico 38 #117 (sold) & 2008 Manta 42 #124
Posts: 4,165
Is a dinghy a necessity for the ICW?

There is the argument that having a smaller boat makes it more affordable to get a slip, assuming they charge by the length and not the slip size. At 26 feet he may pay an average of maybe $2 a foot, at an average of 30 days or so heading south he could spend about $1600 in marina fees for the trip. Probably a lot less but still not Chump change.
zboss is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
dinghy, icw

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Driven by Necessity usmc_mickey Meets & Greets 27 12-06-2010 09:27
Is the Yankee a Necessity for a Cutter Rig? ecojimbo Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 2 18-08-2009 05:44
Necessity and installation of a depth sounder in a steel boat... Boracay Construction, Maintenance & Refit 21 10-01-2008 22:53

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 13:55.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.