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Old 30-12-2020, 09:29   #1
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Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Happy Holidays to all.



Was in a series of marathon meetings in the peanut gallery, so I sketched this hazard plan out recently.



Any thoughts on ways to improve this?

Shoot holes in my thought processes, please?


(items in red are things I need to keep working on or acquire and practice with)



-Gene
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File Type: pdf hazards.pdf (107.5 KB, 306 views)
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Old 30-12-2020, 09:42   #2
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Just a quick comment relating to loss of rig. You should have onboard the means to cut away standing rigging. If you are dismasted in a seaway you may need to cut stays/shrouds to either get spars back aboard or to set them free so they don't hole the hull.
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Old 30-12-2020, 10:07   #3
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Risk of collision: Hand bearing compass
Overboard: Carry whistle, strobe, personal rescue beacon, tow a long line
Fire: Smoke alarms, propane solenoid, pressurized hose reel, combustible gas detector.
Injury: Well stocked medicine kit, adequate first aid and wound dressing for large lacerations and burns not just the bandaids and alka seltzer that come in small first aid kits.

Many boats carry an emergency tiller.

Many smaller boats but few larger boats have a manual bilge pump that can be operated from the helm.
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Old 30-12-2020, 11:37   #4
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

In the 21st century, I am hard pressed to see why anyone should sail into heavy weather. An Iridium GO and a weather program will show you GFS forecasts 7-10. For a subscription to Predict Wind Pro, you can get the European model.
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Old 30-12-2020, 11:50   #5
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

I have an edson 1 gal/stroke manual bilge pump with 15 feet of hose so I can stay at the helm and pump in addition to the electric bilge pump.
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Old 30-12-2020, 11:55   #6
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snore View Post
In the 21st century, I am hard pressed to see why anyone should sail into heavy weather. An Iridium GO and a weather program will show you GFS forecasts 7-10. For a subscription to Predict Wind Pro, you can get the European model.

Good point and concur when it comes to day sailing and coastal jaunts.


However, I plan on doing an Atlantic crossing next season, and dear boat is a fat slow one. (Shannon) There's just no way I could dodge a front. From everything I've read, it's impractical to attempt to outrun / dodge a storm. (though there are strategies to attempt to get on the softer side of things, sometimes)



I recognize that heavy weather is by far the exception. I just want to be prepared for the 5% of time I'm in it during a crossing where I can't avoid it.
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Old 30-12-2020, 12:01   #7
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumbs Up View Post
Risk of collision: Hand bearing compass
Overboard: Carry whistle, strobe, personal rescue beacon, tow a long line
Fire: Smoke alarms, propane solenoid, pressurized hose reel, combustible gas detector.
Injury: Well stocked medicine kit, adequate first aid and wound dressing for large lacerations and burns not just the bandaids and alka seltzer that come in small first aid kits.

Many boats carry an emergency tiller.

Many smaller boats but few larger boats have a manual bilge pump that can be operated from the helm.

Awesome! Thank you. I have a whistle and strobe on my vest/harness. Not sure about a rescue beacon though. Is it like an epirb? I'll be alone, so unless it can summon help the same as an epirb, my empty boat isn't turning around for me.



-I have CO and smoke alarms. I'll add those to the list. I have solenoids, but I also physically turn off the gas at the bottle after each time I cook. overkill, I know, but I cannot see a solenoid nor have 100% confidence it works.



-Injury - check! I have goodies you mentioned. Including a medical grade skin staple gun. Not sure I could use it unless I shoot some gin first. (just kidding, I know that thins the blood)


My vessel has a stern hung rudder. So any number of things will double as a tiller as long as it can go into the square hole in the head of the rudder. (boat hooks, 2 x 4, etc. I want to test a few of those actually.



I have a manual bilge pump at the helm. I can sit and pump and hand steer. Not sure for how long, though. And I have two bilge pump handles with tethers. I figure in the event I'm forced to use them, things may be rough and don't want them getting away from me.



THANK YOU for your reply.
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Old 30-12-2020, 12:03   #8
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

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Originally Posted by bensolomon View Post
I have an edson 1 gal/stroke manual bilge pump with 15 feet of hose so I can stay at the helm and pump in addition to the electric bilge pump.

Same set up. Mine is a whale.



I'm also trying to figure out how to install a "T" juncture at the engine intake so I can use the engine to intake water from the bilge as a 3rd option. last option ?
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Old 30-12-2020, 12:08   #9
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArmySailor View Post
Good point and concur when it comes to day sailing and coastal jaunts.


However, I plan on doing an Atlantic crossing next season, and dear boat is a fat slow one. (Shannon) There's just no way I could dodge a front. From everything I've read, it's impractical to attempt to outrun / dodge a storm. (though there are strategies to attempt to get on the softer side of things, sometimes)



I recognize that heavy weather is by far the exception. I just want to be prepared for the 5% of time I'm in it during a crossing where I can't avoid it.
Donít want to get into who has done what. BUT, I have a transatlantic under my belt and numerous runs, Panama, BVI, USVI and still hold that with an Iridium you can alter course to avoid the worst of a storm.

I get paid to deliver boats, in one piece. My contract allows me to do whatever I need to do for safety. Better to double back and sail west for a day, than to march into a nasty low.
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Old 30-12-2020, 12:40   #10
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Most important....fire blanket in the galley.
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Old 30-12-2020, 14:13   #11
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Notes in the order of your list. This list is a very good idea, and I hope that you see it is usually pretty easy to mitigate a situation if you prepare for it.

Edson has a steering inspection checklist. You should have an emergency tiller, and you should practice steering the boat with various alternative methods. Have your actually tried to steer with only the windvane? Some will do that and others will not. Can you steer the boat by adjusting the sails? With practice that is possible on most boats.

Learn how to inspect your rigging yourself. I have found issues my riggers missed, and have found issues that only showed up after a few thousand miles. I also have friends that were dismasted with a freshly rigged boat, and friends that found serious issues on a freshly rigged boat (requiring a complete re-re-rig) Carry dyneema and know how to rig a temporary stay with it. Inspect before and after every passage, and on long passage at least inspect everything at deck level once a week (or even daily).

Make sure you carry appropriate MOB gear, and practice using it. Lifesling, danbuoy, lifting gear. Consider AIS type MOB devices on life vests.

If possible, divide water between 2 tanks. Consider ways you could rig a way to catch rain water.

Maintain and test your propane system.

You companionway hatch should be able to be latched and unlatched from either side. For example, if you close and latch it from the inside, there needs to be a way for rescuers to unlatch it from the outside. If you have drop in boards, they need to be on lanyards so they can not go overboard. You should have a way to board up a portlight if a knockdown knocks them out.

If you have the parts, many windvane repairs can be made while underway. Broken safety tube, etc.

Effective communication, Iridium Go!/ Sat phone/ in reach will help in almost all of those situations.

Good list.
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Old 31-12-2020, 09:49   #12
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

I have a 12v submersible bilge pump set up to pump anywhere in the boat. It has a long power cable and a long discharge hose.
For Fire: pump outside water in to fight the fire. Then dewater it all overboard with the same pump and installed bilge pumps.
The only limitation is 12V availability. But a foot pump could be substituted.
I also have a small manual piston bilge pump as final back up.
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Old 31-12-2020, 09:54   #13
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Are you going to run for your risk assessment manual when something happens to make sure you have the right protocols in place , or do you not have the experience and quick thinking that is needed when on a sail boat in the ocean,
This is a ridiculous post, paper work for the health and safety executive.
All boats should have minimal safety and equipment and the knowledge to use it in any scenarios no matter , it seems perhaps you lack the knowledge.
As for Atlantic crossing and storms, very very rare in the proper window,
Get your rigging inspected , make sure you have more spares and provisions, whats the difference.
Decent liferaft and you will be picked up within a couple of days max with all the shipping about.
More worry than sense
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Old 31-12-2020, 10:10   #14
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Good list/good answers. Some things I carry you might consider.

Small but "clean" fire extinguishers in addition to a fire blanket in the galley. Not all fires rate the work involved with cleaning up dry powder residue. Couple of BIG extinguishers for when S*it hits the fan. Also consider a fixed engine room extinguishing system or a fire port. I also keep a smoke hood / fire escape mask at hand in berth and cockpit locker. A respirator for paint spraying will work in a pinch. It's the smoke that'll kill you.

Have some way to stop and rest beyond heaving to. Like a Jordan Series Drogue (JSD) and a sea anchor/parachute. Both can be invaluable especially if single handing. I've used a para-anchor to wait offshore for sun up and for just getting some rest. I have a JSD but like a life raft hope I never need to use it. Loose the oil bags.

When you say knock down, imagine turning your boat upside down and shaking it. You need to secure everything, not just the heavy stuff.
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Old 31-12-2020, 10:54   #15
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Re: Mitigation Tactics for Various Issues

Tarian,

Scotland is my favorite country. My most wonderful sailing experience was off the west coast of Scotland.

That being said, I think you could have conveyed your advice in a nicer way. There was no need to be so cutting. There was no need to characterize the post as "ridiculous." In fact, that was offensive of you. Everyone who is interested in sailing, loves the sea and sailing begins their experience with little knowledge. The gift of this forum is to share information, knowledge, experiences in a supportive and friendly fashion.

You could do better.

No need to reply,

Seamaiden



Quote:
Originally Posted by tarian View Post
Are you going to run for your risk assessment manual when something happens to make sure you have the right protocols in place , or do you not have the experience and quick thinking that is needed when on a sail boat in the ocean,
This is a ridiculous post, paper work for the health and safety executive.
All boats should have minimal safety and equipment and the knowledge to use it in any scenarios no matter , it seems perhaps you lack the knowledge.
As for Atlantic crossing and storms, very very rare in the proper window,
Get your rigging inspected , make sure you have more spares and provisions, whats the difference.
Decent liferaft and you will be picked up within a couple of days max with all the shipping about.
More worry than sense
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