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Old 27-12-2019, 07:01   #76
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

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Could be us in a months time.
allow a week or so to do all the paper work when checking in and out the EU then,customs ,quarentine and immigration inspections returning to uk
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Old 29-12-2019, 12:42   #77
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

Oh well, back to using Form C1331, wonder if we still have those little yellow boxes around each little harbour to post the form in
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Old 10-01-2020, 04:00   #78
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

Having brushed up on some of the guidance being issued by the EU in relation to EU/UK citizenship / residency post-Brexit, my take is as follows:
After 31st Jan 2020 UK passport holders resident in the UK will cease to be EU resident but rights of free movement within the EU will remain until end Dec 2020. I assume this means that if I have a non-VAT paid boat that I will be able to visit EU countries under the 18mos rule and not suffer from Schengen restrictions at least until the end of 2020. Anyone else have a view on this ?
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Old 10-01-2020, 04:35   #79
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

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Originally Posted by Hartings View Post
Having brushed up on some of the guidance being issued by the EU in relation to EU/UK citizenship / residency post-Brexit, my take is as follows:
After 31st Jan 2020 UK passport holders resident in the UK will cease to be EU resident but rights of free movement within the EU will remain until end Dec 2020. I assume this means that if I have a non-VAT paid boat that I will be able to visit EU countries under the 18mos rule and not suffer from Schengen restrictions at least until the end of 2020. Anyone else have a view on this ?
From what I have read and understand you have the bulk of it correct. During the "transition" period we should still have the usual rights of an EU Resident/Citizen, ie no limit due to the Schengen rules.

The Cruising Association have confirmed that despite the transition period vessels in the UK on the date of exit (31st Jan now) will instantly lose EU VAT Paid status. Technically this actually includes EU flagged vessels too but I suspect that will be blind-eyed by the relevant authorities.

Once we exit the EU rules on dyed diesel won't apply in the UK so that might solve the current problem facing a lot of marinas and ports but it will still apply when sailing over to EU so I suspect the Belgians in particular will be very harsh on that. Think south coast marinas and ports will have to bring in white diesel eventually as EU boats will not want dyed diesel in their tanks ever.

Personally I think the transition period will be longer than the end of 2020 as the trade talks are almost certainly going to take longer than 10 months. But a deal in principle will almost certainly exist by Dec 2020 so wait and see what happens.
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Old 10-01-2020, 09:27   #80
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

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Originally Posted by Hartings View Post
Having brushed up on some of the guidance being issued by the EU in relation to EU/UK citizenship / residency post-Brexit, my take is as follows:
After 31st Jan 2020 UK passport holders resident in the UK will cease to be EU resident but rights of free movement within the EU will remain until end Dec 2020. I assume this means that if I have a non-VAT paid boat that I will be able to visit EU countries under the 18mos rule and not suffer from Schengen restrictions at least until the end of 2020. Anyone else have a view on this ?
Perhaps this will be of assistance to you all. Official specific guidance issued per the EUROPEAN TRAVEL INFORMATION AND AUTHORIZATION SYSTEM [ETIAS]

https://www.etiasvisa.com/etias-news...ct-uk-citizens


"The UK is set to leave the EU on January 31st, 2020 but the two parties have not been able to agree on a deal. A no-deal Brexit remains the default position if the two sides cannot reach an agreement in time for the new "flextension" deadline.

UK citizens have enjoyed freedom of movement in Europe ever since the UK joined the EU in 1973 (known then as the European Economic Area), but will this change after Brexit?

UK citizens will not need to apply for a Schengen Visa like many other nationalities. On February 1, 2019, the European Council said: “EU ambassadors today agreed that, following Brexit, UK citizens coming to the Schengen area for a short stay (90 days in any 180 days) should be granted visa-free travel.”

However, from 2021, UK citizens will not be able to enter the Schengen Area with only their passports. The EU Commission has confirmed that UK citizens will need to pay a fee to visit Europe and will need to complete the online ETIAS application form before setting off.

ETIAS (European Travel Information and Authorisation System) is the name given to the new travel authorization system which will be a requirement for British citizens and 60 other nationalities who can currently visit Europe visa-free. ETIAS will be a visa-waiver, meaning it will save travelers the hassle of obtaining conventional Schengen visas.

However, the implementation of the law is conditional. Members of parliament also said this arrangement is conditional upon the UK granting EU nationals the same benefits. This means British travelers will only be visa-exempt as long as EU citizens can enter the UK without a visa.

While the UK is still a member of the EU, UK citizens traveling to Europe only need their passport to enter the other member countries. However, this will change after Brexit and, from 2021, ETIAS for British citizens will be a requirement.


The ETIAS visa waiver for Europe is being developed to improve the security and border control of Europe following concerns over terrorism and immigration. It will be similar to both the US (ESTA) and Canadian (eTA) models which have already been implemented.

When people apply for ETIAS, they will be screened using a number of European security databases including Interpol and Europol. Anyone who poses a security threat will be identified and prevented from reaching European soil.

TRAVELING TO EUROPE FROM THE UK: HOW DOES IT WORK NOW?
At the moment, there is no need for a Europe visa waiver for British citizens. UK citizens have EU passports which means they can move freely and even work in other countries in the region. They only need to show their UK passport to be able to enter any EU country.

The free movement of people is one of the EU’s key principles. Once the UK is no longer a part of the political union, British people will no longer be able to move around the continent as freely as before.

The current Brexit deadline is January 31 2020. At present the proposed Withdrawal agreement struck between Prime Minister Boris Johnson and the EU still has to be approved by parliament. If this does not happen in time for the February 1st 2020 deadline, the UK will either leave without a deal or another deadline extension will be agreed.

There is a lot of uncertainty surrounding the prospect of a no-deal Brexit but according to the UK Government and the EU, British travelers will be able to travel to the Schengen Area with only their passports until ETIAS is implemented.

ETIAS and Brexit are coincidental: ETIAS is not a consequence of Brexit. ETIAS is being introduced to improve the security of the region and the safety of its citizens. European Parliament representatives expressed the need for this system. “By knowing who is coming to the EU before they even arrive at the border, we will be better able to stop those who may pose a threat to our citizens.”

WHAT WILL ETIAS MEAN FOR THE UK?
After ETIAS comes into effect, British citizens visiting Europe will have to apply online for an ETIAS visa waiver before departing. The ETIAS visa waiver for UK citizens will be valid for 3-year periods and will allow unlimited entries into the region.

Although British people will need to apply for ETIAS, they will not need to apply for a visa like many other countries. The 61 nationalities which are currently visa-exempt, including the UK, will remain visa-exempt but will need an ETIAS visa waiver.

The ETIAS application should not take longer than 10 minutes to complete and the process will be straightforward. Applicants will have to fill out a short form with personal information, details of their passport and answer some security questions. They will then have to pay a fee.

The confirmed travel authorization should be available to the applicant within a few minutes and the whole process is likely to take a total of 15 minutes although this may vary as the final details have yet to be clarified.

Obtaining an ETIAS visa waiver to travel to Europe will not be optional. It will be highly regulated. Airlines, ferry firms, train operators or coach companies will check that travelers have a valid ETIAS visa waiver before departure. All operators will be required to verify, “that travelers are in possession of a valid travel authorization” Without a valid ETIAS, the traveler will not be able to board their transport to Europe.

If a British person travels to a Schengen country without an ETIAS visa waiver, they will not be allowed to enter the country. The EU said: “at the request of the authorities competent to carry out the border checks, the carriers shall be obliged to return the third country nationals to the third country from which they were transported or to the third country which issues the travel document.”

Claude Moraes, rapporteur for the most recent proposal waiting for approval, said: “With the Brexit clock ticking, it is important to press ahead with this measure exempting British citizens from a visa requirement when travelling to the EU. This will go some way to clarifying EU visa policy after Brexit."

VISA-FREE DEAL CONDITIONAL ON UK RECIPROCITY
The European Commission said British citizens will not need visas to visit the European Union for short-term stays. However, this policy recommendation is dependent on the UK continuing to offer reciprocal visa-free access to European Union citizens.

On February 1, 2019, the European Council stated: “According to EU rules, visa exemption is granted on condition of reciprocity. The government of the United Kingdom has stated that it does not intend to require a visa from EU citizens travelling to the UK for short stays".

“In the event that the United Kingdom introduces a visa requirement for nationals of at least one member state in the future, the existing reciprocity mechanism would apply and the three institutions and the member states would commit to act without delay in applying the mechanism” they said.

This means that the current proposals could change depending on the position of the UK’s position regarding the rights of EU nationals. The UK Government has said that Brexit will end freedom of movement but whether this is just tough rhetoric or a realistic policy remains to be seen."
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Old 10-01-2020, 10:08   #81
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

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Originally Posted by Hartings View Post
Having brushed up on some of the guidance being issued by the EU in relation to EU/UK citizenship / residency post-Brexit, my take is as follows:
After 31st Jan 2020 UK passport holders resident in the UK will cease to be EU resident but rights of free movement within the EU will remain until end Dec 2020. I assume this means that if I have a non-VAT paid boat that I will be able to visit EU countries under the 18mos rule and not suffer from Schengen restrictions at least until the end of 2020. Anyone else have a view on this ?
Additional guidance from Her Majesty's government, especially as to the imposition of Schengen restrictions to UK citizens post Brexit.

You may desire to sign up for email alerts and updates issued directly from the UK government.

Reference link: https://www.gov.uk/visit-europe-brexit


"The UK is leaving the EU. This page tells you how to prepare for Brexit and will be updated if anything changes.:

Travel to the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein will change if the UK leaves the EU with no deal.

Things you may need to do before you go include:

check your passport

get travel insurance that covers your healthcare

check you have the right driving documents

organise pet travel - contact your vet at least 4 months before you go

There are more things to do if you’re travelling for business. For example, going to meetings and conferences, providing services (even with a charity), and touring art or music. Reference website above for link to individual country visa requirements for business related travel.


Passports: check if you need to renew
You may need to renew your British passport earlier if you’re travelling after Brexit.

On the day you travel, you’ll need your passport to both:

have at least 6 months left
be less than 10 years old (even if it has 6 months or more left)
If you do not renew it, you may not be able to travel to most EU countries and Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.

You can use a tool to check whether your passport is valid for the country you’re visiting. See website referenced above for link to this tool.

It usually takes 3 weeks if you need to renew your passport. There’s a premium service if you need it sooner.

These rules do not apply to travel to Ireland. You can continue to use your passport as long as it’s valid for the length of your stay.
Healthcare: check you’re covered
You should always get appropriate travel insurance with healthcare cover before you go abroad.

After Brexit your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) card may not be valid.

It’s particularly important you get travel insurance with the right cover if you have a pre-existing medical condition. This is because the EHIC scheme covers pre-existing conditions, while many travel insurance policies do not.

Driving: you may need extra documents
You’ll need some extra documents after Brexit.

You’ll need an international driving permit (IDP) to drive in some countries. Check if you need an IDP.

If you’re taking your own vehicle, you’ll also need:

a ‘green card’ - allow 1 month to get this from your vehicle insurance company
a GB sticker

Entering other countries
Visas for short trips: you will not need one if you’re a tourist

If you’re a tourist, you will not need a visa for short trips to EU countries, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland. You’ll be able to stay for up to 90 days in any 180-day period.

You may need a visa or permit to stay for longer, to work or study, or for business travel.


Check each country’s travel advice page for information on how to get a visa or permit. Again link is provided at the above referenced webpage.

Travel to Ireland will not change after Brexit. You’ll also be able to work in Ireland in the same way as before.
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Old 14-01-2020, 11:46   #82
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

UK is leaving with a deal and you can ignore all guidance about what happens if there is no deal.
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Old 14-01-2020, 12:07   #83
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

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UK is leaving with a deal and you can ignore all guidance about what happens if there is no deal.
You know something the rest of us don't?

There is NO DEAL at present. All that has been agreed is the UK is leaving the EU on 31st January at which point we enter into negotiations over the future trading position between UK and EU and a transition period until 31st December 2020 during which time the status quo exists where UK is still a member of the Single Market and Customs Agreement, Free Movement still applies and UK citizens are not subject to Schengen limits.

If a deal can not be agreed between UK and EU and a further transition period is not agreed by 31st Dec 2020 then UK will leave with NO DEAL and the UK will be a 3rd nation country with no customs deal, no free movement and UK citizens will be subject to the 90 days in 180 Schengen limitation.
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Old 16-01-2020, 04:07   #84
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

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You know something the rest of us don't?
A little in that the Civil Servants 'no deal team' put together at short notice have been stood down and returned to their parent departments.


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Old 16-01-2020, 14:14   #85
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

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Originally Posted by kas_1611 View Post
You know something the rest of us don't?

There is NO DEAL at present. All that has been agreed is the UK is leaving the EU on 31st January at which point we enter into negotiations over the future trading position between UK and EU and a transition period until 31st December 2020 during which time the status quo exists where UK is still a member of the Single Market and Customs Agreement, Free Movement still applies and UK citizens are not subject to Schengen limits.

If a deal can not be agreed between UK and EU and a further transition period is not agreed by 31st Dec 2020 then UK will leave with NO DEAL and the UK will be a 3rd nation country with no customs deal, no free movement and UK citizens will be subject to the 90 days in 180 Schengen limitation.
As per the public data linked in my post #80 above, I perceive that if the UK does Brexit on January 31, 2020 WITHOUT a deal then UK citizens will be able to visit the Schengen countries during the interim period of February 1 to December 31, 2020 utilizing just their passports without the need for a visa or a visa waiver but thence UK citizens will become subject to the short stay privilege limitations of 90 days in any 180 day period during the eleven month transition period of February 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020. Similarly, non-UK citizens from the Schengen countries would have reciprocal rights to visit the UK utilizing just their passports without need for a visa or visa waiver but would be similarly subject to the 90 / 180 day limit beginning on February 1, 2020.

This being January 16th, that leaves the UK with 15 days to conclude a deal with the EU, else it will be a No Deal Brexiting subject to the eleven month transition period, during which one would hope for negotiations to proceed to a conclusive trade arrangement and a conclusive movement arrangement [a Deal of some sort].
Beginning in 2021, as it stands currently [i.e., subject to rule changes due to negotiating alternate arrangements] UK citizens will not be able to travel to Schengen countries without the ETIAS visa waver and will continue to be subject to the 90 days in any 180 day short stay limit for tourists and will likely be required to have visas for business related travel and / or for extended stays. The 90 / 180 day limit being applicable starting on February 1, 2020 [sixteen days from now]. Ditto reciprocally for the non-UK citizens of the Schengen countries requiring a ETIAS visa waiver to visit the UK beginning in 2021 and the 90 / 180 short stay limitations.

So travel will not be business as usual beginning February 1, 2020.

What to do NOW. Be sure your passports do not expire within 6 months of your entry into a Schengen country else you may be held up from entry because your permit to pass is only as good as your "passing port" document is validly issued. Check your expiration dates and have your passports timely renewed so as to not become an issue. Also you should check you have the proper vehicle driving license documents and your pet travel arrangements, and also health insurance coverages, see post #81 above.

There is not a continuity of status quo after January 31, 2020, i.e., after Brexit occurs.
Things become more complex on February 1, 2020 for UK citizen travel to the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein will change if the UK leaves the EU with no deal as it appears likely to. Similarly for citizens of the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein if they travel to the UK. Or at least as to what remains of the UK after Brexit is settled, some parts of the United Kingdom [erhhh, the United Queendom, the UQ] may desire their Exiting from Britain and remaining in the EU.

Wishing the best for the UK and the EU.

Going a bit here:

When one leaves a union, one looses the benefits thereof, freedom of movement being one of the major potential attributes of a union. Here in the Union of States of America, citizens and properly documented aliens have freedom of movement within the 50 states and the District of Columbia. IMHO, it would be a real PITA if I needed to get a visa to stay for more than three months in a six month period in another State be that for business or pleasure purposes, or to get a visa waiver to be able to freely cross the 51 borders, or to even have a passport document of some sort. But then the USA was the first to BREXIT back in 1776 when travel was more arduous, less frequent and there was no border controls to speak of into the Americas. I don't know if there were border controls in the UK or in Europe back in those long ago days; my ancestors left European countries to come to the USA and none returned that I am aware of. Presently, I have the pleasure and privilege of living within the [opened for non-native settlement] native Indian reservation of the Confederated Salish tribes and the Kootenai tribe located here in the Last Best Place - Montana; here our native neighbors will likely ask you, if you say you take issue with freedom of immigration: "So when are you leaving?" All of us persons of Non-Native American heritages in my Native American neighbors' perspective being alien immigrants or of alien immigrant stock. Perspective by nature has more than one viewpoint. In discussions with friends, business associates and relatives debating immigration policy wherein some may express the desire to restrain immigration into the USA [especially as to immigration from south of our nation's border] I will ask: "So exactly just what part of America are the United States NOT a part of?" when they say, "I'm an American", implying oddly that particularly the natives south of the border are not also fellow Americans [and by derivative implication that the Canadians are not also fellow Americans]. Usually what is being implied, often xenophobically, is that they are of European descent or at best Euro-American descent, clearly they are not of true Native American stock. Interesting, I rarely see such similar attitudes of distinction or nationalistic privilege expressed or implied by persons of African-American or Asian-American heritage [or of Central or Southern American heritage]; such attitudes seemingly being rather limited in prevalence to being among persons of European heritage, a Euro characteristic; perhaps a legacy of continuing Euro-colonialism privilege perspectives.

On this land I call home, the Flathead Reservation, membership within a tribe is based on blood quantum and there is remaining but a very small group of full blood natives [about 125 persons] the rest are of the 8,000+ members are of "mixed-breed" ancestry. Some of the Full blood persons consider themselves as being the only "true" tribepersons and the mixed blood persons of non-true tribespersons. Such attitudes can be highly contentious and because there is a blood quantum established as of a certain date in time there are also "split families" wherein some children are members and others are not members depending on the date of birth and their blood quantum value compared to the blood quantum requirement at the time of birth. The blood quantum requirement presently being one quarter blood ancestry derived from one of the three tribes associated to Federally recognized membership of this reservation. There being many persons of mixed full blood native american stock [i.e., Indians], or of high quantum percentage but of various tribal affiliation such that they are not of a large enough blood quantum of a specific tribe so as to qualify as a member of a specific tribe. They may be truly Native American, being of 100 percent blood quantum of Native American stock, but may be of only minor blood quantum of any given tribe, say derived of ancestors of five or ten tribes, therefore Citizens of the USA, but not qualifying of membership of any tribe. Tribes can and do change the rules of that define a person as a "member" and the Federal government and the individual State government typically adjust and accord their laws to go along with the recognition basis of membership that a tribe [a tribe being a "dependent sovereign" nation status] has defined for their internal accord. On the reservation in which I reside, the tribes having defined a quarter blood quantum minimum for memberships, which means that one can be a "member" when one is mostly NOT of the specific heritage of the two Confederated Salish tribes or of the Kootenai tribe to which this land has been reserved by the Hellgate Treaty of 1865. There being debate as to the accepted degree of dilution of blood quantum in proscribing "membership" status. With fewer members in the "tribes" the allocation of proceeds of benefits of being a member are inherently larger because there are fewer persons to share the wealth and income with. But given that the tribal members often marry persons that are not members of the tribes, their progeny will have a dilution of their blood quantum and thus may fall below the request blood quantum percentage requirement and thus not be included in the tribal membership and therefore not receive the benefits and privileges according such membership. Demographic realities trend towards a dilution of blood quantum and thus of total count of membership and thus membership rules come up for renewed discussion because the tribal membership becomes more exclusionary than inclusionary. Of keen underlying issue is whether the Non-Members of the tribe, [i.e., the vast majority of citizens of the USA] will continue to recognize a tribe and respect the treaty with a tribe; or will the Non-Members of the tribe, recognize and accept the definition of what constitutes fulfilling a tribal membership, or a tribes change in their definition of what constitutes fulfilling a tribal membership. One needs to realize that in our Democracy, the majority of the persons that are excluded from being "of a tribe" are ultimately the persons that are needed to continue to accept the terms of a long ago entered treaty with a tribe in order for the tribe to retain its "dependent sovereign" status, privileges and responsibilities of such nation state. As I have stated to tribal elders and council members of issue is whether non-tribal member persons like myself will continue to recognize and respect that there is in fact a "tribe", [a distinct diversity of personship], as to how their fellow Americans will address and accord relations with such "tribe". If there isn't something tangible and outward as to perceiving a unique "tribal" being, then the recognition of the tribe or tribes becomes endangered. Just what the "IT" is that triggers Non-Members of the tribe to recognize "a tribe" makes for interesting and lively discussion. Be included in the "IT" of defining a tribe for Non-Members could be language, culture, beliefs / values, way of life, blood quantum, ethnic appearance, or other attributes or characteristics. I have found that the tribal elders are the ones that tend to most agree with me that the real world "IT" is not so much what the tribal persons agree to deciding whether a person is of their Native definition but rather the "IT" is what the Non-Members perceive defines a person of being of Native nature [e.g, a member of a defined category or class of personship]. I love having the privilege of sharing in the Native American diversity on this land we call home.

The USA's Constitution begins with the words: "WE THE PEOPLE of the United States in order to form a more perfect union . . . " Defining who WE THE PEOPLE are is of foundational issue of governance and sovereignty and becomes contentious as it is inherently inclusive and at the same time exclusionary. The UK and the EU from which the UK is Brexiting need to define who their "WE THE PEOPLE" are.

Notedly, as to Brexit, I have yet to see written a comprehensive declaration explaining the UK's [UQ's] reasons for desiring independence from the EU, that is to say something a kin to the Declaration of Independence of the USA which explicitly detailed fully 30 major specific issues [collectively called the indictment] with the governance of the King and also a separate general denunciation of the failings of the British populace as a whole.

The "Introduction" of the Declaration of Independence of the USA stating: "When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation." I have seen no such declaration of the causes which impel the UK to their separation from the EU. I perceive the EU and the citizens of the UK should be accorded the decent respect to the opinions of their Unions to explicitly declare such. Others may not perceive such. My British clients have indicate that some of the "causes" are not subjects that their fellow countrypersons are proud or willing to admit to publicly declaring; foremost being an underlying bigotry / xenophobia / nationalism, and associated issue with freedom of movement / immigration.

The "Preamble" of the Declaration of Independence of the United States of America stating inpart: "Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security."

So without an explicit, majority agreed to declaration, one is left pondering the Why of a Brexit?

And without a clear understanding and expression of the Why, it seems to be rather difficult to proceed to a proper resolution of a What and a How of Brexit. The Purpose and Goal sets being ??????

Or as I have simply asked of my English clients regarding Brexit: WTF? To which they similarly reply, they too have no answer to WTF. Well good luck with that!
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Old 16-01-2020, 16:09   #86
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

The above is a very long, and, in my opinion, completely incorrect interpretation of what will happen. We will indeed cease to be members of the EU after 31st Jan 2020 BUT the transition arrangements will then apply. It is my understanding that the transition period will include freedom of movement within the EU for UK passport holders and reciprocal arrangements will apply for EU passport holders. The possibility of a NO DEAL will only apply if the transition period does not result in a DEAL before 31st Dec 2020 - either we will then have a NO DEAL Brexit or the transition period will be extended by mutual agreement.
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Old 16-01-2020, 18:05   #87
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

Brexit is scheduled to occur on January 31, 2020. Take note that the Status Quo ends on that day.

Unless a deal is implemented that changes the current laws of the EU, on February 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020 [a transition period], UK citizens will be able to continue to travel to the Schengen countries, [The EU, Norway, Iceland, Switzerland and Lichtenstein] for tourist purposes using just their passports and will not require obtaining a visa or an ETIAS visa waiver for short stay tourist visits. Short stays being defined as no more than 90 days in any 180 day period.

Beginning on January 1, 2021, UK citizens will be able to visit Schengen countries using their passport but then they must also have an issued ETIAS visa waiver to provide for visa free entry; or lacking the ETIAS visa waiver they will be required to obtain a visa for a short stay visit, again a short stay is no more than 90 days in any 180 day period limitation.

Trips that are for longer stays [more than 90 days in any 180 day period], or for study, or for providing services or business related travels may invokes additional requirements.

Reference specific country requirement links at the following UK government website, strongly recommend one read the requirements for each country you intend to do business or service within. https://www.gov.uk/government/collec...-after-eu-exit


Link to general reference website of the UK government from which one can then link further to specific topical guidance webpages: https://www.gov.uk/visit-europe-brexit

"Travel to the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein will change if the UK leaves the EU with no deal.

Things you may need to do before you go include:

check your passport
get travel insurance that covers your healthcare
check you have the right driving documents
organise pet travel - contact your vet at least 4 months before you go


There are more things to do if you’re travelling for business. For example, going to meetings and conferences, providing services (even with a charity), and touring art or music.

Passports: check if you need to renew
You may need to renew your British passport earlier if you’re travelling after Brexit.

On the day you travel, you’ll need your passport to BOTH:

have at least 6 months left
be less than 10 years old (even if it has 6 months or more left)
If you do not renew it, you may not be able to travel to most EU countries and Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland."


You can use a tool to check whether your passport is valid for the country you’re visiting. Link here: https://www.gov.uk/check-a-passport-...avel-to-europe
Presently these rules do not apply to travel to Ireland. You can continue to use your passport as long as it’s valid for the length of your stay.

It usually takes 3 weeks if you need to renew your passport. There’s a premium service if you need it sooner.

Healthcare: check you’re covered

You should always get appropriate travel insurance with healthcare cover before you go abroad.

After Brexit your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) card may not be valid.

It’s particularly important you get travel insurance with the right cover if you have a pre-existing medical condition. This is because the EHIC scheme covers pre-existing conditions, while many travel insurance policies do not.


You can read advice on buying travel insurance with the right cover.
Reference link here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/foreign-travel-insurance



Note that the Schengen visa free travel arrangement is conditioned on the UK providing reciprocity to such like kind travel for the citizens of the Non-UK Schengen countries. Like kind freedom of movement is required else UK citizens' rights will be suspended. If the UK imposes restrictions of freedom of travel then expect that the EU and the Schengen countries will impose reciprocal restrictions and requirements.


[U]Driving in the EU after Brexit: international driving permits[/U]

Different rules will apply for international driving permits (IDPs) in EU countries. Check which type of IDP you need to drive when you visit Europe.
Reference: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/driving-...riving-permits


You may need one or more international driving permits (IDPs), as well as your UK driving licence to drive in an EU or EEA country.

There are 3 types of IDP:

1926 IDP
1949 IDP
1968 IDP
The type of IDP you need depends on the country you will be driving in.

You may need more than one IDP. For example, when driving through France (1968 IDP) to Andorra (1949 IDP).

Other examples: [Reference link above for specific countries of interest.]
France
You will need a 1968 IDP and your UK licence.

Germany
You will not need an IDP for visits up to 6 months if you have a UK photocard driving licence. You will need a 1968 IDP and your UK licence for longer visits or if you have a paper licence.

Recognition of professional qualifications
You’ll need to have your UK professional qualification officially recognised if you want to work in a profession that is regulated in the EEA or Switzerland. It will need to be recognised by the appropriate regulator for your profession in each country where you intend to work. You’ll need to do this even if you’re providing temporary or occasional professional services.

Professionals already working in an EEA country or Switzerland
You don’t have to do anything if your qualification has already been officially recognised by the relevant regulator in an EEA country or Switzerland. The regulator’s decision to recognise your qualification will remain valid after the UK leaves the EU.
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Old 17-01-2020, 01:24   #88
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Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kas_1611 View Post
From what I have read and understand you have the bulk of it correct. During the "transition" period we should still have the usual rights of an EU Resident/Citizen, ie no limit due to the Schengen rules.

The Cruising Association have confirmed that despite the transition period vessels in the UK on the date of exit (31st Jan now) will instantly lose EU VAT Paid status. Technically this actually includes EU flagged vessels too but I suspect that will be blind-eyed by the relevant authorities.

Once we exit the EU rules on dyed diesel won't apply in the UK so that might solve the current problem facing a lot of marinas and ports but it will still apply when sailing over to EU so I suspect the Belgians in particular will be very harsh on that. Think south coast marinas and ports will have to bring in white diesel eventually as EU boats will not want dyed diesel in their tanks ever.

Personally I think the transition period will be longer than the end of 2020 as the trade talks are almost certainly going to take longer than 10 months. But a deal in principle will almost certainly exist by Dec 2020 so wait and see what happens.
Hopefully not:

Quote:
Thank you for contacting the Europe Direct Contact Centre.

Consequences of the UK's withdrawal from the EU on recreational boats will concern not only customs but also have an indirect tax dimension. The relevant legal bases to which will be
further referred in this letter are: the Union Customs Code (UCC) - Regulation (EU) 952/2013 (OJ L 299/1 of 10.10.2013) - the supplementing Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2015/2446 (UCC-DA) (OJ L 343/1 of 29.12.2015) and the Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2015/2447 (UCC-IA) (OJ L 343/558 of 29.12.2015) for the customs issues. For indirect taxes it concerns the Council directive 2006/112/EC (the VAT Directive) (OJ L 347/1 of 11.12.2006).

Where the recreational boat has been released for free circulation at import in the EU or has been manufactured in the EU, it has obtained the customs status of Union goods.
After the UK's withdrawal from the EU or the end of the transition period in case a Withdrawal Agreement with a transition period is concluded, in general, any goods in the customs territory
of the UK will lose their Union status and will become UK goods. This was also mentioned in a Brexit preparedness note from the Commission, published on 30 January 2018: https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/info...axation_en.pdf. Following the Brexit preparedness notice mentioned above, a specific notice on VAT was published on 11 September 2018:https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/info...ded-tax_en.pdf.

The customs status of a UK boat will depend on its location at that point in time: if the boat is located in an EU port or sails in EU territorial waters, it will keep its Union status; if the boat is located in the UK, its status will be that of a third-country boat when arriving in the territorial waters of the Union, i.e. it will be treated as non-Union goods. Customs controls for such UK boats will be the same as for boats coming from a third country.

We hope you find this information useful. Please contact us again if you have other questions about the European Union, its activities or institutions.
__________________
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Old 17-01-2020, 12:09   #89
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Posts: 304
Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kas_1611 View Post
You know something the rest of us don't?

There is NO DEAL at present. All that has been agreed is the UK is leaving the EU on 31st January at which point we enter into negotiations over the future trading position between UK and EU and a transition period until 31st December 2020 during which time the status quo exists where UK is still a member of the Single Market and Customs Agreement, Free Movement still applies and UK citizens are not subject to Schengen limits.

If a deal can not be agreed between UK and EU and a further transition period is not agreed by 31st Dec 2020 then UK will leave with NO DEAL and the UK will be a 3rd nation country with no customs deal, no free movement and UK citizens will be subject to the 90 days in 180 Schengen limitation.

The commons approved the deal on January 9th.
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Old 17-01-2020, 14:11   #90
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Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 5,220
Re: VAT, EU, British, Non Res.

More popcorn!


Uncertainty continues. The withdrawal agreement has yet to be approved by the House of Lords, and attained the Queen's consent, or approved by the European Parliament.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/polit...awal-Agreement

By LIAM DOYLE
PUBLISHED: 07:45, Wed, Jan 15, 2020 |

"Could the Brexit deal be blocked in the House of Lords?

Now the House of Commons has passed the bill the next stop is the House of Lords. Parliament’s upper chamber undergoes much the same process as the House of Commons.

The Withdrawal Agreement will undergo a first and second reading before progressing to a committee stage, report stage, and final third reading.

The House of Lords does not possess the same power as Commons, as it is unable to prevent bills from becoming law.

While the bill is in the upper chamber, Lords members may make amendments, but it must go back to the House of Commons for changes to take effect.

The Lords cannot stop the bill altogether but may be able to keep it in a state of ‘ping pong’ as it swings between the two Parliamentary chambers, prolonging the legislation and preventing a January 31 exit date."

I have no idea what happens if a Ping Pong game evolves between the two chambers of Parliament and runs into overtime beyond January 31. SNAFU, I suppose.

"Most people may assume the chances of the bill stalling in Lords is low, given Boris Johnson’s election success, however, this is not necessarily the case.

Boris Johnson clinched a Commons majority of 80 on December 12, allowing him to easily pass legislation through the lower house.

However, his staggering lead did not extend to the House of Lords, which operates on unelected peers.

Currently, the House of Lords is controlled by the opposition via a combination of Labour and Liberal Democrat peers.

The Conservatives have 244 members in the House of Lords, while Labour has 181 and the Liberal Democrats 94.

Here is the total composition of the House of Lords:

- Conservative: 244 members

- Labour: 181 members

- Liberal Democrat: 94 members

- Crossbench: 186 members

- Non-affiliated: 48 members

- Bishops: 26 members

- Democratic Unionist Party: Four members

- Green Party: Two members

- Conservative Independent: One member

- Independent Social Democrat: One member

- Independent Ulster Unionist: One member

- Labour Independent: One member

- Plaid Cymru: One member

- Lord Speaker"
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