Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 09-06-2022, 12:00   #1
Registered User
 
Sailor Sailor's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Glen Allen, VA
Boat: Sabre 34-1 CB, 34 feet
Posts: 123
USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

https://chesapeakebaymagazine.com/vi...wXqU6ruPS7Gh_E

The U.S.C.G. rescues 3 sailors off their Beneteau Oceanis 39 Faule Haut from Tropical Storm Alex - 40 kt. winds and 10-12 foot seas...

The boat blog: http://faule-haut.de/yacht/
Sailor Sailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2022, 12:13   #2
Registered User
 
Sailor Sailor's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Glen Allen, VA
Boat: Sabre 34-1 CB, 34 feet
Posts: 123
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

From the boat's log:

Faule Haut in a Tropical Cyclone
Sun Jun 05 2022

She’s in it.
The tropical cyclone moved a lot faster than predicted. And it has changed its course more easterly. It’s been following us. It has reached Faule Haut and is running over her. She must be directly in it. 45 knots of wind is the instrument showing. Third reef in and the storm jib hoisted on the second forestay sailing close hauled against the wind. This is hell. Skipper is considering taking all sails down, but this would mean that Faule Haut would drift backwards to where she came from. If the digital shows 50 knots he has to do it. FH is heeling like crazy and shaken by breaking waves.
Crew and Skipper are hoping that the center of the cyclone will be ahead of her soon, because then they would get a better wind angle. Sailing close hauled in 45 knots is a nightmare.

https://forecast.predictwind.com/tra.../SV_FauleHaut/
Sailor Sailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2022, 12:15   #3
Registered User
 
Sailor Sailor's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Glen Allen, VA
Boat: Sabre 34-1 CB, 34 feet
Posts: 123
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

Apparently no drogue or para-anchor aboard, last post before rescue:

32 01.316n 69 28.442w
„Anchor down“ in the middle of the ocean
Sun Jun 05 2022

For lack of a sea anchor, Faule Haut has dropped her stern anchor over 5,000 m water depth. It’s a desperate try to keep her from drifting too fast. In addition as well, the biggest and longest rode she has on board, was connected on he stern cleat and thrown over board. These are recommended procedures to use in these conditions. It is also supposed to keep the boat on track, so that it won’t get positioned 90į to the incoming waves.
Still in 45 kn of winds.
Sailor Sailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2022, 16:41   #4
Moderator
 
JPA Cate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: aboard, cruising in Australia
Boat: Sayer 46' Solent rig sloop
Posts: 25,463
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

Maybe they were running behind with their planning (It IS hurricane season)... some reasons people do it is when their visa is expired, they don't want to pay for an extension; they might have a schedule with something important; boat repairs; and I don't have a clue why they were out there. However, once overtaken by a hurricane, their options were limited, and then, having lost the mast, they'd be lying ahull, drifting beam to, downwind, a position very prone to being rolled over, repeatedly. Furthermore, the swell starts coming from 180 degrees out of phase with what you already had, and those confused seas are very stressful on boats, and the people inside. It is also very noisy. It is very hard to cook--a time for finger food before and after the eye moves over. I understand the reasoning behind wanting to be rescued. Poor guys.

It isn't that making progress to windward in 45 knots is impossible--if caught out, we usually slow the boat way down, so she's loafing along around 3 knots, heeled over and going up and down a lot--and with no hull flexing that we're aware of; but they might have been way better off to have turned downwind, under just the storm jib (at least they had one). One option I don't know if they had was to use a headsail, shackled together on a long line for a drogue. Also don't know the cause of the boat being entirely mastless. Perhaps they had to jettison it, depending on where it broke.

I feel rather sad for them. If they had stopped the boat, or almost stopped it, the storm would have gone over them; in our experience, within about 6 hrs. When you're out there, though, you hate to give up ground you've fought for tooth and nail. Wonder if they scuppered her?

Dang! What a pity!

Ann
__________________
Who scorns the calm has forgotten the storm.
JPA Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2022, 21:28   #5
Nearly an old salt
 
goboatingnow's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Lefkas Marina ,Greece
Boat: Bavaria 36
Posts: 20,953
Images: 3
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

As a previous owner of a 393 , itís a well screwed together boat. Sad to see this happen
__________________
Interested in smart boat technology, networking and all things tech
goboatingnow is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2022, 04:09   #6
Registered User
 
Sailor Sailor's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Glen Allen, VA
Boat: Sabre 34-1 CB, 34 feet
Posts: 123
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

From the owner's blog, the boat was rolled 360 degrees by a rogue wave - windows exploded, plexiglass companionway disintegrated, but still afloat:

"But then, without any warning, in the middle of the night, a wave hit the port side.

It’s indescribable.

It sounded and felt like three trucks ramming into you at the same time. I thought FH was falling apart, shattered into thousand pieces.

I had read about „monster waves“ and „freak waves“ before . Now I know they exist.

Water shot in the boat from every open or broken window and through the companion way whose door and sliding door were crashed and gone. But at the same time she went around, 360į to the left. We capsized right through. A full turn. The rotation was extremely fast, probably took less than three seconds. I flew against the ceiling and back onto my bunk. And then the entire contents of what I had stowed under the bunk fell on me. The three batteries (3◊65 kg) were torn out of place and their fixings and two of them were on the floor in front of my bunk. Lucky, that none of the 65 kg hit me. My door had been blown away and was floating in the saloon. My American friend, whose door was also blown off was hit in the head and suffered a laceration above the eye, fortunately it was not too serious. It could also be that he was hit by the wall between the bunk and the engine room. That wall got kicked out too. Naturally, the deck was under water during the turn and it shot through all three windows into my bunk. The closed window above the navigation table was also blown out. We ran out and I thought I had to throw out the life raft immediately. I was glad that at least this, was still there."

FH killed by a tropical cyclonej

Owner claimed he could not steer in 50 knot winds, and lay ahull. It seems the conventional wisdom is to do something to prevent the boat from laying beam-to the waves. I suspect in these kinds of conditions, you probably regret having all the freeboard and voluminous interior space that contributes to out-of-control drift. Batteries had not been adequated secured - very dangerous. I can't help thinking if he had set a para-anchor off the bow, he might have survived this better.
Sailor Sailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2022, 08:01   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 427
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor Sailor View Post
From the boat's log:

Faule Haut in a Tropical Cyclone
Sun Jun 05 2022

Sheís in it.
The tropical cyclone moved a lot faster than predicted. And it has changed its course more easterly. Itís been following us. It has reached Faule Haut and is running over her. She must be directly in it. 45 knots of wind is the instrument showing. Third reef in and the storm jib hoisted on the second forestay sailing close hauled against the wind. This is hell. Skipper is considering taking all sails down, but this would mean that Faule Haut would drift backwards to where she came from. If the digital shows 50 knots he has to do it. FH is heeling like crazy and shaken by breaking waves.
Crew and Skipper are hoping that the center of the cyclone will be ahead of her soon, because then they would get a better wind angle. Sailing close hauled in 45 knots is a nightmare.

https://forecast.predictwind.com/tra.../SV_FauleHaut/

The commentary being educational, Monday quarterbacking, and no idea what the actual weather forecast for that location showed, the error chain is 1) close hauled? that will simply put one into high stress on the rig- 2) with no barometer info mentioned, it is hard to second guess if the vessel direction was exiting the weather 3) when a vessel gets offshore, particularly in that area, waves are often confused when in conflict with the gulf stream and other undersea forces/currents/wave reflections. That said, it sounds like she simply fell off the wave, lost steerage, and rolled.
boat driver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2022, 08:07   #8
Registered User
 
bailsout's Avatar

Join Date: May 2013
Location: Morro Bay, CA
Boat: Herreshoff 28 modified ketch- wood
Posts: 378
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

Would heaving-to sooner prevented the dismasting? Was there not enough mast to effect a heave-to after the dismasting? Does that model not heave-to very well? My sympathies.
bailsout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2022, 08:30   #9
Registered User
 
Greatest Lakes's Avatar

Join Date: May 2021
Location: Michigan
Boat: Columbia 9.6, Hunter Cherubini 37, Jeanneau 57
Posts: 237
Images: 3
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

Having ports and windows blow out is a serious detriment to your mental well being. As is having loose floorboards, batteries and anything else heavier than a roll of toilet paper flying around if you are unfortunate enough to get rolled. There is not much you can do about breaking waves sometimes, but you have to be able to control the boats direction in relationship with the waves. I agree that a sea anchor was a critical item that may have saved the boat. I'm not sure dragging the stern anchor was the best move. I had not heard of using the headsail as an emergency sea anchor, but that is certainly an option compared to the potential loss of a vessel. Sounds to me like sails were still up when they got rolled. That's a rough day.
Greatest Lakes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2022, 08:45   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Southern California
Boat: Catalina 320
Posts: 1,167
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

2010 was last time I got caught in 45 +kts., don't know what it's like trying to "face" it, I start running down wind under bare poles like a little girl chased by the boogieman at 35.
Calif.Ted is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2022, 09:24   #11
Registered User
 
Sailor Sailor's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Glen Allen, VA
Boat: Sabre 34-1 CB, 34 feet
Posts: 123
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calif.Ted View Post
2010 was last time I got caught in 45 +kts., don't know what it's like trying to "face" it, I start running down wind under bare poles like a little girl chased by the boogieman at 35.
That seems to be the typical tactic advised now, but some question its efficacy if you are not on a fully-crewed raceboat. It takes concentration and skilled steering. Also, there always seems to be a pitch for buying a Jordan Series Drogue with that tactic. Supposedly, the problem with running downwind is you prolong your position in the storm, and eventually broach, just as with lying a-hull.

Alternatively, some advise lying to a para-anchor on a bridle to keep your bow pointed into the wind, with a trysail if necessary.

There is a useful inventory of storm tactics on Victor Shane's Drag Device Database: https://dragdevicedb.com/
Sailor Sailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2022, 09:25   #12
Registered User
 
Greatest Lakes's Avatar

Join Date: May 2021
Location: Michigan
Boat: Columbia 9.6, Hunter Cherubini 37, Jeanneau 57
Posts: 237
Images: 3
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calif.Ted View Post
2010 was last time I got caught in 45 +kts., don't know what it's like trying to "face" it, I start running down wind under bare poles like a little girl chased by the boogieman at 35.
I've been stuck in 60+ for a few hours, the water in the air stings when it hits you. I dont recommend it. Due to a lee shore, we had to be into the wind. Had 2 reefs in the main, wishing we had 3. Still making way. Broke my top batten. Everything else was fine. I honestly like heavy weather sailing when it's just me and I'm not worried about anyone else. Winds 25-35kts can be a lot of fun so long as you are prepared for it and it's not going to be for long, or at night...
Greatest Lakes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2022, 12:27   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Martinique Island French Caribbean
Boat: Cal-40
Posts: 377
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

When your way out there and all this happens...... well I guess thatís the time you start to think about that Jesus dude and what he might be able to do for you. Hell, your willing to cut all kinds of deals with him if he would consider bringing that wind down and few notches. Happened to me and Iím Jewish.
Siberian Sea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2022, 13:42   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Flowery Branch, GA
Boat: C-26
Posts: 139
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

40 K winds and 10' seas? Hell, that's an exciting Sunday afternoon in my book.
All joking aside, that can get very serious, very quickly. I got in that Nor'easter off Hatteras that took down the 54' Trashman and 40' Vera and their 5 crew in October 1980. Left out of Beaufort headed for the Abacos. We didn't have electronics in those days and it caught everyone by surprise. Winds built to 50k and waves were as high as 40' according to USCG. Every wave had to be navigated to assure we didn't get broadsided and rolled. My mate Robert and I sailed it all afternoon and night for 18 hours in a Spirit 23, bare poles except for my storm sail. Drogue deployed. Cabin top and companionway lashed tightly to the toe rail. Life raft/dinghy doubly secured. The ocean was just a sea of white foam as far as one could see.
Very little in this life can scare me but that storm did. In my log I wrote, "I doubt I'll ever see my wife and kids again."
The boat, captain and first mate survived and eventually made it to West End.
Lionshooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2022, 14:56   #15
Registered User
 
capn_billl's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Naples, FL
Boat: Leopard Catamaran
Posts: 2,485
Re: USCG rescue dismasted Beneteau Oceanis 39 from Alex

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calif.Ted View Post
2010 was last time I got caught in 45 +kts., don't know what it's like trying to "face" it, I start running down wind under bare poles like a little girl chased by the boogieman at 35.
Me too.

That was my first thought, "close hauled in a tropical storm, are they nuts?".

I think it's time to review a few word definitions.

"Average" means Average. if the average wave is 20ft, some waves will ne little tiny, some will be double that.

I'm more convinced running downwind is the most survivable, at least in the 30-50knot range, and I hope to never be out in anything more than that.

2 days to make up loss from a storm isn't bad, I keep well more stores than that on an ocean voyage.

I also have both a Sea Anchor, and drogue on board, and I'm buying a better drogue, I don't like the one I've got.

I know we are monday morning quarterbacking here, but seriously, close hauled in 45knots?
capn_billl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
beneteau, mast, oceanis, rescue

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beneteau 473 vis Beneteau Oceanis 473 what is difference? Freshman Monohull Sailboats 32 01-12-2015 18:09
Tropical Storm Alex May Form in Next Few Days PyotrBee Atlantic & the Caribbean 20 25-06-2010 23:42

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:25.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.