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Old 12-03-2022, 04:22   #1
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Shipwreck discoveries

It's been a good month for shipwreck hunters.

Polar explorer Ernest Shackleton's ship HMS “Endurance” was discovered more than 3,000 meters (9,843 feet) deep in Antarctica's Southern Ocean, more than a century after it sank in 1915.

Meanwhile, the 130-year-old wreckage of the ship “Atlanta” has finally been discovered at the bottom of Michigan's Lake Superior, a shipwreck historical society recently announced. The 172-foot (52-meter) schooner barge was carrying a load of coal when it sunk during a storm in May 1891.

Shipwreck Society Finds "Atlanta" at Bottom of Lake Superior after 130 Years
The 172-foot schooner-barge “Atlanta” was found 35 miles off Deer Park, Mich., in 650 feet of water, in Lake Superior.
https://www.shipwreckmuseum.com/ship...ter-130-years/

The “Atlanta” sank on May 4, 1891. It was upbound, with a load of coal, in tow of the steamer Wilhelm when both vessels got caught in a northwest gale. The storm was too much for the towline which snapped, and with no sails, the Atlanta was soon at the mercy of the lake, and the crew took to the lifeboat. They pulled at the oars for several hours and eventually came within site of the Crisp Point Life-Saving Station. While attempting to land their small boat near the station, it overturned and only two of the crew made it safely to the beach.
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Old 12-03-2022, 04:24   #2
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

Incredible stories about history's most tragic ships
Maritime disasters are, sadly, not unusual, and according to UNESCO:
Quote:
An estimated 3 million shipwrecks are spread across ocean floors around the planet. Some of these wrecks are thousands of years old and can provide precious historical information. A shipwreck by nature is testimony to trade and cultural dialogue between peoples. It also functions as a time capsule, providing a complete snapshot of the life on board at the time of sinking...
More from UNESCO ➥ Wrecks | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

Follows, some of the most poignant stories, about famous ships, that have been claimed by the seas, through time.

The "Mary Rose" [1545]

Probably built in around 1510-11, the Mary Rose was one of Henry VIII’s naval fleet, and said to be the king's favourite ship, during her 34 years of service. Heavily armed, with a crew of 400-500 men, she saw frequent action against the French. Then, in 1545, the Mary Rose was in the Solent (between Great Britain and the Isle of Wight), when she attempted to make a sharp turn. A strong gust blew the ship over, and, as the gun ports were open, the ship sank, with the loss of almost all onboard. As she went down in only 40ft (12m) of water, efforts were made at the time to retrieve her, but failed.

In the 1960s, archaeologists located the wreck, and hundreds of artefacts were recovered. In 1982, the world held its breath, as the nearly 500-year-old ship was brought to the surface, live on television. She now rests at the Mary Rose Museum, in Portsmouth, kept constantly moist to preserve the timbers. Around 19,000 fascinating every-day objects are on permanent display there, plus the skeletons, and facial reconstructions of the tragic crew.

More about ➥ https://maryrose.org/about-the-mary-...SAAEgKsu_D_BwE
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Old 12-03-2022, 04:29   #3
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

The “Vasa” [1628]

During the 17th century, the Thirty Years War was raging in Europe and King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden knew he needed a strong naval presence in the Baltic. He commissioned the Vasa ship to be built with two gun decks, 64 bronze cannons and a crew of 450 men. On 10 August 1628, the ship set sail on its maiden voyage but only a few metres offshore, as everyone watched, disaster struck and the ship keeled over and sank with the loss of about 150 men.

In 1962, the ship was salvaged and brought to the surface. The intricately beautiful carvings and miraculous state of preservation were a wonder to behold. However, it was clear that the reason the ship sank was from a fatal flaw in its design. It was so badly constructed that even a light breeze would have knocked it over. Today, however, the Vasa ship takes pride of place as a major attraction at its own museum in central Stockholm.

More about ➥ https://www.vasamuseet.se/en
And ➥ https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart...ing-180964328/
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Old 13-03-2022, 03:28   #4
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

The "White Ship" [1120]

Nine hundred years ago, William, the only legitimate son of King Henry I of England, was returning from France, with a huge entourage. At Normandy, they boarded the "White Ship", a state-of-the-art vessel, on its maiden voyage. William requested wine be brought onboard, and soon the whole party was roaring drunk.
They set sail at midnight, hit a rock, and sank quickly in the English Channel.
The heir to the throne, and the cream of English aristocracy were drowned – around 300 in all, and it's been called the "Titanic" of its day.
After 900 years, there is hope the shipwreck may have been found, near Barfleur. A team, from the Institute of Digital Archaeology, dived the site, in June 2021, and discovered a vessel, which is likely to be the remains of The White Ship. Investigations are ongoing.

More ➥ https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...hite-Ship.html
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Old 14-03-2022, 02:09   #5
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

The Marie Celeste, 1872
On 5 December 1872, a ghost ship was found sailing 400 nautical miles off the Portuguese Azores islands in the Atlantic ocean. There were no signs of life onboard nor any indications of panic or a struggle, although the only lifeboat was missing.
Captain Benjamin Spooner Briggs, his wife Sarah, two-year-old daughter Sophia Matilda and six other crew of the merchant ship had simply vanished into thin air.
The last [deck] log entry was on 25 November, when the ship was six miles from, and within sight of, the Azores island of Santa Maria.
The Marie Celeste remains one of the world’s greatest unsolved mysteries.
More ➥ https://www.smithsonianmag.com/histo...ste-174488104/
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Old 14-03-2022, 11:14   #6
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

I've been diving on just a single wreck, the RMS Rhone in the BVI.


Laid down in 1863, she was a 310' passenger liner with both a steam engine and a pair of masts. Also sported one of the first bronze props ever made. Sank during the 1867 San Narciso hurricane, with only 25 survivors.


It's a pretty famous wreck so I'm sure most everybody here knows the story already, but if not, it's well worth a read.
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Old 14-03-2022, 13:42   #7
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodShipLolipop View Post
I've been diving on just a single wreck, the RMS Rhone in the BVI.

Laid down in 1863, she was a 310' passenger liner with both a steam engine and a pair of masts. Also sported one of the first bronze props ever made...
Indeed.

In 1827 Josef Ressel invented, patented and successfully trialed a ‘never-ending screw’ propulsion system. After manual trials, on a smaller vessel, his bronze screw propeller was installed on the “Civetta”, a 48 tonne steamboat, and reached speeds of approximately 6 knots.

Ressel’s designs caught the imagination of other engineers, and a whole host of similar trials were undertaken across Europe, during the 19th century, including John Patch in 1832, Francis Petit Smith and J Ericsson in 1836 and Isambard Kingdom Brunel in 1845.

The “Rhone” was built in England, in 1865, by Millwall Iron Works, for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company; and was equipped with double masts and sails; but its primary form of propulsion was a single compound steam engine, which was used to drive a gigantic three-bladed bronze propeller. This massive, almost six-foot propeller, may have been the second of its kind, ever created, for use by a ship, and helped Rhone reach speeds up to 14 knots.
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Old 15-03-2022, 02:31   #8
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

HMS "Terror" and "Erebus", [1845]

In May 1845, the British navy sent an expedition to find a northerly route from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Sir John Franklin set off with two steamships, the “Terror” and “Erebus”, each reinforced with iron, to cut through the Arctic ice.
The expedition comprised 133 men, state-of-the-art equipment plus, three year’s worth of the latest invention – tinned food. The ships were seen in July at Baffin Island, Canada, then disappeared.

The story grabbed the public imagination, with Charles Dickens and Mark Twain writing about the mystery. Numerous rescue expeditions were sent out, and a timeline has been pieced together, from notes left by the men, found in strategic places, conversations with Inuit peoples, and recent marine archaeology.

It seems by 1846, the ships had become trapped in the ice, off King William Island, Nunavut, and did not move for two years. In 1847, Franklin died, and Captain Francis Crozier took charge.

Inuit peoples report hunting expeditions, with Crozier and his men, in 1849, and 1850. The last evidence of the team was in 1859, when an expedition was sent to the spot where the vessels were last seen, only to discover a small boat, and a skeleton of a crew member, who likely had abandoned ship.

In 2014, the wreck of the “Erebus” was found, and its bell recovered, while the “Terror” was found two years later.

In 2019, underwater cameras were sent into HMS “Terror”, and images of the officers’ rooms, with plates and glass bottles were discovered. Future expeditions hope to uncover more details about this tragic story.


Parks Canada Guided Tour Inside HMS Terror
https://youtu.be/OxyTZ3F7mkA

Wrecks of HMS Erebus and HMS Terror National Historic Site
https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/lhn-nhs/nu/epaveswrecks
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Old 22-03-2022, 05:00   #9
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

SS "Thistlegorn", 1941

In the early 1950s, famous undersea explorer Jacques Cousteau was diving in the Red Sea. He had heard stories of a shipwreck nearby and with the help of local fishermen located the site. Cousteau found it was packed with armaments, vehicles and weapons of war and he recovered a motorbike, the safe and the ship’s bell from the wreck. Cousteau had discovered the remains of the steamship "Thistlegorn".

Classed as an armed freighter, Thistlegorn was built in Sunderland in 1940. She had been collecting steel and aircraft parts from the US, grain from Argentina and rum from the West Indies. In June 1941, the vessel set sail bound for Alexandria in Egypt, carrying motorbikes, guns, armoured cars and train locomotives. But, on 6 October, German planes targeted the ship and bombed it near Ras Muhammad, Egypt, in the Red Sea.

Nine crew members were lost as the ship sank, although most were rescued. In the 1990s, Sharm el Sheik was developed as a tourist resort and the wreck became an exploration ground for scuba divers. Huge amounts of cargo can still be seen in situ making for a fascinating visit – the wreck is often tipped as one of the best diving sites in the world.

More ➥ https://thethistlegormproject.com/
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Old 22-04-2022, 03:43   #10
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

Not a ship, but ...
There’s a Massive Antarctic Exploration Vehicle Lost Somewhere at the Bottom of the World
Last seen in 1958, it was designed to travel 5000 miles and self-sustain for an entire year.

The mighty Snow Cruiser was found in 1946 by a U.S. Navy expedition, at which point it supposedly only needed air in its tires and a little tune-up to run. In 1958, the behemoth was again uncovered by chance—the international team that spotted its signal poles dug through feet of snow and discovered its weatherproofing had held up and the interior was just as the original crew had left it, cigarette butts and all. Seeing as it definitely wasn't going anywhere now, they left. That was the last time anyone saw it.

Antarctica's ice is forever shifting, and several years after that final Snow Cruiser sighting, a large chunk of the Ross Ice Shelf broke off near where it had been parked. Whether the vehicle is still entombed on the landbound side or lost at sea is unknown. Ironically, Poulter's belief that the Antarctic could be seen by car wasn't totally off base—in 2017, Hyundai sent a Santa Fe crossover to the South Pole as a publicity stunt.

More ➥ https://www.thedrive.com/news/33433/...m-of-the-world




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Old 22-04-2022, 03:51   #11
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

I’ve dove a couple hundred of the Great Lakes 5,000 wrecks. Some from war of 1812 like the Surge and Hamilton are in pristine condition. North Atlantic wrecks break your heart. Wrecks like the Andrea Doria were just beautiful boats now first class is sliding off the wreck.
The Empress of Ireland in the St.Lawrence is near Rimouski across the river from Quebec City. Great loss of passenger life than the Titanic with some 600 Dead still in the silt at the bottom of the staircases

We found the Enterprise in Lake Simcoe. The only twin engine steam boat on the lake.
Most of the model Avro Arrows have been found in Lake Ontario. Avro was testing different dihedral on glide sacrificing each test to thelake.
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Old 22-04-2022, 04:15   #12
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

AVRO CANADA CF-105 ARROW ~ CANADA AVIATION AND SPACE MUSEUM
The CF-105 Arrow was a delta-winged interceptor aircraft, designed and built by A.V. Roe (Avro) Canada as the culmination of a series of design studies that originally began in 1953. The CF-105 design was capable of near-Mach 2 speeds at altitudes in excess of 15,250 meters (50,000 feet).
https://documents.techno-science.ca/...5Arrownose.pdf

“After decades of failed searches, the 'holy grail' of Avro Arrow artifacts uncovered at the bottom of Lake Ontario”
https://nationalpost.com/news/canada...f-lake-ontario

From the Avro Arrow to the Gimli Glider
News Article | From the Avro Arrow to the Gimli Glider
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Old 29-04-2022, 04:20   #13
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

Revolutionary find: 19 cannons in river likely sunk in 1779
A warehouse along the Savannah River is holding historical treasures that evidence suggests remained lost for more than 240 years — a cache of 19 cannons that researchers suspect came from British ships scuttled to the river bottom during the American Revolution. Researchers suspect the cannons found in the river came from the British ship HMS “Savannah”, and possibly a second ship scuttled at the same time, the HMS “Venus”.
More ➥ https://phys.org/news/2022-04-revolu...iver-sunk.html




See also:
“Archaeologists recover cannon from sunken Confederate ship [CSS Georgia]”
https://phys.org/news/2015-09-archeo...nfederate.html
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Old 29-04-2022, 04:54   #14
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

Here's an article about a wreck I've been trying to find for many years. Lake Michigan is fickle, things near shore get buried in the sand, then uncovered.

My Great-great-grandfather was the captain.

http://www.whitelakeareahistoricalso...L.J.Conway.pdf
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Old 29-04-2022, 17:16   #15
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Re: Shipwreck discoveries

kayakerChuck,

I couldn't get your link to work. Could you please post one again? I'm thinking the family connection adds fascination.

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