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Old 11-12-2020, 07:13   #46
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Re: wire lifelines versus tubed rails

The windage is significant. 60 feet of 1" OD tubing is 5 square feet of windage, as much as 2-3 jerry cans. Matters to some sailors on some boats.



The load on the stanchions is also much greater than with cable if a wave comes over the bow.
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Old 12-12-2020, 03:20   #47
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Re: wire lifelines versus tubed rails

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Originally Posted by OrangeCrush View Post
Do you mean bedding the stanchion tubes in the bases or the bedding the rails in a fitting at the top? What would you use instead of non-hardening sealant?
I meant bedding the stantion tubes in the base sockets. Doing it again, I would use a product like Sikaflex 292
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Old 12-12-2020, 03:35   #48
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Re: wire lifelines versus tubed rails

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Originally Posted by Jammer View Post
The windage is significant. 60 feet of 1" OD tubing is 5 square feet of windage, as much as 2-3 jerry cans. Matters to some sailors on some boats.

The load on the stanchions is also much greater than with cable if a wave comes over the bow.
I suspect the windage would be very important to a serious racer, but most cruisers I've seen during our trade wind circumnavigation would carry a lot more windage on deck in the way of dinghies, fuel and or water drums, kyaks, fenders, biminis, dodgers etc etc.

Load on stanchions from waves has not been a problem with Risky, although with with her low freeboard she is seriously wet. This includes an inversion! She is Aluminium though with stanchion bases welded to her 3mm decks.
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Old 14-12-2020, 23:48   #49
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Re: wire lifelines versus tubed rails

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Originally Posted by skipgundlach View Post
We bought a boat with 24" stanchions and wire lines.

That height was just perfect for my 6-4 frame to trip over, not be restrained, so much.

So I replaced them with SS tubing throughout, tying the stern segment in with the arch we installed (had the fabricator make stubs for the tubing to go over at 15 and 30 inches).

For our 90' feet of length, total, for tubing and all the Sea Dog fittings (including the hard to find + rather than T center tees, and the fork-end fittings to go on the half-chain on the pulpit) was the best right-at-a-boat-buck we've ever spent.

I bent the hull curvature by just fixing one end of the either 20' or 24' sticks and pushing on the other until the resultant bow became the shape of the hull. Too much? Put both ends on something stable, and push on the middle until you reduce the curve as needed. At that length, the tubing bends easily.

I made the top rails solid (from pulpit to gate and from arch to gate), and used a metal hole saw to drill out the proper dimensions on the intermediate rails, yielding the right sized half-moon to engage the stanchion piece so it couldn't turn (recall curvature of the hull; you want it to stay in place).

Once everything was fitted, I drilled out the place where a set screw would normally engage, and used SS pop rivets to secure it all; the stanchion bases I drilled out a 1/4-20 engagement for a short machine screw, so they could be removed if needed, but still were secure (vs set screws which would not take a strong lift to dislodge, whether at tees or corners).

Looks great, better security, and doesn't break the bank.

The railing pix start on the second page...
Pictures: Flying Pig Early Refit + Projects/Early_Major_Alterations_Work/07-05to7-19-05
Skip,

How did you make the fiberglass post stanchion bases that insert into the stanchions? How strong is the post to fiberglass pad connection that is glued/glassed to the deck, is that the weak link?
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Old 15-12-2020, 04:20   #50
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Re: wire lifelines versus tubed rails

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Originally Posted by BigBeakie View Post
Skip,

How did you make the fiberglass post stanchion bases that insert into the stanchions? How strong is the post to fiberglass pad connection that is glued/glassed to the deck, is that the weak link?
On a Morgan 46x, the SS stanchion bases are through-bolted through the deck, which is solid fiberglass.

I'd have to dig through my pictures to be sure, but I believe it's also cored at that point (marine plywood), and they all have backing fender washers or plates (same lack of clear memory).

Our stanchion bases are like shown here:
Pictures: Flying Pig Early Refit + Projects/Early_Major_Alterations_Work/07-05to7-19-05

Continuation of that project is in the next gallery:
Pictures: Flying Pig Early Refit + Projects/Early_Major_Alterations_Work/07-20to7-30-05

If your installation has the (maybe solid?) shaft going through the deck, I don't know how I'd approach that, unless you were keeping those (our original stanchions were sturdier than our tubing, but as noted, too short; in retrospect, I would probably have been well served to have hunted some round bar stock as more robust)...

Hope that helped...
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