Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 05-06-2020, 16:25   #46
Registered User

Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 8
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

And, unlike the States, she'll have the same rights to live and work anywhere in the EU as an EU citizen.
ditechspain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2020, 20:31   #47
Registered User
 
tgrimmett's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Greece
Boat: Jeanneau SO 440
Posts: 37
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

We have been cruising in the med for three years, for about 6 mos/yr. I can confirm others suggestions for non Schengen options. Croatia could easily be a whole summer. Montenegro, beautiful. We have obtained a France long stay visa for two of the seasons. Didn't need it last year as we spent so much time in Croatia. It's very easy to get. We did a YT video on it. https://youtu.be/KMsYojcCe_E. Just be careful you don't ask for the 'resident visa' version, as that will have more requirements when you land in France, but worse, with you considered a resident, require you to immediately pay VAT. We used the France visa as it was very easy. For medical evac insurance, we used divers alert network, very reasonable. I have heard Spain's visa is doable but others would need to comment. Good luck! www.lifefourpointzero.com
tgrimmett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2020, 09:31   #48
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 47
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

We applied for and received a non-lucrative visa and associated Permiso de Residencia in Spain. The application process is laborious but not difficult, and it's not free.

Everything you need to know is available on the Spanish Embassy's web page for your country. In the U.S. its at: Residence Visa (Non-Lucrative)

In a nutshell, you'll need:
- Copy of Passports
- Copy of the birth certificates
- Medical certificates of good health
- Marriage license
* This must be legalized with the Apostille of the Hague and translated by a "Sworn Spanish Translator."
*Because marriage licenses are issued by states and we were married in Florida, the Apostille of the Hague was done at the state capital, Tallahassee.
- Health insurance
* Private Spanish health insurance is preferred, but U.S. Military TRICARE was accepted for us.
- Proof of sufficient funds (minimum €26.000 per applicant)
- FBI check (requires fingerprinting)

Most of the above documents have a fee to get from their source, and then they must be notorized (for a fee) and translated into Spanish by a "Sworn Spanish Translator" (for a fee).

Submit everything in person at the Spanish Consulate that services your U.S. state of legal residence, and pay the processing fee. We are Florida residents, and the Consulate is in Miami.

Some consulates require appointments, but in Miami it's first come first serve, but with a limited number of slots per day. We arrived at 07:30, and the Consulate opened at 0900. We were fifth in line, and they were only seeing 15 applicants that day. They had reached their daily quota shortly after they opened. You will find out that day if everything is in order. If it is, it takes 2-4 weeks to get your visa afixed into your passport. You can pick it up in person, or they will mail it to you. But you're not done...

Within 10 days of arriving in Spain, you need to go to an Immigration Office. Most National Police offices have one. There, you'll need to provide evidence of your domicile in Spain. We used the address of the marina where we were docked, but it's not as simple as showing a bill from the marina.

First we had to go to the ayuntamiento (town hall) and register as citizens in the town. They accepted a 1-month contract at the marina, but it took 2 weeks for them to process our application, and put their official stamp/seal on the form we received back at the police office.

Then it was back to the National Police office to consummate the process and receive our Spanish ID cards with the heading Permiso de Residencia. Everything was submitted on 6 December; however, our ID card was not available for pickup for ~6 weeks. It's valid for one year from 6 December. We're told it is easy to renew, and the first renewal is valid for 3 years.

We orchestrated everything ourselves - my wife deserves the credit for her attention to detail - except for the Apostille of the Hague, for which we hired an agent in Miami, significantly reducing the turnaround time from a few weeks to a few days. Also, there are companies that will do everything for you, for a hefty fee of course.

Again, none of the above is difficult, but it is laborious. And the Spanish Consular Officers follow the published requirements to the letter.

We hope this helps.
dlane1181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2020, 09:46   #49
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,011
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dlane1181 View Post
We applied for and received a non-lucrative visa and associated Permiso de Residencia in Spain. The application process is laborious but not difficult, and it's not free.
...
That is very interesting information. Thank you.

Does the non-lucrative visa and/or Permiso de Residencia trigger VAT on the boat?

Later,
Dan
dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2020, 07:02   #50
Registered User
 
StoneCrab's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 294
Images: 1
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

I am a little surprised that someone hasn't made a business out of decoding all of this for cruisers who would like to state their intentions and leave all the paperwork to someone else.
StoneCrab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2020, 07:52   #51
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 47
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

The non-lucrative visa is for people, and does not apply to property or vessels.
Our research suggests what others have written, specifically, a non-EU/non-VAT vessel can remain in the EU (which is different than Schengan, although lots of overlap) for 180 days. But if the vessel leaves the EU for 1 day, the clock is reset.
dlane1181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2020, 08:22   #52
Registered User

Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 8
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

Schengen is just a treaty allowing free movement of people within a group of countries that generally don't then apply immigration controls when you pass from one to the other. So when you go through passport control entering one, you generally don't need to show your passport when you move to the next one. However the rules on residence permits for non-EU citizens are decided on a national basis, as are any registration requirements for EU citizens as long as they apply equally to all EU citizens. There are exceptions to do with security or health concerns. The UK and Ireland have had a similar arrangement between them for decades.

It has no relevance to the passage of material goods such as boats or cars.

I think you'll find there are two separate 6 month requirments. Once you've spent 6 months in a 12 month period using your boat in a single country your boat is likely to be required to comply with local rules on registration, taxation and equipment levels, as may you as skipper. My impression is that if you are in popular tourism areas in Spain enforcement tends to avoid killling the Golden Goose. In less frequently visited areas like Valencia the approach is less understanding. However if you're cruising from one country to the next that's fairly easy to avoid.

The problem really comes when you approach the time limit on using your non-VAT boat in EU waters under a short term exemption from import and VAT liability, and it wouldn't surprise me to learn that some officals interpet the rules more aggressively and/or don't understand them.
ditechspain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2020, 19:15   #53
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 1,698
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

Quote:
Originally Posted by hpeer View Post
I canít understand the confusion, itís all so simple.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_Area
You might consider a retirement visa ...no work , economically self sufficient

Malta is common for Americans and retired seaman

No tax on foreign income , Schengen country

It could be of interest to you

https://identitymalta.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Checklist-for-TCNs-applying-for-a-residence-permit-on-the-basis-of-economic-self-sufficiency.pdf


Do some googling , ask some questions , contact the Maltese embassy in Washington

And remember ....,

Never believe me or anything you read on the internet
slug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2020, 00:25   #54
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 14
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

Which marina are you in.
Xanthe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2020, 01:14   #55
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 159
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

When we were sailing in Europe the maximum stay for a yacht was 6 months.
Michael Cobbe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2020, 01:24   #56
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 14
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

Peterlewis19 In which marina are you in Tunisia?
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannc View Post
That is very interesting information. Thank you.

Does the non-lucrative visa and/or Permiso de Residencia trigger VAT on the boat?

Later,
Dan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xanthe View Post
Which marina are you in.
Xanthe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2020, 07:47   #57
Registered User
 
CatNewBee's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2017
Boat: Lagoon 400S2
Posts: 3,004
Images: 3
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Cobbe View Post
When we were sailing in Europe the maximum stay for a yacht was 6 months.
18 months for the yacht, 6 for the crew.
__________________
Lagoon 400S2 refit for cruising: LiFeYPO4, solar and electric galley...
CatNewBee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2020, 07:56   #58
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,247
Re: Is There an Accepted/Easy Way to Deal With Schengen 90 Day Rules?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CatNewBee View Post
18 months for the yacht, 6 for the crew.
For non-EU residents:

90 days out of the prior 180 days for the crew with no way to reset other than wait it out.

Boat is 18 months but you can put it in bond while out of the EU or if you can get even a single day outside the EU, you can reset and get a fresh 18 months.
valhalla360 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
rule

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
400: Is there an easy way to attach a furler to the bowsprit CatNewBee Lagoon Catamarans 33 23-09-2020 12:34
Schengen Rules Possibly to Change yet Again svBeBe Europe & Mediterranean 14 25-04-2014 15:11
Schengen rules have changed Katiusha Europe & Mediterranean 135 02-04-2014 22:35
Is There An Easy Way To Change Your Username ? Spencer75 Forum Tech Support & Site Help 5 11-08-2013 01:27

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 16:32.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.