Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 07-12-2020, 09:50   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: RI, USA
Boat: Omega 36
Posts: 52
US Atlantic Coast

Hello everybody,
I sailed from Martha's Vineyard to Ocean City. I was ~50 nm far from the land. When I approached Ocean City I wondered: should I call the coast guard? I decided not to bother. So nothing happened, but now I'm thinking: was I lucky?
Kolchac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2020, 11:26   #2
Registered User
 
AnsleyS's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Maine
Boat: Kadey Krogen 42
Posts: 162
Re: US Atlantic Coast

There is no need to bother the government if you are coastal cruising. If you go from port to port within the US you are fine. If you see a coast guard plane or vessel near you, make sure that you monitor channel 16 as they may want to ask who you are and where you are going or coming from. It is all part of their drug enforcement responsibilities. They can stop and board you whenever they like but you don't need to call them unless you are coming in from another country.
AnsleyS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2020, 20:27   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: RI, USA
Boat: Omega 36
Posts: 52
Re: US Atlantic Coast

Legally I exited US territory, even the contiguous zone, and in three days I entered the territory again. I think it is not a simple question, probably for pros, who knows this subject.
Kolchac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2020, 20:45   #4
Registered User
 
Jamme's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: New York
Boat: Beneteau Oceanis 31
Posts: 134
Re: US Atlantic Coast

According to https://help.cbp.gov/s/article/Artic...language=en_US, you do not seem to have to report at least to CBP:
All operators of a non-commercial small vessel/pleasure boat must report immediately to the nearest U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Port of Entry upon arriving into the United States (U.S) “from a foreign port or place”.
__________________
"I always arrive late at the office, but I make up for it by leaving early.” – Charles Lamb
Jamme is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2020, 20:51   #5
Registered User
 
Dsanduril's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Petersburg, AK
Boat: Outremer 50S
Posts: 3,722
Re: US Atlantic Coast

No reporting required when sailing from US port to US port so long as you don't stop in a foreign country. California-Hawaii-Alaska puts you in a lot of non-US water, but the only reporting required is with State of Hawaii Dept. of Agriculture.
Dsanduril is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2020, 22:26   #6
Registered User
 
Kelkara's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Vancouver Island
Boat: Hullmaster 27
Posts: 701
Re: US Atlantic Coast

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dsanduril View Post
No reporting required when sailing from US port to US port so long as you don't stop in a foreign country. California-Hawaii-Alaska puts you in a lot of non-US water, but the only reporting required is with State of Hawaii Dept. of Agriculture.
It is being assumed that the OP has a US registered boat ... foreign yachts have to report to CBP every time they move to a new "port or place".
Kelkara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2020, 22:43   #7
Registered User
 
Dsanduril's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Petersburg, AK
Boat: Outremer 50S
Posts: 3,722
Re: US Atlantic Coast

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelkara View Post
It is being assumed that the OP has a US registered boat ... foreign yachts have to report to CBP every time they move to a new "port or place".
Absolutely right, big assumption on my part.
Dsanduril is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-12-2020, 09:23   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: RI, USA
Boat: Omega 36
Posts: 52
Re: US Atlantic Coast

So all of you suggest that a boat, which enters the US territorial waters from the international waters may not report to the Coast Guard:

1. for that the Coast Guard should know that the same boat sails away to the international waters from, let say, Cape Code or Portland, but not from Nova Scotia, or Bermuda. And they should watch every boat in international waters far behind the horizon line (how?) and track their movement for days to catch when they visit a foreign port. Also, in the international waters, the boat may pick up some illegal things from other boats or ships.

2. Some of you suggest that a US-registered boat does not need to report.
Again, how the Coast Guard knows without contact the boat, it is a US-registered one? What about the crew? Let say, from North Korea, Siria, or Iran? Do not bother to report??

I wouldn't ask if it was a strait on the website. I would appreciate some kind of a legal answer or at least a logical one.
Kolchac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-12-2020, 09:36   #9
Registered User
 
Mickeyrouse's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Texas
Boat: Hinckley Bermuda 40
Posts: 360
Images: 4
Re: US Atlantic Coast

I think what we have here is the collision of logic versus regulations. The Coast Guard does not require US registered vessels sailing coastwise to report. Period. How they know where you have departed from is their problem, though admittedly it could be your problem if you are boarded and delayed at your point of arrival. Suspicious-looking activity, though totally harmless has always been able to attract unwanted attention.
__________________
Why won’t the money go as far as the boat will?
Mickeyrouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-12-2020, 11:44   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: RI, USA
Boat: Omega 36
Posts: 52
Re: US Atlantic Coast

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickeyrouse View Post
...The Coast Guard does not require US registered vessels sailing coastwise to report. Period. .
The problem is in your definition of "coastal cruising".
Wikipedia has a different opinion, more logical from my point of view:

Sailing near the coast (coastal cruising) gives a certain amount of safety. A ship is always granted 'innocent passage' through the country (most countries usually claim up to 22 km (14 mi) off the coast).
Kolchac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-12-2020, 14:35   #11
Registered User
 
Captv's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Where the boat happened to be at the time.
Boat: Delfini II, Aloha 32
Posts: 20
Re: US Atlantic Coast

It’s 12 Nm. 200 Nm considered economic zone. That’s also the navigation limit of a near coastal license. 6 pax license allow you to go out to 100 Nm. If you are a US registered or documented vessel, (state vs Fed registry) then you can depart from any US port and return to any US port even if you circumnavigate the Atlantic but you never clear into any foreign port that includes the Bahamas as well. The only exception is if you want to go from the east coast of the US to the West coast of the US via Panama Canal.
Technically, if you go around the Cape Horn an you never land anywhere, you can enter the US without checking in.
You would have documentation if you entered to any foreign country and it would be a major problem if you departed to continue without a departure clearance. So that would show that you were in a foreign port. Usually a call to the USCBP is enough. When you clear back in from a foreign port to the US if you are a US flagged vessel. They’ll tell you whether you need to come in or if they’ll come out to inspect. Otherwise, no need to bother.
Btw. You need a sticker or something from the CBP prior leaving. They use that upon your return.
So no worries how far you’ve been offshore before you make port as long as there was no stop in an other country.
Someone said that you should monitor ch 16, that is correct. You should for several reasons one of which is in case the USCG aircraft or Edsel or a navy vessel calls.
It is good practice to stay well outside the 12 Nm limit from land while navigating in foreign waters, so there’s no question as to your position. Whichever country’s economical zone you pass through has the rights to board you for inspection. Often the USCG does it for some countries for drug interdiction if they have such agreement, with officers from that county present onboard the USCG vessel. This should be it in a nutshell.
Captv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-01-2021, 18:01   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 9
Re: US Atlantic Coast

Captv, what sticker are you referring to? "You need a sticker or something from the CBP prior leaving. " For a day sail?
wetdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-01-2021, 18:10   #13
Registered User
 
Captv's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Where the boat happened to be at the time.
Boat: Delfini II, Aloha 32
Posts: 20
Re: US Atlantic Coast

Not for a day sail. It’s for re-entry from foreign port. As far as I know when you call in upon arrival you give them the number on it, that brings up all info they need. Then they make a determination if they just check you in over the phone, come out to inspect or have you sail to an other port of entry to do the process. That last one is of course if you make landfall at a port that is not an actual port of entry.
Captv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2021, 11:00   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: RI, USA
Boat: Omega 36
Posts: 52
Re: US Atlantic Coast

When you leave the USA for a foreign port you do not need to do anything. For re-entry US from a foreign port, you must report CBP. I would recommend installing CBP ROAM from Google Play. It works perfectly for me on Samsung Note 8.
If you came from nowhere, read a Captv note. The Coast Guard is interested only in safety, CBP - 200 Nm. But when I spoke to the officials, they told me better watch 100 Nm.
Kolchac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2021, 11:42   #15
Registered User
 
bobnlesley's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Aground in the Yorkshire Dales, awaiting a very high tide.
Posts: 639
Re: US Atlantic Coast

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelkara View Post
... foreign yachts have to report to CBP every time they move to a new "port or place".
Is that a new regulation for the Covid-age?
Certainly when we were there on our foreign-flagged yacht, once we'd checked-in and been issued with a cruising permit, the only subsequent reporting requirement was a phone call to the Coast Guard whenever we moved into a new Coast Guard Area. This led us into what we felt to be perhaps our very strangest check-in, when having arrived in North Carolina, ten days after we'd sailed out of Bahia de Boqueron in Puerto Rico, the only requirement imposed upon us by US Homeland Security was to make a telephone call to the CG office in Wilmington.
__________________
I chose the road less travelled, now where the hell am I?
bobnlesley is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
USA NOAA US Coast Pilot 4 Atlantic Coast Published Sept 16 2018 Edition Steadman Uhlich Navigation 1 20-09-2018 08:18
Barnegat to Atlantic Atlantic city. Inside unbusted67 Navigation 3 27-11-2014 06:48
Coast Guard Rescue off the mid atlantic coast caribnsol Cruising News & Events 22 16-05-2008 18:54
Best Stops Heading North Along Atlantic Coast? Sonosailor Atlantic & the Caribbean 22 09-12-2005 07:06

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 20:05.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.