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Old 10-07-2021, 03:49   #1
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Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

Friends were sailing their Seawind 1160 Cat from Hawaii to Puget Sound... around 40 56.338n 159 24.352w they hit something and lost part of the bow.

Quote:
We got our reef 2 set because I have to get on the cabin top for reef 1 and I didn’t feel like it. Reef 2 left us powered down just right if not a bit much, then Isabel informed me we’d have to drop the screecher and retract the bowsprit because it appeared the starboard guy had failed. That kind of torqued me off, because we put new ones on in 2019. Anyway, I went forward to find the the guy hadn’t failed, but the bow had. The guy was in the water trailing at the piece of bow structure it’s attached to. Kind of in disbelief I retrieved the assembly to the deck and then took a look at the starboard lower bow, or at least where there used to be one.
Pretty much gone, with the seas pounding against the flat collision bulkhead about one meter aft of the bow. The upper bow structure where the cross beam attaches looked good, and if it had failed as well the mast would have crashed down then there would likely have been a louder noise. I don’t like loud noises,
Well, we’re now hove-to, main at 2 reefs and set hard to the starboard side of the boat, and wheel turning us hard the starboard direction. We’ve been zigzagging downwind at about 1 knot for around 24 hours now. Sucks to give up all that Northing we had worked so hard to earn, and we had just finally turned towards the East and set a waypoint at the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca so we count down the miles. Nuts.
We didn’t have the most restful of nights, but we’re still here and have been working the problem all day with the Seawind factory folks and some rather smart pals in the aircraft mechanics and composites fields. We’ve photographed damage bits using our waterproof GoPro and sent the pics to the guys. We’ve been in touch with the US Coast Guard and they’re aware of our plight. If we declare an emergency they will divert a vessel towards us, and the good news is there are quite a few ships moving through the area.


They spent the next day fabricating some protection.... more on their blog if interested.....
Now attempting to get back 1600 nm to Port Townsend...


their blog and tracker: https://forecast.predictwind.com/tra...play/JollyDogs
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Old 10-07-2021, 03:59   #2
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

Quite a tale [very well written]!
Here's wishing Mark & Isabel all the best luck, moving forward.
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Old 10-07-2021, 05:00   #3
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

They seem like they are pretty good a getting out of a pinch. I love all the make shift fixing
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Old 10-07-2021, 05:22   #4
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

WHen I read Post #1, my initial reaction was: They thought a guy had failed? They didn't notice hitting something that caused that much damage?

But I see on the blog: " Yesterday around 1730, just after the Pacific Seafarer’s Net on the Ham radio were tooling along thinking we should reef, and I was making a repair to the main halyard before we commenced that operation. Somewhere around that time there was an enormous bang and I found myself on the cockpit sole. Not sure if I was unconscious for a few seconds or not, "

Their next blog post is very impressive. It shows some really good McGyvering.

"It’s been a rather busy day. Fabricating reinforcement braces, cutting up a diesel jerry can to act as a bow structure, bolting it partly on, all in all we earned our dinner. The weather is chilly and we’re surrounded by fog at times, so getting the fiberglass surfaces we need to bond the epoxy in proper condition has been impossible due to condensation. We finally got the surfaces down to the same temperature as the outside environment, so tomorrow we’ll hopefully have dry surfaces to sand and bond to.
We also did our best to fashion a crude bow section using some bits of fiberglass sheet and a plastic diesel jerry can. We got that partly bolted on today before the clock ran out. Hopefully wrap that up tomorrow along with the fiberglass work."
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Old 10-07-2021, 09:26   #5
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

Thanks for posting
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Old 10-07-2021, 09:34   #6
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

in their lastest update:


Quote:
JollyDogs Captains Log Supplemental Saturday 10 Jul 21

Sat Jul 10 2021
I totally spaced out a couple of items yesterday.
A school of orcas swam past yesterday. We lost some work time just staring at those beautiful animals - it was an awesome sight. They were close and we could hear them breathing. It was such an amazing thing I decided not to get in the water to work on the hull until we didn’t see them anymore.
Also, our friends on SV Maple who are well West of us passed a refrigerator in the water around 3 days ago. Last night our new best friends on SV Lady Amber, a 20 meter research vessel who are only about 3 miles from us and closing fast, noted that they had passed 2 refrigerators in the past few days. Seems like cargo ships lose containers overboard in big storms, then stuff gets loose. What’s anybody doing about that?
Anyway, that’s what I forgot that I can remember. Brain is kind of full right now, but we’ve received well wishes from folks we’ve never hear of and we do appreciate it.
Cheers all y’all!
refrigerators floating about.... hmmm...
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Old 10-07-2021, 11:39   #7
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

We missed an industrial size refrigerator/freezer by about 15 feet in the Florida keys.We were traveling at 18 knots.Bobbing just below the surface. Scary.
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Old 10-07-2021, 15:36   #8
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

Probably a log. A container would have done far more damage.

I was interested in a Trimaran but did not buy it--the fellow who did was sailing it home when he hit a half full 44 gallon drum of fuel floating on the surface. It struck the centre hull and bounced off to the starboard, damaging also the starboard hull. In spite of some rescue clowns trying to tow it bow first (smacks forehead) the vessel sank.

Floating stuff is a serious and increasing problem.
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Old 11-07-2021, 01:34   #9
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

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We missed an industrial size refrigerator/freezer by about 15 feet in the Florida keys.We were traveling at 18 knots.Bobbing just below the surface. Scary.
You were on a submarine?
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Old 11-07-2021, 16:51   #10
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

From their blog (more there.. but thought this was good)


Quote:
Thoughts About Emergencies at Sea Part 1 Sunday 11 Jul 21

Sun Jul 11 2021
This stuff always happens to the other sailors, the other boats, and the rest of us hear about it via some form of media or perhaps in a bar where someone is regaling us with “tales of the sea”. It’s the same thing with aviation mishaps. There are a lot of arm chair sailors and pilots, and they often reach conclusions about what the sailor or pilot should have done, and what THEY would have done to avoid some disaster. These days the internet serves as a voice to amplify their opinions, but mostly they exist in a chat room environment where they jack their jaws at one another.
What’s interesting in the past few days is that we’ve been receiving short emails from various individuals who only wish to let us know they’re aware of our plight and theiy’re thoughts are with us. We’ve also received an email from a boat architect offering ideas about the structural robustness of this boat and how we should be able to safely make it to port. Folks just coming out of the blue, taking the time to say “I give a damn”. It’s impossible to express enough gratitude for such messages, and the incredibly positive impact it has had on our morale over the past few days. Certainly we’re not soliciting cheery messages and it’s terribly important that we keep the data load very low for our satellite communications system but please know that we’re terribly grateful for encouragement.
This sort of situation becomes a mind game, and it’s easy to let dark thoughts creep in. Isabel does tend to be a glass half full kind of person; not sure if it’s her English upbringing or just the way she is, but by golly that woman is tough as old boots and has kept a stiff upper lip about all this. I do believe a bit in the national psyche that exists in a country due to the events the population has experienced. World War II informs me about the toughness of the English. “Could be worse” is their idea of optimism.
I’m a glass overflowing kind of person, but also an engineer with a background in structures, noise and vibration, deep sea oil exploration, prototype car development and experimental helicopter flight test. For much of my career I’ve worked in a very high hazard environment, either living in it myself or working hard to ensure a test pilot’s life is protected. My perspective is different from Isabel’s and I look at a problem in terms of inputs or actions and outcomes.
There’s a tremendous urge to get to land as fast as possible to get this insane nightmare over with. JollyDogs’s compromised structure makes that stupid but seawater intrusion into hull structure over time must also be considered. We’ve managed our emotions and just drifted as we work out way through the fixes we can apply given the human energy, materials and tools we have. It’s been interesting to note how fatiguing all this has been and we go to bed exhausted at night. As we’re just hove-to and drifting, we’ve enabled a flashing anchor light at the mast head and set AIS alarms in case a vessel is predicted to pass dangerously close. Even if we impact a refrigerator at this speed it shouldn’t hurt anything. We sleep like dead dogs.
We’ve almost made all the repairs we can and will likely get underway before day’s end. Conditions are favorable for a gentle downwind sail to the Northeast, and given all considerations for wind and seas the Puget Sound still looks like the smartest destination. We were talking this morning about Ketchikan, Alaska if we got seriously worried about the boat holding together, as Ketchikan is a little closer right now. We could probably get a temporary repair and ease down the inside passage to the Puget Sound to get the job done by an expert, but with our luck we’d probably hit a deadhead. Target fixation is a thing, and for us we’ve got to keep our minds open, continually evaluate how things are going and the weather, update our options and move forward.
On the bright side, at least we’re drifting towards Seattle!

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Old 12-07-2021, 07:36   #11
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

From their blog:
Quote:
41 06.425n 158 10.472w

Envelope Expansion Monday 12 Jul 21

Mon Jul 12 2021
We’ll never know what we hit unless we can identify additional hull damage, perhaps on the leading edge of the starboard keel. The GoPro on a stick didn’t reveal any indications of hull damage other than the lower starboard bow. Since a pod of orcas cruised past us the next day, I’m going with an orca attack. That sounds cool.
After 2 days of hard work implementing repairs we got underway again this evening around 1800. With 2 reefs in the main and a partial jib, in 14 knots of wind we were doing around 4.5 knots. Our objective is to limit speed to 6 knots, avoid beating into seas, and get to dry land. We can roll out a little more jib if we’re slow and roll some in if we’re getting a little too fast, and if the wind picks up much more we’ll set reef 3. If the wind comes somewhere behind us, say +/-35 degrees from the stern we’ll drop the main and roll out our twin headsail rig. We can control speed quite well with that setup, just rolling in or out how much we need. Works a charm, and more fun than jibing downwind as catamarans often do.
In the flight test business we call this “envelope expansion”. Creep out a little in speed, maneuver at up to 1.5 g’s, check stability and controllability, then creep out a little more. If things go well we develop a maneuvering envelope that we can continue to expand as desired or able. We’re kind of doing that with JollyDogs right now, and we’re being a bit timid with the speed while observing how the boat seems to handle and feel. We’re also monitoring that starboard collision bulkhead and anywhere else in the starboard hull for leaks. About 15 minutes after we got underway this Sunday evening I found a small leak in the collision bulkhead that seemed to be an initial manufacturing defect - just a tiny place underneath the holding tank shelf / bulkhead join that hadn’t been properly glassed over. I’m not sure how this was built, but the fact that water was leaking at all means it’s found its way past the forward glassed over collision bulkhead. If so, that’s not good and could potentially warn of water intrusion into the plywood and the potential for the bulkhead to weaken over time. We’ll be keeping an eye on that.
Seawind engineering suggested that it might be prudent to fabricate and install a second lower bulkhead section a few inches aft of the collision bulkhead, something that reached well above the static waterline so that if the bulkhead began leaking we could stop the boat and the water would be contained. I did that and have decided to cannibalize the port bilge electric pump to install in that cavity. In the event a leak occurs that pump will be plumbed to the forward head sink drain so we can manage a smaller leak, perhaps up to several hundred gallons per hour. Anything worse and we’re going to key the mic and say “MayDay”. We’re not sure if JollyDogs would actually sink if one hull flooded, but she certainly wouldn’t sail or motor.
I also added a couple of cross braces on the collision bulkhead to stiffen it up and help prevent “drumming” from water pounding against it. On the outside, our saviors from Lady Amber cut away all the ragged fiberglass they cold, stuffed a plethora of buoyant items into the front cavity then secured a fishing net around it. That seems to be working out really well so far, and there’s no water leaking in through the inspection hatch as there was just after the mishap.
The weather is favorable to continue gently towards the Puget Sound. We’ve been watching the accelerated coastal winds for weeks now and it seems the California coast is particularly ugly. The Strait of Juan de Fuca gets some too but they generally seem to be less extreme and shorter in duration. For now that’s where we’re headed. We’ve got a Canadian cruising friend who’s offering his thoughts about the enroute weather; that second opinion is great and he’s got a lot more bandwidth than we do. We’re pressing on. Gently.

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Old 23-07-2021, 09:07   #12
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

I served 4 years at the USCG Search and Rescue station Yaquina Bay located in Newport, OR in the mid to late 90s. No way would I venture into rough seas there in anything that was not on par with our lifeboat's construction! lol! Kudos to them, but I think I'll stick to the low latitudes with my boat.
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Old 23-07-2021, 16:03   #13
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

@h20man:

Have you heard from them? How're they doing?

Ann
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Old 24-07-2021, 03:45   #14
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

Their latest post:

Tracking
Jolly Dogs
48 53.626n 128 21.640w

Gratitude Friday 23 Jul 21
Sat Jul 24 2021

Years ago at a business class the lecturer made a point that has always stuck with me. He asked what people wanted more than anything else? Money? Authority? Responsibility? The consensus was that people want to be appreciated. Acknowledged for their contribution. Valued.

The fat lady hasn’t sung yet, but we’re pretty sure we’re going to make landfall in one piece. We’ve got a hot date with a travel lift at Port Townsend 0800 Thursday morning and we’re planning to be on time. We’re going to get really busy and distracted and we may fail to do something very important. We may fail to say thank you to everyone who has emailed us with a note of support, provided us with critical information or physically assisted.

Michael of SV Peregrine Heart got word to RV Lady Amber about our situation. The captain and crew altered course and arrived the following morning, working hard for two days to help us. The crew of that vessel included Captains Ryan and Leesa Strothers along with crew members Louis Jones and former US Navy diver Kaden James Silvers. What they did for us was monumental and the bow bandaid they created and installed is still in place doing its job They may well have made the difference between us getting to shore under our own power or issuing a Mayday call.

Seawind Catamarans founder Richard Ward and Mike Rees who I believe is now production manager (or is that Shane Grover) and their support staff have had our back, doing an amazing job of responding to all our questions and concerns, greatly improving our confidence in the strength of this Seawind 1160 design. That collision bulkhead remains solid more than 2 weeks after our mishap, as does the fiberglass structure where the forward cross beam attaches.

US Coast Guard stations RCC Alameda and JRCC Juneau have been keeping an eye on us, responding to our questions about emergency declarations and protocols. Dan and Cub, old friends and work associates, both former USCG helicopter rescue pilots have helped us through this with information on emergency response times, types of assistance the USCG can render deep at sea, checklists of items to prepare should we be forced to abandon the boat, you name it. They’ve helped develop our confidence to manage the situation properly, not to delay a Mayday call if one is warranted, and to assure us the USCG will bust their asses to save ours.

Travis of Hawaii Yacht Club and dock mate Curt who assisted in the initial email hook up with the USCG. Bill and Mike and Brad who are like family to us and have gone to the end of the Earth for us over the years. Shaun who has watched over us with his excellent weather observations. Spike and Joe who helped me bring the port engine back to life. Evan the marine architect who offered guidance on speed control to ensure the collision bulkhead would maintain structural integrity. John and Pat and Joe, old flight test associates who have been cheering us on.

Jamie and Behan for their encouragement, thoughts about at-sea repairs and weather routing to minimize structural loads underway. Stephen and Debbie who made arrangements for our haul out and repairs at Port Townsend. Ann and John and Phil who have offered observations about navigating the tides in the Strait. Uncle Bill who has kept us laughing through this entire escapade. Kevin who stored and prepped our car for the road trip from hell, and Karin who’s driving it to us in Port Townsend. My brother Kirk and sister Lisa, Isabel’s dad Paul and uncle David, the crews of Beethoven, Sea Rose, Taipan, Ari B, Sugar Shack, Avalon, Liward, Grace, Fly Aweigh, Halcyon, Ultegra, Bella Marina, Champagne, Flyin’ Sideways, Aldabra, Maple, Cake, Katie Kat, Nomad, Amarylis, Omaha, Wight Dog, St. Leger, Wheytogo, Catharsis, Wyspa, Sparkle, Tsaritsa, Snapdragon and Nine Lives, PacSeaNet manager Jane and her relay helpers and all the other folks who have held us in their thoughts and prayers.

You have kept us going. Thank you.
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Old 24-07-2021, 03:50   #15
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Re: Another Victim of ?? in the Pacific

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@h20man:

Have you heard from them? How're they doing?

Ann

They are now about 175 miles to go to Cape Flattery (the Pacific Ocean start of the Strait of Juan de Fuca).. limping along at 5.5 knots..

The repair is working..



A writeup by latitude38 is here: https://www.latitude38.com/lectronic...ific-crossing/


They had an emergency repair that they did (all explained on their blog) and are limping in.


These photos of the collision damage were published by Latitude 38.


I am looking forward to see photos of how they attempted repair..






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