Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 26-11-2018, 18:57   #46
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 67
Re: Does it matter order of battery disconnection in a car?

Car electrical systems these days have computers that stay connected all the time. There is always a small current drain because of the computer draw, about one ampere. One ampere is sufficient to cause a spark. A spark could easily ignite the hydrogen gas that may be given off by a battery; however, a battery usually only gives off this gas when being charged. It dissipates very rapidly and does not "hang around" the battery caps very long. Still, hydrogen gas is very explosive and it will blow your battery to pieces and splatter you with hot acid if you ignite it. Dangerous. Accordingly, you should ventilate the area around the battery before removing any connections on it - just waving a rag over the battery ten times will get rid of any gas outside the battery. Now, you cannot get rid of the gas inside the battery so you still must be careful. Even a small explosion is not a good thing. When disconnecting terminals or checking a battery with a tester it is best to cover the battery with a small sheet of rubber so you do not accidentally cause a short circuit. Always disconnect the negative connection first. The reason for this is that those computers run on 5 volts, not 12 volts. If you touch the frame of the car with the positive lead or a wrench connected to it you will not only get a nice shower of sparks that might cause a gas explosion, the frame forms the negative side of the feed to the computers. It is possible to fry the computers by placing even a transient 12 volt power surge to them as might occur with the negative lead still connected and the positive lead arcing to the frame. Reversing the leads when jump starting the car is a common way that computers get ruined but arcs from the positive terminal can do it too. In summary, be very careful around batteries because they hold a great deal of energy, emit explosive hydrogen gas, and the entire system is designed for the battery to be connected and disconnected in a certain order - take off the negative first.
__________________

lituya1617 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-11-2018, 07:57   #47
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Grosse Ile, mi./Bradenton,Fld.
Boat: Pearson 32
Posts: 3
Images: 1
Re: Does it matter order of battery disconnection in a car?

I winter store a 2018 Ford Escape by removing the negative battery cable. The positive post/cable connection is buried under the firewall making cable removal nearly impossible without removing engine components that block the battery preventing room to slide the battery forward to clear the firewall. I chose to leave the positive cable connected. Anyone see an issue with this. I am gone for 6 months.
RH
__________________

pearson 32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-11-2018, 13:50   #48
Certifiable Refitter/Senior Wannbe
 
Wotname's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: South of 43 S, Australia
Boat: C.L.O.D.
Posts: 11,194
Re: Does it matter order of battery disconnection in a car?

^^ I can't see any issue. Having either pole disconnected leaves the battery open circuit and as the negative pole should always be removed first and refitted last, your method is sound.
__________________
All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangereous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. T.E. Lawrence
Wotname is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 28-11-2018, 19:56   #49
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 67
Re: Does it matter order of battery disconnection in a car?

Pearson32: Because lead-acid batteries are damaged by being allowed to discharge fully and because all such batteries have a small internal electrical drain and will discharge over a few months, it is a really bad idea to leave a battery disconnected when storing a vehicle. Batteries allowed to go completely dead and cold suffer damage and may never be able to be used again. May I suggest that you leave the battery connected in your vehicle and attach a "trickle charger" to it rather than just disconnecting it? I bought a "smart charger" for only $7 and I have used it on my lawn tractor during the winter months. Any of my batteries not in use are on a charger. I have never had a battery go dead! My boat batteries are on a Constavolt system and stay fully charged. I attribute success with batteries this to carefully keeping all my batteries charged and properly filled with distilled water. I have had batteries on my commercial fishing boat that lasted over 15 years. Lawn mower batteries are notorious for only lasting for one season - not the fault of the battery; rather, it is because they die without their internal resistance being overcome with a charger. My lawn tractor has a battery in it that is 16 years old. The thing that kills batteries is a short circuit at the base of the internal plates caused by lead sulfide that precipitates and eventually builds up around the lead plates in the battery - this deposition happens much more rapidly when the battery is allowed to discharge fully. This short quickly drains the battery and may so damage the plates that you get a "dead cell" with high resistance that makes the battery useless. The proper care of batteries will save you a lot of time and aggravation.
lituya1617 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-11-2018, 18:28   #50
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Grosse Ile, mi./Bradenton,Fld.
Boat: Pearson 32
Posts: 3
Images: 1
Re: Does it matter order of battery disconnection in a car?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lituya1617 View Post
Pearson32: Because lead-acid batteries are damaged by being allowed to discharge fully and because all such batteries have a small internal electrical drain and will discharge over a few months, it is a really bad idea to leave a battery disconnected when storing a vehicle. Batteries allowed to go completely dead and cold suffer damage and may never be able to be used again. May I suggest that you leave the battery connected in your vehicle and attach a "trickle charger" to it rather than just disconnecting it? I bought a "smart charger" for only $7 and I have used it on my lawn tractor during the winter months. Any of my batteries not in use are on a charger. I have never had a battery go dead! My boat batteries are on a Constavolt system and stay fully charged. I attribute success with batteries this to carefully keeping all my batteries charged and properly filled with distilled water. I have had batteries on my commercial fishing boat that lasted over 15 years. Lawn mower batteries are notorious for only lasting for one season - not the fault of the battery; rather, it is because they die without their internal resistance being overcome with a charger. My lawn tractor has a battery in it that is 16 years old. The thing that kills batteries is a short circuit at the base of the internal plates caused by lead sulfide that precipitates and eventually builds up around the lead plates in the battery - this deposition happens much more rapidly when the battery is allowed to discharge fully. This short quickly drains the battery and may so damage the plates that you get a "dead cell" with high resistance that makes the battery useless. The proper care of batteries will save you a lot of time and aggravation.
Thank you for the response; however, I Winter store fully charged boat batteries without a trickle charge outdoors in Michigan and come spring after re-connecting them the Diesel engine cranks and fires without issues. I use to haul them down a ladder and store/charge them in my basement until one year I fell from the ladder while carrying them up to the boat. Talking with fellow boaters, I heard that battery manufacturers cold store them to help maintain the charge. I was sold on the idea of leaving them on the boat.
I do trickle charge my Porsche with a Ďsmartí automatic charger to avoid shutting down the computer. Not sure a $7 charger would have the capability of a trickle charge without overcharging. I could be wrong, not sure I would trust it unattended. The Escape is also stored disconnected as I described earlier in a cold garage.
In addition, I store a vehicle for 6 summer months in Florida by simply disconnecting that battery. I did have to boost start that battery, but once it was up and running it maintained a charge. No issues.
The temperature difference over similar storage periods appears to be having the affect you might expect.
RH
__________________

pearson 32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
battery

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale: Toggle car / Bayonet car for whisker and spinnaker poles justsammer General Classifieds (no boats) 6 03-05-2019 19:58
For Sale: Turncouple hose connection/disconnection assemblies $50.00 Watercolor Classifieds Archive 0 06-02-2012 11:08
So, does size really matter?? isbolick Monohull Sailboats 43 30-07-2008 05:59

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 20:31.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.