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Old 11-04-2019, 01:56   #61
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SaltedEgg View Post
Thank you! If needed, could I put new male lead on to match whatever input is available?
No, That one runs on 240 volts only,,

You buy a transformer with what ever power you have available,
Then the outlet, Or GPO's are what ever you want to run on it, EG, 110 volts,

Fleabay.com, From china with free delivery, Will get what you want or need cheaply.
Dont buy the cheapest, Its crap, scroll down the page till you find what you need and click on that,
That will give you links to the same gear but cheaper,

I have a 5000 Watt, 240 volt, pure sine wave Invertor connected direct to my 12 volt batterys, that runs my 240 Volt gear,
That cost me $500-00 delivered,
Its totally off grid,

You would need an Invertor to run 110 Volts, They do make them,
Make sure its a Pure Sine Wave Invertor,
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Old 11-04-2019, 02:54   #62
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

Thank you, Mr. B! And everyone else who took time to help me out. I know how to move forward in the immediate future.. but I'll be back for more knowledge soon.

Take care everyone!
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Old 11-04-2019, 04:20   #63
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

Tools designed to run off DC - cordless! - can be used when no shore power is available, very convenient for a boat.

Nearly all mfg sell a "car charger" for their batteries. Given a "world universal" charger as I originally recommended, can then use in any future location, rather than replacing the transformer for every new location with a different standard - many countries even have different mains in different regions..

Ryobi's One+ 18V line in particular gives great flexibility if available there, not professional level but good enough, and not expensive. Portable fans, work lights, vacuum cleaner air compressor etc as well as many dozens of power tool types.

Have kept the same battery system for decades and committed to maintain it in future.

Make a great LI 9Ah battery very high quality.

https://images.homedepot-static.com/...20-64_1000.jpg
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Old 11-04-2019, 04:27   #64
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

And of course corded tools can be run off a suitable inverter, which also is powered from your House bank, in turn charged by that universal charger **if** shore power is available, but neither of these solutions requires it..

The transformer idea is **only** useful when shore power is available that matches its input specs.

AFAIK they don't make universal ones, or if they do they'd be **very** expensive.
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Old 11-04-2019, 06:02   #65
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

Quote:
Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
Tools designed to run off DC - cordless! - can be used when no shore power is available, very convenient for a boat.

Nearly all mfg sell a "car charger" for their batteries. Given a "world universal" charger as I originally recommended, can then use in any future location, rather than replacing the transformer for every new location with a different standard - many countries even have different mains in different regions..

Ryobi's One+ 18V line in particular gives great flexibility if available there, not professional level but good enough, and not expensive. Portable fans, work lights, vacuum cleaner air compressor etc as well as many dozens of power tool types.

Have kept the same battery system for decades and committed to maintain it in future.

Make a great LI 9Ah battery very high quality.

https://images.homedepot-static.com/...20-64_1000.jpg
He is on the hard and has shore power, Not shore what voltage he has there,

He has a heap of 110 volt power tools already, he dont need cordless gear,

He just needs some thing to convert what he has at the yard to run his 110 Volt gear,
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Old 11-04-2019, 09:46   #66
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

Directly responding to this
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaltedEgg View Post
I need to do a lot more research on 12v/18v/20v power tools. In Malaysia there are lots of Bosch power tools, and a decent amount of Makita and DeWalt. Any advice on which brands and models?
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaltedEgg View Post
Mabruteam mentioned getting a step down converter for the power tools at Radio Shack. Being able to use the 110v tool in Thailand would be a massive stress relief. Can anyone give advice on this? Are the step down converters that easy to come across?

I'd very much like to do some work on the hull while she is on the hard in Thailand before sailing her back to Malaysia. Being able to use the power tools currently on the boat is my dream. A cheap converter that allows me to use the 110v power tools feel like a fantasy.
The term "converter" is IMO properly used only for DC-DC (voltage only) conversion, when not specifically a charger for batteries.

Going from DC - your battery storage bank - to AC, "mains style" power like your 110V corded tools need, is called an **inverter**.

No connection to shore power required, and you can use that inverter anywhere in the world. Recharging your bank can be from solar or shore power anywhere in the world using the universal AC charger discussed above.

But going that way (110V tools from an inverter) will use lots more power overall than converting to cordless tools and recharging their batteries as discussed above.

Now, completely separate topic, plugging your corded tools directly into Thai (or Malay or Philippine etc) **shore** power will require a **transformer**, and later on, you'd need a separate one for each "flavour" of shore power - and none of those transformers do you any good when you are away from shore power.

Hope that helps.
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Old 13-04-2019, 05:19   #67
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

Quote:
Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
Directly responding to this



The term "converter" is IMO properly used only for DC-DC (voltage only) conversion, when not specifically a charger for batteries.

Going from DC - your battery storage bank - to AC, "mains style" power like your 110V corded tools need, is called an **inverter**.

No connection to shore power required, and you can use that inverter anywhere in the world. Recharging your bank can be from solar or shore power anywhere in the world using the universal AC charger discussed above.

But going that way (110V tools from an inverter) will use lots more power overall than converting to cordless tools and recharging their batteries as discussed above.

Now, completely separate topic, plugging your corded tools directly into Thai (or Malay or Philippine etc) **shore** power will require a **transformer**, and later on, you'd need a separate one for each "flavour" of shore power - and none of those transformers do you any good when you are away from shore power.

Hope that helps.

I would venture to state that power tool usage on a cruising boat is so insignificant the savings using cordless vs corded tools is a rounding error compared to overall power consumption. This compared to the ROI on the cost of corded vs cordless, especially if corded is already owned, makes cordless tools way too expensive. (And I love my cordless drill/driver)



A 900W? drill runs an hour a month? Running a corded model from an inverter equates to what? 1100Whr vs 1050Whr for a cordless model? Yes, a rounding error.
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Old 13-04-2019, 07:32   #68
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

A "converter" is a device that converts high voltage AC to low voltage DC as opposed to an "inverter" which converts low voltage DC to high voltage AC.

Nobody uses converters anymore on new boats but on older boats they are still around.
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Old 13-04-2019, 10:25   #69
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

I only see the term used that way in the US-based RV / camper industry. These days decent quality units have all the equivalent features of modern "charger" in addition to their traditional "power supply" functionality.

A more precise term for the latter is also "rectifier".

All three are AC to DC of course.

These days, as I said, best for clarity to reserve the use of "converter" to voltage-only conversion, in the DC-DC realm, as in boost converters, buck converters and buck–boost converter for those that swing both ways.

DC-DC chargers include such converter functionality, as do solar MPPT controllers, their functionality is more specialised, but of course their are crossover usages

https://www.victronenergy.com/dc-dc-...v-24v-48v-110v.
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Old 13-04-2019, 11:02   #70
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

Quote:
Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
I only see the term used that way in the US-based RV / camper industry. These days decent quality units have all the equivalent features of modern "charger" in addition to their traditional "power supply" functionality.

A more precise term for the latter is also "rectifier".

All three are AC to DC of course.

These days, as I said, best for clarity to reserve the use of "converter" to voltage-only conversion, in the DC-DC realm, as in boost converters, buck converters and buck–boost converter for those that swing both ways.

DC-DC chargers include such converter functionality, as do solar MPPT controllers, their functionality is more specialised, but of course their are crossover usages

https://www.victronenergy.com/dc-dc-...v-24v-48v-110v.
I'm sorry John but it is irrelevant how you think for how the rest of the world names things. A converter is 120V or 230V AC to 12V or 24V DC. It has always been that and has been used on boats for a long, long time. The reason that "DC-DC converters" are called that, instead of just "converters" is to distinguish them from converters that are AC to DC.

For modern equipment on boats we now talk about battery chargers, inverters and DC-DC converters. When we rip old tech out of old boats, we encounter the obsolete converters, mostly big heavy transformers with diodes with heat sinks bolted on top. We're not going to change the name of DC-DC converters into just converters, sorry mate
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Old 13-04-2019, 14:24   #71
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

Left one is a Transformer, 240 volts AC to 110 volts, AC, Brand new,

Right one is an Invertor, 12 volts, DC to 240 volts, AC,
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Old 10-05-2019, 14:34   #72
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

I will barge in on this thread with my question for the experts. I think the answer is the Victron Isolation transformer.

I have a European built Fountaine Pajot Catamaran with the 110v option. Where I dock in the Caribbean only has 220v 32amp for dock supply. I want to power up my air conditioning and other accessories from the dock 220v.

Will the Victron Isolation Transformer take the dock 220v and allow me to plug into my 110 volt boat? Was not clear to me from the Victron website where it will step down or would I also need the Victron autotransformer?
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Old 28-06-2019, 07:08   #73
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

Most power transformers have separate primary and secondary windings and are by default isolated.

All that is needed is a 2:1 step down transformer (220 to 110, or 240 to 120)

https://www.ebay.com/itm/173862945827
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Old 28-06-2019, 07:42   #74
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

In my opinion adding complicated equipments on boats is no longer necessary Most of the actual appliances are dual voltage, refrigerators are 115/230AC V and DC 12/24v, air conditioning for small boats also could operate on solar, DC 12v 21amps or with a dual voltage AC/DC power supply, we took a video of that unit running all day on a single battery, the only equipment you need on inverter is your microwave.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaltedEgg View Post
Hey all,

I just bought a Westsail 32 that is wired for 110v. I purchased her in Thailand and plan to do some bottom work there before sailing her back to Malaysia, where I live and work, for a year. The marina in Malaysia that she will be at gets very little breeze so I'll be running an air conditioner, plus other electronics for the year. After that year, I plan to cruise for 2 years in the pacific living on the hook the whole time. Currently, there are many 110v power tools aboard such as grinders, drills, sanders, etc. that I'd like to use. My questions are:

What are your initial thoughts?

Should I get a step down transformer. If so, where do I start?

Should I rewire her to take 220v? Thoughts on power tools?

Bring on the wisdom
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Old 28-06-2019, 07:59   #75
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Re: 220v to 110v. Where do I start?

The simplest way in my opinion, is purchase a good 240-120 transformer. It can be placed on the dock or on deck or, with some wiring, in the boat. I actually bought a transformer which can go either way and has some other conversions possible by switching some jumper plugs. Keep this device dry.

Transformers will be available local for very little.

You need a shore power cord for 240v.

You plug the transformer into the 240 shore power then connect the boat's 120 shore power connection to the transformer's 120 output.

You keep all the boat's wiring and outlets and 120 equipment untouched.

You will then have to deal with the consequence of 50hz vs 60hz (the 240 will be 50hz or 50 cycles, not 60hz as 120 usually is). Most devices onboard the boat will tolerate this change, but some will run slower. My microwave was noisy and we just got rid of it.

A 240v air conditioner can be run directly off the shore power cord. Ours is on deck and we used a Y connector in the shore power cord before it goes into the transformer.

If you wish to run some 240v equipment you buy in Asia then get an extension cord with a multiple outlet end and run it in through the companionway or, for small devices which do not support multiple voltages (most do) you get a small 240v inverter which runs off your 12 volt system.

We bought our first 1500watt inverter in Tahiti, still have it, but got a good one in Hong Kong in 2004, and still have that. Now we are back in 120 land and we don't use either of them.
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