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Old 31-01-2021, 10:30   #1
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Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

My understanding is that both Cuba and Mexico require insurance from their own country/ agents. It sounds to me like more or less just an added fee. Anyone know what the fees/policies cost ? I am assuming this is a liability policy only.
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Old 31-01-2021, 10:48   #2
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

Reference: https://www.boatus.com/products-and-...ility-coverage


You will need a cruising extension when taking your boat to Mexican waters. However, this extension will only cover the physical damage to your boat. Also, all boats are required under Mexican Law to have liability insurance issued through a Mexican Insurance Company. Without it, you could face serious consequences including fines, impoundment and/or imprisonment.

In the event of an auto or boating accident, Mexican law requires proof of financial responsibility, which is typically done by showing authorities your insurance policy. Without proof of coverage, your boat and vehicle can be impounded until you prove you weren't at fault. Both the Liability and Auto coverage must be issued by a Mexican insurance provider.

Boating in Mexico requires three types of insurance:

Hull Coverage (your boat insurance policy w/cruising area extension)
Liability Coverage (issued by a Mexican Insurance provider)
Automobile Liability Coverage if trailering your boat on land (issued by a Mexican Insurance provider)
BoatUS has partnered with a Mexican insurer who can provide both boat and auto liability coverage. Visit our Mexican insurance partner's website and the quote page for your auto. If you would like a liability boat quote please call them at 844-273-5527.

For hull coverage, your BoatUS or GEICO boat insurance policy requires a cruising area extension when boating in Mexico. You can obtain this extension over the phone by calling BoatUS Policy Services at 800-283-2883.

As to Cuba travel. It appears you are an American. It is illegal under the Export Administration Rules for you to travel to Cuba or for you to bring your yacht or private airplane to Cuba. Thus insurance is rather irrelevant.
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Old 31-01-2021, 11:00   #3
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

Thanks for the reply Montanan, apparently there are a number of outlaw type people ( like me) who are or wish to sail Cuban waters. They are doing it somehow, I just would like to know how. Some can be seen on YouTube. I am thinking the new administration is going to be lifting many of the current restrictions, as they should. Cuba is an opportunity waiting to happen.
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Old 31-01-2021, 11:55   #4
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

Perhaps the Biden Administration will take a different approach as to relationships with Cuba, but until then the laws are the laws and US policy is what it is. The Cuban American community remains of mixed opinion in this regard and they are certainly the one's feeling the brunt of the recently tightened rules, particularly as to curtailing visitations and funds transfers to financially aid their Cuban relatives. In the meantime there are plenty of other places to travel to, albeit with Covid protocols and issues associated with the pandemic; it has been a long time since America owned Cuba having acquired it from Spain. As to Youtubing or other social media posting of one's voyages to Cuba, well that is a rather dumb thing to do as it is documenting an entry to a country without a Federal license permitting such. As to how they do it. Simple they just go and break the laws and risk the consequences thereof. Best to just pass by Cuba until the law allows for such destination by Americans citizens and permanent residents.

Americans could not obtain insurance for their yachts or private airplanes until 2017, but I suspect that such underwriting has now been curtailed under the recently tightened EAR. Now the US Treasury probably prohibits such financial supportive contracts. Reference an article from 2017: https://www.sailmagazine.com/cruisin...ce-cuba-travel

Easy enough to find out if underwriters will presently issue a policy for a yacht owned by an American, just call the insurance companies.
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Old 31-01-2021, 11:55   #5
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

We sailed to Cuba during the brief time the legal window was open. We had no coverage on our US policy, and no requirement to buy a Cuban policy while we were there. Hopefully, Cuba sailing will change soon- I can’t say enough about it. Other US yachties bought short term insurance from British underwriters. Worth looking in to when it re-opens. It is still legal to fly to Cuba- we did last year.
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Old 31-01-2021, 12:04   #6
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

FYI: Insurance for Cuba - Without a general or specific license authorizing an incident of activity with Cuba, no insurance service is allowed.

OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL - SANCTIONS PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

https://home.treasury.gov/policy-iss...tions/faqs/777


CUBA SANCTIONS
777. May persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction provide certain insurance-related services (such as cargo or hull insurance, or reinsurance) to persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction who are engaging in authorized activity in Cuba?

Answer:

Where the provision of insurance-related services is directly incident to activity authorized by general or specific license, then the provision of such services is authorized as well. For example, § 515.566 of the CACR authorizes travel and travel-related transactions directly incident to engaging in religious activities in Cuba. The provision of health insurance-, life insurance-, and travel insurance-related services to authorized travelers traveling to Cuba pursuant to § 515.566 would be authorized. For additional information, see Note 2 to 31 CFR § 515.560. As an additional example, the provision of insurance to a person subject to U.S. jurisdiction that is incident to convening authorized athletic competitions, as defined in 31 CFR § 515.567(a), would also be authorized.

Additionally, § 515.533 of the CACR authorizes transactions ordinarily incident to the exportation or reexportation to Cuba of certain goods licensed or otherwise authorized by the Department of Commerce. Transactions directly incident to the exportation or reexportation of such goods, such as the provision of cargo insurance for the transportation of the goods, are authorized by § 515.533. For additional information, see Note 1 to paragraph (a) of 31 CFR § 515.533.

Persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction, however, are prohibited from engaging in reinsurance arrangements where the underlying activity is not authorized by the CACR. For example, a person subject to U.S. jurisdiction would be prohibited from participating in a reinsurance arrangement that involved coverage for a foreign company that provides investment opportunities in Cuban state- owned businesses.


Date Released
September 23, 2020
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Old 31-01-2021, 12:17   #7
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

FYI:

US Code of Federal Regulations
Title 33 - Navigation and Navigable Waters
Volume: 1
Date: 2018-07-01
Original Date: 2018-07-01

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/...l1-part107.xml

Title: PART 107 - NATIONAL VESSEL AND FACILITY CONTROL MEASURES AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS
Context: Title 33 - Navigation and Navigable Waters. CHAPTER I - COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY. SUBCHAPTER H - MARITIME SECURITY.
Pt. 107
PART 107—NATIONAL VESSEL AND FACILITY CONTROL MEASURES AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS
Subpart A [Reserved]
Subpart B—Unauthorized Entry Into Cuban Territorial Waters
Sec.
107.200
Definitions.
107.205
Purpose and delegation.
107.210
Applicability.
107.215
Regulations.
107.220
Permits.
107.225
Appeals.
107.230
Enforcement.
107.240
Continuation.
Authority:
50 U.S.C. 191, 192, 194, 195; 14 U.S.C. 141; Presidential Proclamation 6867, 61 FR 8843, 3 CFR, 1996 Comp., p. 8; Presidential Proclamation 7757, 69 FR 9515 (March 1, 2004); Secretary of Homeland Security Order 2004-001; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1; and 33 CFR 1.05-1.
Source:
Order 2004-001, 69 FR 41372, July 8, 2004, unless otherwise noted.
Subpart A [Reserved]

Subpart B—Unauthorized Entry Into Cuban Territorial Waters

§ 107.200 Definitions.
Unless otherwise specified, as used in this subpart:
Auxiliary vessel includes every description of watercraft or other artificial contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of transportation on water attached to, or embarked in, another vessel to which this subpart applies.
Cuban territorial waters means the territorial sea and internal waters of Cuba determined in accordance with international law.
Owner, agent, master, officer, or person in charge means the persons or entities that maintain operational control over any vessel subject to the requirements of this subpart.
U.S. territorial waters has the same meaning as provided in 50 U.S.C. 195.
Vessel includes every description of watercraft or other artificial contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of transportation on water, including auxiliary vessels.
Vessel of the United States means—
(1) A vessel documented under chapter 121 of title 46 or a vessel numbered as provided in chapter 123 of that title;
(2) A vessel owned in whole or part by—
(i) The United States or a territory, commonwealth, or possession of the United States;
(ii) A State or political subdivision thereof;
(iii) a citizen or national of the United States; or
(iv) A corporation, partnership, association, trust, joint venture, limited liability company, limited liability partnership, or any other legal entity, created and authorized to own vessels under the laws of the United States or any State, the District of Columbia, or any territory, commonwealth, or possession of the United States; unless the vessel has been granted the nationality of a foreign nation in accordance with article 5 of the 1958 Convention on the High Seas and a claim of nationality or registry for the vessel is made by the master or individual in charge at the time of the enforcement action by an officer or employee of the United States authorized to enforce applicable provisions of United States law;
(3) A vessel that was once documented under the laws of the United States and, in violation of the laws of the United States, was either sold to a person not a citizen of the United States or placed under foreign registry or a foreign flag, whether or not the vessel has been granted the nationality of a foreign nation;
(4) A vessel without nationality as defined in 46 U.S.C. Appendix 1903(c)(2)-(3); or
(5) A vessel assimilated to a vessel without nationality, in accordance with paragraph (2) of article 6 of the 1958 Convention on the High Seas.
§ 107.205Purpose and delegation.
The purpose of this subpart is to implement Presidential Proclamation 7757, and Secretary of Homeland Security Order 2004-001. All powers and authorities granted to officers of the Coast Guard by this subpart may be delegated to other officers and agents of the Coast Guard unless otherwise prohibited by law.

§ 107.210 Applicability.
(a) This subpart applies to:
(1) Vessels of the United States less than 100 meters (328 feet) in length (and all associated auxiliary vessels) and the owners, agents, masters, officers, persons in charge, and members of the crew of such vessels, that depart U.S. territorial waters and thereafter enter Cuban territorial waters, regardless of whether such entry is made after an intervening entry into, passage through, or departure from any other foreign territory or territorial waters;
(2) Vessels of the United States less than 100 meters (328 feet) in length (and all associated auxiliary vessels) and the owners, agents, masters, officers, persons in charge, and members of the crew of such vessels that are located at or get underway from a berth, pier, mooring, or anchorage in U.S. territorial waters, or depart U.S. territorial waters with the intent to enter Cuban territorial waters; and
(3) Any person who knowingly fails to comply with this subpart or order given under this subpart, or knowingly obstructs or interferes with the exercise of any power conferred by this subpart.
(b) This subpart does not apply to: Foreign vessels, as defined by 46 U.S.C. 2101(12), public vessels, as defined by 46 U.S.C. 2101(24) operated for non-commercial purposes, or vessels of the United States entering Cuban territorial waters under force majeure.

§ 107.215 Regulations.
(a) Each person or vessel to which this subpart applies may not get underway or depart from U.S. territorial waters without a written permit from the Commander, Seventh Coast Guard District, or the District Commander's designee. Permits may be obtained pursuant to the process established in § 107.220. The owner, agent, master, or person in charge of the vessel must maintain the written permit for the vessel on board the vessel.
(b) Each person or vessel to which this subpart applies must obey any oral or written order issued by a Coast Guard Area or District Commander, or their designees, who may issue oral or written orders to control the anchorage or movement of such vessels and persons. Designees include Captains of the Port, and commissioned, warrant and petty officers of the Coast Guard.
(c) No person or vessel to which this subpart applies may obstruct or interfere with the exercise of any power conferred by this subpart.
(d) Coast Guard commissioned, warrant and petty officers may go or remain on board a vessel subject to this subpart, may place guards on the subject vessel, may remove all persons not specifically authorized by the Coast Guard to go or remain on board the subject vessel, and may take full or partial possession or control of any such vessel or part thereof, or person on board. Such actions to be taken are in the discretion of the Coast Guard Area or District Commander, or their designees, as deemed necessary to ensure compliance with this subpart and any order given pursuant thereto.
(e) Where there is a reasonable, articulable basis to believe a vessel to which this subpart applies intends to enter Cuban territorial waters, any Coast Guard commissioned, warrant, or petty officer may require the owners, agents, masters, officers, or persons in charge, or any member of the crew of any such vessel to provide verbal assurance that the vessel will not enter Cuban territorial waters as a condition for a vessel to get underway from a berth, pier, mooring, or anchorage in U.S. territorial waters, or to depart from U.S. territorial waters. A Coast Guard commissioned, warrant, or petty officer may require the owners, agents, masters, officers, or persons in charge of the vessel to identify all persons on board the vessel and provide verbal assurances that all persons on board have received actual notice of these regulations. The failure of an owner, agent, master, officer, or person in charge, or any member of the crew of any vessel (including all auxiliary vessels) to which this subpart applies to provide requested verbal assurances shall not be used as the sole basis for seizing the vessel for forfeiture under this subpart.
(f) The provisions of this subpart are in addition to any powers conferred by law upon Coast Guard commissioned, warrant, or petty officers, and not in limitation of any powers conferred by law or regulation upon such officers, or any other officers of the United States.

§ 107.220 Permits.
(a) Applications for a permit may be obtained by writing or calling the Chief of Response at Commander, Seventh Coast Guard District (dr), 909 SE First Avenue, Miami, FL 33131, telephone (305) 415-6800, or by such other means as the District Commander may make available to the public. The completed application may be returned via regular mail or facsimile to the Chief of Response at Commander, Seventh Coast Guard District (dr), 909 SE First Avenue, Miami, FL 33131, facsimile (305) 415-6809, or by other means prescribed by the District Commander for the convenience of the applicant.
(b) All applications must be written in English and legible.
(c) The information and documentation in this paragraph must be provided with the application in order for it to be complete and considered by the Coast Guard:
(1) The name, address, and telephone number of the applicant;
(2) A copy of the valid vessel registration;
(3) A copy of a valid and applicable license issued to the applicant by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security, pursuant to the Export Administration Regulations, 15 CFR chapter VII, subchapter C, parts 730-774 for the export of the vessel to Cuba; and
(4) A copy of a valid and applicable specific license issued by the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), pursuant to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations, 31 CFR part 515, authorizing the applicant's travel-related transactions in Cuba. Applicants who do not require such an OFAC specific license shall make a written certification to that effect identifying which OFAC general license applies or explaining why no OFAC license is required.
(d) Such applications must provide the documentation required by § 107.220(c) for each person to which this subpart applies on board the particular vessel.
(e) Upon receiving an application for a permit, the Seventh Coast Guard District Commander (dr) has ten (10) calendar days from the receipt of the application to decide whether the application is complete and, if so, whether a permit will be issued or denied. Applicants will be notified in writing of the decision to issue or deny a permit. Incomplete applications will be returned to the applicant, along with the reasons why such application was deemed incomplete.
[Order 2004-001, 69 FR 41372, July 8, 2004, as amended by USCG-2011-0257, 76 FR 31833, June 2, 2011]

§ 107.225 Appeals.
(a) Upon written notification by the Coast Guard that an application has been denied, the applicant may request the Seventh Coast Guard District Commander to reconsider. The request to reconsider must be in writing, must be made within five (5) business days from the date of receipt of the initial denial, and must contain complete supporting documentation and evidence which the applicant wishes to have considered. Requests for reconsideration must be mailed to Commander, Seventh Coast Guard District (d), 909 SE First Avenue, Miami, FL 33131.
(b) Upon receipt of the request to reconsider, the Seventh Coast Guard District Commander may direct a representative to gather and submit documentation or other evidence, which, in the judgment of the Seventh District Commander, would be necessary or helpful to a resolution of the request. If gathered and submitted, a copy of this documentation and evidence shall be made available to the applicant. The applicant shall be afforded five (5) business days from the date of receipt of documentation and evidence gathered by the Seventh Coast Guard District Commander's representative to submit rebuttal materials. On or before the fifteenth (15th) calendar day following submission of all materials, the Seventh Coast Guard District Commander shall issue a ruling, in writing, on the request to reconsider. The ruling may reverse the initial denial, or, if the denial is upheld, must contain the specific basis for denial of the application upon reconsideration.
(c) The Seventh Coast Guard District Commander's denial of a request for reconsideration taken under paragraph (b) of this section constitutes final agency action.

§ 107.230 Enforcement.
(a) Unauthorized departure or entry, or both. (1) Vessels and persons to whom this subpart applies, as described in § 107.210(a)(1), that do not comply with § 107.215(a), or any order issued pursuant to this subpart may be subject to a civil penalty of not more than $25,000 for each day of violation.
(2) Vessels and persons to whom § 107.230(a)(1) applies shall be held to a standard of strict liability for any entry into Cuban territorial waters without a permit or for failure to maintain the permit for the vessel on board the vessel as required under this subpart, except that strict liability will not be imposed if the failure to obtain or carry a permit results primarily from an act of war, force majeure, or the negligence of the United States.
(b) Knowing failure to comply. Any person to whom this subpart applies as described in §§ 107.210(a)(2) or (a)(3) who knowingly fails to comply with this subpart or order given under this subpart, or knowingly obstructs or interferes with the exercise of any power conferred by this subpart may be subject to:
(1) Imprisonment for not more than 10 years;
(2) A monetary penalty of not more than $10,000;
(3) Seizure and forfeiture of the vessel; and
(4) A civil penalty of not more than $25,000 for each day of violation.
(c) False Statements. Violation of 18 U.S.C. 1001 may result in imprisonment for not more than five years or a fine, or both.
(d) Other enforcement. The civil penalties provided for in this subpart are separate from and in addition to any enforcement action that any other agency may seek for violations of the statutes and regulations administered by such agencies.


§ 107.240 Continuation.
This subpart will continue to be enforced so long as the national emergency with respect to Cuba, and the emergency authority relating to the regulation of the anchorage and movement of vessels declared in Proclamation 6867, and expanded in scope by Proclamation 7757, continues.

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Old 31-01-2021, 12:38   #8
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

Per Noonsite - Cuba

Cuba does not ask for an insurance certificate. If you are concerned about boat loss/damage etc, that is a different issue and you will have to make sure that your company can process claims in Cuba.
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Old 31-01-2021, 13:13   #9
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

FYI:

Office of Foreign Asset Control OFAC FAQs:

714. May an individual authorized traveler take a commercial passenger ferry or use his or her private boat to travel to Cuba?
The export or reexport to Cuba of items subject to the EAR, including commercial vessels used to provide carrier services and private vessels, requires separate authorization from the Department of Commerce. See 31 CFR § 515.533. For a complete description of Bureau of Industry and Security, Department of Commerce BIS’s regulatory requirements, see BIS’s Cuba webpage. https://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/po...tinations/cuba

While 31 CFR § 515.572 generally authorizes the provision of carrier services, OFAC amended its regulations effective June 5, 2019 to highlight the separate BIS requirements. For a complete description of what the OFAC general license authorizes and the restrictions that apply, see 31 CFR § 515.572.

09/06/2019

715. Are U.S. vessels, including commercial passenger ferries or private boats, permitted to carry passengers to or from Cuba?
The export or reexport to Cuba of items subject to the EAR, including commercial vessels used to provide carrier services and private vessels, requires separate authorization from the Department of Commerce. See 31 CFR § 515.533. For a complete description of BIS’s regulatory requirements, see BIS’s Cuba webpage.

While 31 CFR § 515.572 generally authorizes the provision of carrier services, and 31 CFR § 515.572(a)(4) generally authorizes the provision of lodging services by persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction who are authorized to provide carrier services, OFAC amended its regulations effective June 5, 2019 to highlight the BIS requirements. For a complete description of what the OFAC general license authorizes and the restrictions that apply, see 31 CFR § 515.572.

09/06/2019


716. Are authorized U.S. travelers permitted to travel onboard vessels in Cuba to meet their transportation needs within Cuba?
Travel onboard a vessel in Cuba is permitted for authorized travel.

11/08/2017

Cuba

On October 21, 2019, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) amended the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) to support the President’s policy to hold the Cuban regime accountable for its repression of the Cuban people and its support of the Maduro regime in Venezuela. BIS established a general policy of denial for leases of aircraft to Cuban state-owned airlines; clarifed that aircraft and vessels are not eligible for the License Exception Aircraft and Vessels (AVS) if they are leased to or chartered by a national of Cuba; established a general 10-percent de minimis level for Cuba; and revised License Exception Support for the Cuban People (SCP) to make the Cuban government and communist party ineligible for certain donations, remove an authorization for promotional items that generally benefits the Cuban government, and clarify the scope of telecommunications items that the Cuban government may receive without a license.

The United States maintains a comprehensive embargo on trade with Cuba. The export and reexport to Cuba of items subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) require a BIS license unless authorized by a license exception specified in section 746.2(a)(1) of the EAR or exempted from license requirements in section 746.2(a)(2). The EAR sets forth licensing policy for exports and reexports that generally will be approved, exports and reexports that will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, and exports and reexports that will generally be denied.


Aircraft and Vessels

Flying an aircraft or sailing a vessel to Cuba, even temporarily, constitutes an export or reexport to Cuba. If the aircraft or vessel is subject to the EAR, then BIS authorization is required, either through a license or license exception, to fly/sail to Cuba. Commercial aircraft and cargo vessels on temporary sojourn to Cuba may be eligible for License Exception Aircraft, Vessels, and Spacecraft (AVS) (Section 740.15 of the EAR). Note that all corresponding requirements and criteria must be met in order to be eligible for License Exception AVS.

A BIS license is required for the temporary sojourn to Cuba of non-commercial aircraft and non-cargo vessels, and license applications for those aircraft and vessels are subject to a general policy of denial.

Other U.S. Government Agencies

Please be aware that other U.S. Government agencies administer regulations that could also impact your export or reexport transaction. For example, the Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) maintains certain Cuba-related sanctions. Exporters and reexporters are responsible for complying with all applicable regulatory requirements.


Foreign-Made Items

Both BIS and OFAC administer Cuba sanctions pursuant to the EAR and the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR) (31 C.F.R. Part 515), respectively. Most export or reexport transactions require general or specific authorizations from both BIS and OFAC. OFAC has issued a general license authorizing all transactions ordinarily incident to the exportation of items from the United States, or the reexportation of 100 percent U.S.-origin items from a third country, to any person in Cuba, provided that the exportation is licensed or otherwise authorized by BIS. See 31 C.F.R. § 515.533. Accordingly, for those BIS-licensed exports or reexports, further OFAC authorization generally is not needed. However, in some cases, a specific license from OFAC may be required in connection with BIS-authorized exports or reexports. For example, even if BIS has authorized the reexport of items that are not 100 percent U.S.-origin to Cuba, persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction would also require a specific license from OFAC to reexport the items, and OFAC’s consideration of applications for such licenses may be subject to statutory restrictions. See 31 C.F.R. § 515.559.


Questions

For questions specific to Cuba, contact the Foreign Policy Division at 202-482-4252.
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Old 01-02-2021, 08:57   #10
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

I also sailed to Cuba during the brief time it was allowed. I couldn't for the life of me, find an insurance company that would provide insurance for the boat and liability. We did have to buy HEALTH insurance when checking in as a requirement.

It was a great trip and hope to do it again once travel opens up (if it opens up). It was a great experience and had no issues as we played it by the book ensuring we followed all rules and regulations.

I was nervous not having insurance, though...
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Old 01-02-2021, 09:03   #11
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Perfessor View Post
I also sailed to Cuba during the brief time it was allowed. I couldn't for the life of me, find an insurance company that would provide insurance for the boat and liability. We did have to buy HEALTH insurance when checking in as a requirement.

It was a great trip and hope to do it again once travel opens up (if it opens up). It was a great experience and had no issues as we played it by the book ensuring we followed all rules and regulations.

I was nervous not having insurance, though...
So in another words Cuba did not require you to have insurance ? Thanks.
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Old 01-02-2021, 09:41   #12
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

Can't comment on Cuba but for myself and many, many of my fellow Canadians we obtain the required insurance for our Canadian-registered boats through Lloyd's of London as the insurer. It is my understanding that Lloyd's insurance will satisfy the Mexican insurance requirement but that it will NOT accept insurance from an American insurer (can't say why ). I've been 'getting by' with Lloyd's coverage for the last 15+ years and haven't had any problems nor have I ever heard of any other Canadian boats ever having a problem re the identity of the insurer.


Also, (although I have not tested it yet), it is also my understanding that it is only liability insurance coverage that is required. I find it hard to believe that the Mexican government cares whether or not I wish to insure my own monetary loss should I choose to not insure my own possessions --ie. my boat


As an aside, last year my insurance premiums (and those of some others that I know of) increased considerably ----- did anybody else experience much larger insurance renewal premiums?



(As a further aside, I was able to negotiate a significant discount on these increased premiums on the basis that during the insurance term the boat would remain on the hard and not be cruising --- because, of course, I would not be getting to Mexico because of Covid risks, non-coverage of Covid claims by my health insurer and the interruption and suspension of airflights)
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Old 01-02-2021, 09:56   #13
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

Getting back to the#2 post in this thread, Mexico doesn't require hull insurance. You may opt to insure your boat but only liability insurance is required. We stopped our hull insurance 7 years ago and not had any problems with marinas or port captains. Liability insurance is required and around $400 USD
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Old 01-02-2021, 12:21   #14
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomodore View Post
Getting back to the#2 post in this thread, Mexico doesn't require hull insurance. You may opt to insure your boat but only liability insurance is required. We stopped our hull insurance 7 years ago and not had any problems with marinas or port captains. Liability insurance is required and around $400 USD
Ah, now we are getting close to the answers I seek. The $400 insurance you speak of, is that through a Mexican agency or an American insurance group ? If it is Mexican where and how did you buy it ? Thanks.
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Old 01-02-2021, 12:33   #15
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Re: Insurance for Mexico and Cuba

Montanan, it sure appears you play it by the book. Not that it’s bad but I am 76 years old coming this Friday and one thing I’ve noticed is the older you get the less you care about bureaucratic rules, especially rules concerning Cuba. I was there last year, not following American rules, and would love to sail it’s waters. We’ve been in a pissing contest with Cuba for close to 70 years and I’m sick to death of it. As I originally stated, I’m definitely an outlaw.
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