Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 21-07-2020, 11:48   #1
eje
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 15
Okeechobee

I was planning to cross Florida east>west via the canal but understand the person who heels boats over to clear the Port Mayaca Bridge died about a year ago. Has anyone been through there lately?
eje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-07-2020, 13:19   #2
Registered User
 
AA3JY's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kimberton,Pa.
Boat: Cabo Rico 34
Posts: 527
Re: Okeechobee

I hear there is a blue-green tide affecting the Lake..not sure if travel is allowed..may need current conditions.

https://www.winknews.com/2020/06/22/...e-algae-bloom/
AA3JY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-07-2020, 14:00   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 3,667
Re: Okeechobee

Recommend you contact the marina out of which the "Okeechobee Limbo"
service was previously offered for guidance.

Indiantown Marina
16300 SW Famel Avenue,
Indiantown, FL 34956

Phone:
772-597-2455

Fax:
772-597-2451

Email:
indiantownmarina@juno.com

Bridges Across the Okeechobee Waterway

Depending on the route across Lake Okeechobee that you choose, there are 25 or 26 bridges crossing the Okeechobee Waterway between the junctions with the AICW and the GICW. One additional bridge will be encountered if headed out into the Gulf of Mexico.

Fifteen of these bridges are considered high level fixed bridges with the remaining 10 or 11 being operating bridges.

In addition to the bridges, there are also approximately 25 overhead cable crossings on the Okeechobee Waterway. ]The lowest is 3.1 NM east of the Port Mayaca RR Lift Bridge with an authorized clearance of 56’.

Bridge Clearances
The high level fixed bridges offer vertical clearances of 54’ or greater. The operating bridges offer closed vertical clearances of between 5’ and 27’.

Fortunately, many of the low level operating bridges are either railroad bridges that are normally open (except in the event of a train crossing) or others which open on demand with some restrictions.

A complete listing of all bridges along with their locations, vertical clearances, and operating restrictions is shown below. This file is available for download for your personal and private use.

https://www.offshoreblue.com/assets/oww/oww-bridges.pdf

This list is believed to be accurate as of July 2020.

The Port Mayaca RR Lift Bridge
One of the biggest hurdles for sailboats using the Okeechobee Waterway is the Port Mayaca RR Bridges’ 49’ vertical clearance. Unfortunately, with this portion of the waterway being non-tidal that means there is no waiting for low tide to squeeze a possible few extra feet under the bridge.

However, lower canal water levels may often present an opportunity! Any time that the St. Lucie Canal is below its normal pool level of 14.5’; the result will be an equal increase in vertical clearances at all affected bridges.
Montanan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-07-2020, 14:05   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 3,667
Re: Okeechobee

Water quality status dashboard for the lake:

https://protectingfloridatogether.go...ake-okeechobee
Montanan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-07-2020, 14:28   #5
eje
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 15
Re: Okeechobee

The Port Mayaca Bridge at 49 ft is the only one that might be an obstacle for me.

I did call the Indiantown Marina. They told me the person who heels the boats did not work out of the marina, had died and they did not believe anybody else had picked up the business. That is why I'm posting here. I thought if somebody here sails that area or had been through in the last year, they might be able to provide an up-date.
eje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-07-2020, 11:34   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Central New Jersey USA
Boat: Cape Dory 28 (Sold Nov 2019)
Posts: 234
Re: Okeechobee

Quote:
Originally Posted by eje View Post
I was planning to cross Florida east>west via the canal but understand the person who heels boats over to clear the Port Mayaca Bridge died about a year ago. Has anyone been through there lately?
If you post the height of your rig (all inclusive) maybe some other ideas will follow.
__________________
Good luck and good sailing.
s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
kerrydeare is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-07-2020, 11:44   #7
eje
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 15
Re: Okeechobee

Quote:
Originally Posted by kerrydeare View Post
If you post the height of your rig (all inclusive) maybe some other ideas will follow.
It's a new boat, I'm not sure. The "I" is 46 ft, I'm not at the boat so can't measure the base of the mast to the water. I'm guessing the bridge clearance height would be 49-53
eje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-07-2020, 12:04   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Central New Jersey USA
Boat: Cape Dory 28 (Sold Nov 2019)
Posts: 234
Re: Okeechobee

Quote:
Originally Posted by eje View Post
... I'm guessing the bridge clearance height would be 49-53
That's a range that spans "possible" to "impossible." Indiantown Marina had in the past been difficult for some folks in that their fuel was at times questionable, and their service the same. I'm not sure why that was the case, but I definitely am sure it was. I'm not now suggesting this is the current situation and I hope the Indiantown folks understand this (and also admit of the past).

If the clearance issue was in the vicinity of 1 or even 2 feet, we often hung the dinghy off one side or the other and filled it with sufficient water to heel the yacht and just get by. Some of this prep was done in the marina, of course, and involved a bit of imagination. Then during the transit someone went up the rig in the chair and guided the boat through to make sure damage was minimized. This sometimes resulted in just turning around and going "the long way" to get to the FL west side.

Fortunately for me I always traveled on a small boat and this was not an issue, but at times I participlated in these strange and exciting events.
__________________
Good luck and good sailing.
s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
kerrydeare is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-07-2020, 12:25   #9
running down a dream

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: somewhere in the deep south
Boat: CD30 MKII
Posts: 2,168
Images: 6
Send a message via Yahoo to gonesail
Re: Okeechobee

run a tape measure up one of your halyards to water line. add some for your VHF antennae. then you will know
__________________
some of the best times of my life were spent on a boat. it just took a long time to realize it

gonesail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-07-2020, 12:28   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 3,667
Re: Okeechobee

FYI, current status of the lake.

Reference link: USACE Jacksonville District

Today's Lake Okeechobee Stage = 12.81 (Feet-NGVD29)

Today's Route 1 Navigational Depth ≈ 6.75 Feet
Today's Route 2 Navigational Depth ≈ 4.95 Feet


Bridge Clearance = 50.77 Feet
S-308 Tailwater Elevation = 12.73 (Feet-NGVD29)
Report Generated 23JUL2020 @ 14:39 *

Note the bridge clearances per the standard list are when the water level is at 14.5 feet. Today the water level is 12.81 feet, hence the seasonal increase in bridge clearance is 14.5 minus 12.81 = 1.69 feet.

Of issue is that while bridge clearance / air draft increases with declining lake water level the keel draft clearance also decreases. Rather skinny water don't wander from the defined route.

Not a lot of water below the keel. The fetch on the lake can derive significant waves which thence result in even skinner water below the keel as the boat rides the troughs of the waves and can be blown from the channel.

Reference https://www.offshoreblue.com/cruisin...bee-depths.php


The above chart was created to provide mariners with a guide for navigating Route 1. This chart is based upon bathymetric surveys (2007 Channel Condition Survey) of the Okeechobee Waterway performed by the Corps of Engineers. Conditions are subject to change and mariners should remain alert and aware of the actual on water conditions. Available water depth may be temporarily impacted up to 1.1 feet by strong winds

Perhaps you could bring your own barrels and fill them to garner the requisite heeling. If you accurately know your air draft you can calculate how much heel in required. No time for guessestimates.

I suspect that the limbo service is no longer available, not much demand for such and the liability exposure would be significant because one can easily damage a boats structure by point load over weighting the deck, or loose a mast if not heeled over enough. Note the barrels can not be supported by the lifelines / stanchions they have to be supported by tying to the athwartship hardpoints on the high side.

It is not hard to just travel the ICWs, and / or go out to sea and really sail instead of motor on a ditch for miles on end.

Keep your eye out for storms, Gonzola appears to be the first of significance, not sure where it is headed later next week.
Montanan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-07-2020, 12:44   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 3,667
Re: Okeechobee

Quote:
Originally Posted by kerrydeare View Post
That's a range that spans "possible" to "impossible." Indiantown Marina had in the past been difficult for some folks in that their fuel was at times questionable, and their service the same. I'm not sure why that was the case, but I definitely am sure it was. I'm not now suggesting this is the current situation and I hope the Indiantown folks understand this (and also admit of the past).

If the clearance issue was in the vicinity of 1 or even 2 feet, we often hung the dinghy off one side or the other and filled it with sufficient water to heel the yacht and just get by. Some of this prep was done in the marina, of course, and involved a bit of imagination. Then during the transit someone went up the rig in the chair and guided the boat through to make sure damage was minimized. This sometimes resulted in just turning around and going "the long way" to get to the FL west side.

Fortunately for me I always traveled on a small boat and this was not an issue, but at times I participlated in these strange and exciting events.
Of issue with using dinghies for heeling is that they are built to keep water out not to hold a large load unsupported by displacement of the hull providing for countering force. One can bust a dinghy easily by loading it in air. Better to use a water bag or drums slung from a halyard and poled outward.
Montanan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-07-2020, 13:07   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 3,667
Re: Okeechobee

Quote:
Originally Posted by eje View Post
It's a new boat, I'm not sure. The "I" is 46 ft, I'm not at the boat so can't measure the base of the mast to the water. I'm guessing the bridge clearance height would be 49-53
Caution as to the I measurement, be certain what its true meaning is.

For example, if:

"I" is measured along the front of mast from the highest halyard to the main deck.

Or is your "I" perhaps the measure of the fore triangle height?

How far above the highest halyard does your mast extend?

Add in height of mast top equipment / antenna?

Then measure from base of mast to waterline.

If you run a tape measure up by the halyard, be sure to tie a messenger line so as to be able to retrieve the halyard back down. Don't rely on just the tape to be your return puller.

Reference diagram attached.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Air draft.PNG
Views:	17
Size:	92.6 KB
ID:	219844  
Montanan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-07-2020, 13:24   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Central New Jersey USA
Boat: Cape Dory 28 (Sold Nov 2019)
Posts: 234
Re: Okeechobee

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montanan View Post
Of issue with using dinghies for heeling is that they are built to keep water out not to hold a large load unsupported by displacement of the hull providing for countering force. One can bust a dinghy easily by loading it in air. Better to use a water bag or drums slung from a halyard and poled outward.
No question, but then we were (like perhaps other sailing bums) going on the cheap as a matter of course and we did what seemed like a good idea at the time.
__________________
Good luck and good sailing.
s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
kerrydeare is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-07-2020, 14:20   #14
eje
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 15
Re: Okeechobee

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montanan View Post
Caution as to the I measurement, be certain what its true meaning is.

For example, if:

"I" is measured along the front of mast from the highest halyard to the main deck.

Or is your "I" perhaps the measure of the fore triangle height?
===============
You are correct, I was thinking I was measured from the base of the mast, but is the sheerline. So on my masthead rig I should just have to add the antenna & put a tape measure over the side at the bow to my "I".
eje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-07-2020, 14:54   #15
Registered User
 
AA3JY's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kimberton,Pa.
Boat: Cabo Rico 34
Posts: 527
Re: Okeechobee

[QUOTE=eje;3192576]It's a new boat, I'm not sure. The "I" is 46 ft[QUOTE]

Make and model?
AA3JY is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Status of Okeechobee Waterway? Entlie Other 3 28-08-2009 15:59
Okeechobee crossing starting May 9 Therapy Sailor Logs & Cruising Plans 0 22-03-2009 11:39
Lake Okeechobee Question Bear Essentials Atlantic & the Caribbean 2 27-01-2008 08:58
Crossing of the okeechobee waterway Latitude9.5 Atlantic & the Caribbean 3 04-07-2006 08:02
FL Canals? Okeechobee? ssullivan Atlantic & the Caribbean 9 02-02-2006 06:19

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 22:02.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.