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Old 16-03-2022, 01:06   #1
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Join Date: May 2011
Location: Philippines
Boat: custom 42' catamaran
Posts: 280
catamaran in the Philippines

My boat, the S/V Mistral is registered in the USA with the USCG NVDC Output Packet - Official Number 1263459, is a 42 foot long sailing catamaran and 20 feet wide and currently draws under three feet of water. It weighs about 4.5 tons according to the designer / builder, Nigel Roberts. It is constructed primarily of wood with fiberglass on the lower portions and two part epoxy paint on the upper portions. It was built here in the Philippines. It has four queen berths, each with a large screened hatch - with the two aft berths currently being used for storage - and like most catamarans it has lots of storage all over the boat. The hulls are tied together by three large box beams: the forward box beam is the water tank (about 500 liters); the center box beam is the diesel tank (about 500 liters); and, the aft box beam is the transom with four large hatches for storage - and under the removable floorboards is the tie rod for the rudders. The two bows do not communicate with the hulls and can be used for a large amount of storage although I currently have them filled with empty sealed plastic containers for floatation. The foredeck has four large hatches which cover storage for anchoring and sailing equipment - with the center having the bow roller, manual anchor winch, and large bollard. The raised portion of the foredeck contains the two forward berths. Closed off from the forward berths is a large spacious bridge-deck salon which contains spacious "U" shaped seating area and a fixed table - seating is on the water tank and two storage areas (on large cushions that can be used as beds). The ends of the "U" butt against two bars: starboard is storage and port is the refrigerator/small freezer. On the other side of the bars are two short stairwells that lead down into the hulls. On the other side of the stairwells is the diesel tank (raised so that if water comes over the transom it will stay in the large covered cockpit and not enter the salon) with a door leading to the cockpit. To starboard is the helm station with a large window so one can sit while steering and see out the forward windows, and there is a large hatch above the helm station so one can stand and look out directly - all large hatches have a polycarbonate insert so one can see out (up). Just forward of the helm station on the inside of the side deck is the start of the quarter inch stainless safety cable that runs in a “U” shape around the raised part of the foredeck and back down the other side deck. The main fuse panel is also located here inside the salon. On the port side there is an enclosed shower and toilet* (no holding tank). Aft of the diesel tank is the covered cockpit with seating and removable table/chairs. Aft of the transom which has a small central anchor roller and bollard, is a landing platform** which is currently supporting the tender on one side (the wood tender may need some work). There is a solar platform on top of the davits that currently house four 60 watt solar panels. The roof has two smaller hatches which provide airflow for the salon*** and has small side gutters**** that assist in the collection of rainwater, The mast is above the diesel tank box beam and is supported by it. The mast is 42 feet high and is supported by a forestay and a backstay - both with bridles; there are two shrouds on each side, one going to the top of the mast and the other set lower (no spreaders are used). The aft part of the roof on each side supports a 250 watt solar panel (two panels).*I had always intended to install a small C-Head composting toilet in each hull near the forward berths, but have never needed them – this will likely be required if one goes to a high end marina instead of anchoring or mooring.**I have considered extending the landing platform to the end of the swim steps to make a more solid support for the tender.***A third small hatch is needed for the cockpit shower: first to provide airflow; second to provide the ability to support a 20 liter black colored water container which is upside down so a valve and shower head can be mounted in the lid and hot (solar) showers taken. I made one that worked well but I had to hoist it above the foredeck with the halyard. ****The gutters are too small and need to be made much bigger to capture more of the heavy rainfall that currently runs off the side of the roof.

At the forward end of the starboard hull there is a hanging locker for clothes and then a space where the C-Head would likely fit. A short stairwell leads up to the owners berth flanked by storage on both sides; then more storage and a work bench with a vise and storage for tools and repair stuff; then the stairwell leading up to the salon; with more storage on the other side of the stairwell, storage or the small 2hp two stroke outboard, a pair of new Lewmar 40 self-tailing winches (to replace the old Lewmar 30 winches), and a 220 VAC outlet fed by a 2000 watt inverter. Going up is the aft berth with the stairs currently stored there; under the berth is the battery bank - currently with only two 100 ah sealed batteries, but could contain at least four and possibly six along with the solar controller and the big inverter. There is also a 12 VDC trickle charger and a backup if shore power is available. On the side deck starting at the bow there is a sturdy stainless “U” bolt with chain plate backed up by a bollard and flanked by a stainless chafing guard on the inside. The bow section has stainless railing on both sides and on the outside it continues down to the swim steps; and on the deck level there is an embedded stainless ring, a centered larger bollard, an aft bollard, and there was a stainless handhold. The VHF antenna is near the stern.

At the forward end of the port hull there is a hanging locker for clothes and then a space where the C-Head would likely fit. There is a circuit breaker for the shore power extension cord. A short stairwell leads up to the guest berth flanked by storage on both sides; then more storage and the outlet for the water tank and a pump for the cockpit shower; and then a sink, counter, and two burner stove and storage for food and kitchen stuff; then the stairwell leading up to the salon; with more storage on the other side of the stairwell and the outlet for the diesel tank. Going up (the stairs are in place) is the aft port berth now used mostly for storage, and under the berth is a relatively new (less than 800 hours) Beta 38 marine engine and transmission with a maintenance free starter battery that can be added to the battery bank or not via a switch (which can be replaced with a seventh 100 ah maintenance free solar battery for a combined 700 ah power reserve). Currently the only through hull valve is located there for the inlet for cooling water">engine cooling water. The propane tank is mounted on the rear of the transom. On the side deck starting at the bow there is a sturdy stainless “U” bolt with chain plate backed up by a bollard and flanked by a stainless chafing guard on the inside. The bow section has stainless railing on both sides and on the outside it continues down to the swim steps; and on the deck level there is an embedded stainless ring, a centered larger bollard, an aft bollard, and there was a stainless handhold. Both hulls terminate in a swim step with a swim ladder attachment.

There are four anchors: a large and small Bruegel, a stainless Danforth, and, a stainless fisherman - all were originally set up to have twelve meters of chain and then rope - with a light and a heavy nylon bridle available. I also have an all chain option with around 150 feet of 5/16 inch high strength chain which fits the bow winch better. There are two sails: the big 100% jib and the storm jib - both of which hank on to the forestay. There is no mainsail although one could be added by running a cable from the top of the mast to the bottom and hanking on a loose foot main. Not being an experienced sailor (I have only a compass, charts, and depth sounder for navigation as I am a coastal sailor and have never been out of the sight of land – one island ahead and one behind), I could only get the boat to reach, close reach, or broad reach - it doesn't like to sail dead downwind because there is nothing to keep the jib stay down. I purchased a bunch of stainless bar stock to fabricate a bow protector with tie down points to eliminate this problem but stopped sailing before it was made and installed. Another possible solution was to buy a surplus Chicom parachute with all the lines still attached and just connect one side to the foredeck bollard and hoist the other side with the halyard - sort of an inexpensive and simple spinnaker,

There is also an AirLine hooka (surface supplied air to a depth of 60 feet for two) and some dive equipment on the boat. There are also three VHF radios, two handheld and one fixed near the helm station that has GPS and an AIS receiver. There is also a Hummingbird depth sounder built into the starboard hull near the bow. There is a large stainless gas grill (Magna?) in aft storage and a small backup gas grill for use when the main propane tank is out. There are also two swim ladders and a small fire and waterproof safe.

I am currently living on the boat with my wife and our fur baby, and it has been a houseboat for several years now - ever since I got my pacemaker - tied to the pier with shore power and freshwater at Zeke's Marina in Danao, Cebu. The boat has survived four major typhoons now, Sendong and Yolanda (Haiyan) in Tombobo Bay; Ruby and Odette (Rai) here in Danao/Carmen with the last one giving my wife some lasting trauma which has increased her desire to move to the USA. Skilled labor is available here at about $20 USD per day, but you may need to do your own design and supervision of the workers for anything unusual. Getting the hulls cleaned and repainted with anti-fouling is a common task here and this work is done on the other side of the pier I am tied to so the boat can be moved with ropes only. I would like to get $150,000 for it so I can buy a small house and car when I return to the US. I am willing to negotiate. Stay safe. Have a good day.
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Old 20-03-2022, 19:22   #2
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Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Vietnam
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Posts: 11
Re: catamaran in the Philippines

Interesting... can you provide info on the actual drawings and sail plan... who drew your plans? You posted a lot of text and might be best to bullet point items. You have just 1 Beta 38 auxiliary diesel? From photos it looms like your mast is stepped really far to the aft.



I am in VN and Cebu is a short hop away.


Thanks in advance for your reply,


VNCruzer
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Old 20-03-2022, 20:24   #3
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

Hi VNCruzer! I haven't been back to Vietnam since my tour there during the War. As far as I know there are no plans, the designer/builder had issues with people stealing his designs and building knock-offs so he works from templates. There is no sailplan, there is only the 100% headsail which hanks onto the outer forestay; and a smaller one for heavy wind conditions which I generally do not sail in - which is why the mast is set so far back. The builder hates booms so there is no mainsail. A cable could be run vertically at the back of the mast and a small loosefoot 'main' could be added - I have thought about this but not done it. Yes, it only has one engine in the port hull, the battery bank is in the other hull. Engines are really expensive, although I have toyed with the idea of dumping the rig and adding an engine - haven't done that either. Doing the description with bullet points would make a very long document - and would probably grow as I would be tempted to add more smaller points. Thanks for your interest. Stay safe. Have a good day.
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Old 30-04-2022, 10:30   #4
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

Bruce, still on the market? I will likely be in Cebu by July 2022 and would love to see her.

/mark richards
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Old 30-04-2022, 16:44   #5
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

Hi Mark! Thank you for your response. Yes, still on the market. Are you familiar with Cebu and do you need transportation? If you have a pinay with local knowledge, bus transport is cheap and easy. I can provide a cell number you can text when you are nearby and provide detailed instructions once you are in the local area if you are not familiar with the Danao / Carmen area. Let me know if you need assistance with your local travel arrangements. Stay safe. Have a good day.
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Old 01-05-2022, 06:25   #6
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

150K for a plywood boat with no sail plan…..sure!
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Old 05-05-2022, 19:10   #7
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

First, it is not 'a boat' it is the family home for over a decade; it has brought us through four serious typhoons - the last of which caused damage to the concrete homes of two in-laws, one seriously - while our home had only minor issues. Second. a 'plywood' boat is easy for a new owner to customize at relativley little expense. Third, I assume that a new owner will likely want to re-rig the catamaran to better fit their sailing style - I am primarily a coastal sailor, when I could still sail; a new rig will require an updated sail plan in any event. Fourth, I presume that you did not clearly understand the phrase "I am willing to negotiate." Have a good day.
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Old 07-05-2022, 14:31   #8
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

There’s no benefit to getting defensive. We used to have a GRP/Plywood multihull and the reality is they can be great boats or they can be homebuilds that break apart in rough seas due to poor build or design. Same is true of metal or fiberglass.

The reality is a custom boat without plans is going to raise questions and scrutiny from any reasonable buyer. Doesn’t mean it’s bad - it could be better built than a production boat, but details matter. What kind of resin? What kind of plywood? Was the attachment and engineering of major structures correct?

Great boats can be built out of almost any reasonable material - just like houses. The fact that your relatives’ concrete homes were damaged in a cyclone speaks more to their design and/or construction than materials.

Perhaps consider providing more details of construction and design to prospective buyers of a boat that appears well cared for and maintained.
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Old 08-05-2022, 06:46   #9
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

1.When was it built
2.Where built in PI, what yard and yard contact info.
3. Contact info of boat designer

4. When was last survey
5. What yard hauled it last

6. Are you the original owner, if not, can you provide contact info from seller you purchased from.
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Old 11-10-2022, 19:36   #10
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

OK, massnspace was apparently right about the price as there has been little activity. I am now willing to start negotiations on the price at $75,000 USD. While I am happy living on my catamaran, my wife wants to travel, if not here with the boat then in the USA by car - and I did promise that we would do this. Another big reason to sell the boat and return to the USA is that my pacemaker is going to need a new battery soon - and this is not something that I can do myself. Have a good day.
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Old 11-10-2022, 20:30   #11
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

What year was it built?
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Old 11-10-2022, 23:02   #12
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

The builder launched it in 2011 while I was traveling in order to start another catamaran - and mostly stopped working on it as his workers 'felt queasy'. In 2012 we moved aboard part time and I was working on it myself - not my skill sets though. I hired others to help and eventually got it ready to sail. We left Tambobo Bay where it was built and sailed to the Cebu yacht club where we stayed for a while. Later we went up the coast to Zeke's Marina (aka Pinoy Boat Yard) in Danao/Carmen where we are now. Getting a pacemaker brought the sailing to a standstill so we are currently a houseboat tied to a dock. Too much information? Have a good day.
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Old 04-12-2022, 21:39   #13
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

Bruce626,


Im coming there - to Carmen, Zekes, in Jan 23. Maybe we can meet - I do not know my way around there. Will be shopping another boat - which may be next door to you. I'm guessing there are other -for sale- boats there too.


BTY?? WHERE can I find a survey person there? I'm looking at a Southerly 14 at Zekes, has RED mast and boom, you cant miss it. REALLY would like professional help with a survey!


Tim
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Old 04-12-2022, 23:35   #14
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Re: catamaran in the Philippines

Hi Tim! Yes, the Weiss World was tied next to me for some years, they just moved it closer to the bar a couple of weeks ago. I would guess that you are going to arrive at the Mactan airport and get local accommodations at a pension house for your stay. From there you can get a taxi or jeepney to the North Bus Terminal and get a bus going north - tell the conductor to drop you off at the Republic Dry Dock and just walk down the dirt road to the entrance gate. Tell the guard you are going to Zeke's and walk over to the bar - you will see the Weiss World on the way to the bar. I don't know of any local surveyors here but perhaps Zeke, Nelson, or your broker can take care of that. If you are looking for me, I am on the catamaran at the end of the pier. Have a safe trip.
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Old 05-12-2022, 02:00   #15
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catamaran in the Philippines

I think either I or local mechanic did a re power of Weiss world way back in time, does it have a Yanmar with a down angle gearbox and a max prop?
Nope, not a down angle gearbox, it was initially a volvo Penta and volvo gearbox and the new engine and down angle gearbox put the front of the Yanmar too low so a new straight gearbox was bought and the engine bed raised by 5”.... maybe more. Nice boat, swing keel from memory..... it’s been a while.
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