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Old 03-01-2010, 09:28   #286
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May be if all SS involved match each other’s otherwise surprise, surprise.
To risky for me.
I would like to see a picture a picture of a failed ss anchor. I have worked in the petro-chemical industry for 30 years and have seen ss in many different acid and harch chemical conditions. After that is what it is used for. It is hard for me to believe salt walter desolves ss as you state ,
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Old 03-01-2010, 09:51   #287
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That's not the hard part. I saw 3/8" SS chain for $33.00 a foot.
That's crazy.
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Old 03-01-2010, 10:22   #288
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I would like to see a picture a picture of a failed ss anchor. I have worked in the petro-chemical industry for 30 years and have seen ss in many different acid and harch chemical conditions. After that is what it is used for. It is hard for me to believe salt walter desolves ss as you state ,
I have pics (cannot find) of a set of Stainless Steel rudder gudgeons and pintles that looked like they were eaten by worms. It is not the salt water that is doing the damage. It is the galvanic corrosion. Look it up. It is electric current set up from dis-similar metals in a salt water bath. In my case it was stray 240 volt current from a recently installed pump out facility near by. Please don't ask me to explain it, there are threads here a plenty. But it is the dis-similar metals in salt water that is the hazard. For this reason I would never use a Stainless shackle with a Galv. Anchor ad chain.
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Old 03-01-2010, 13:56   #289
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It's not the salt water and/or stainless steel, it's the electrical current that caused the corrosion. We were in a marina for a short time with stray electrical current in the water. Our bronze propellor got eaten up in a matter of a couple of weeks. The stainless pintles and gudgeons showed no sign of corrosion though our stainless bowsprit fitting did get a little pitting.

You can safely put stainless and bronze under water on the same boat if you keep those nasty little electrons away. Most often galvanic corrosion is not a problem of the boat but the marina or anchorage/other boats that are the problem.

I looked at the stainless version of the Spade anchor. It sure was beautiful and seemed to work very well without the encumbrance of a roll bar. Unfortunately, I can buy three Manson Supremes for the price of one of those SS anchors.
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Old 03-01-2010, 14:05   #290
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Stray electrial current should not be a problem when an anchor is in use Correct?
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Old 03-01-2010, 22:06   #291
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I would like to see a picture a picture of a failed ss anchor. I have worked in the petro-chemical industry for 30 years and have seen ss in many different acid and harch chemical conditions. After that is what it is used for. It is hard for me to believe salt walter desolves ss as you state ,
You do not have to work in the petro-chemical industry to find out how SS fail, you just have to own a boat.
It is the principle used to make steel “stain less” which makes SS vulnerable to “pollution”.
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Old 05-01-2010, 07:39   #292
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If the anchor was down all the time, then I suspect there could be a problem. But anchors don't usually work that way. So I suspect it would not be a real issue.. unless you have your anchor burried in the mud all the time.
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Old 05-01-2010, 07:45   #293
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You're forgetting something with this talk of corrosion caused by electrical current. This corrosion is the result of a potential difference between the grounding of the boat (water) and the grounding of the shore line (dirt). The anchor is, in fact, grounded in dirt and the potential difference between the anchor and the shore power should be minimal.

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Old 05-01-2010, 08:04   #294
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
It's not the salt water and/or stainless steel, it's the electrical current that caused the corrosion. We were in a marina for a short time with stray electrical current in the water. Our bronze propellor got eaten up in a matter of a couple of weeks. The stainless pintles and gudgeons showed no sign of corrosion though our stainless bowsprit fitting did get a little pitting.
It is another subject from this thread but any "shore power" induced electrolysis is easily stopped with a "galvanic isolator" in your shore power wiring. These devices have been available and around a very long time.
- - If "Med-mooring" to a marina with your own anchor instead of a bouy or French "lead-line" then you might be subject to electrolysis problems in your anchor. But again, all that is needed is to electrically isolate the anchor rode from your boat's bonding system. Leaving your anchor chain looped over your windlass is electrically connecting it to your boat's electrical grounding system and can facilitate electrolysis. Same thing with not having a short piece of rope between the bitter end and the boat's hull (purpose of the little piece of rope is to be able to "cut loose the whole anchor system in an emergency).
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Old 05-01-2010, 18:11   #295
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Stainless Steel Crevice Corrosion

Electrolysis caused by stray voltage is a separate issue and not likely connected to the issue of anchor material. Anchors are unlikely to be affected by stray voltage electrolysis.

Galvanic corrosion (a form of electrolysis) happens when two metals are connected in a single corrosive environment, such as salt water. A stainless swivel connecting galvanized chain and galvanized anchor, or stainless steel anchor at the end of a galvanized chain might be problematic over time. (I'm not an expert and I am speculating.)

Of far more serious concern is the insidious problem of crevice corrosion. Crevice corrosion is why people go over their stainless steel rigging with a magnifying glass looking for cracks, and why some cruisers use galvanized steel rigging. Two things cause the corrosion and with enough corrosion, failure of the stainless steel item: Crevice corrosion occurs when there is a difference in ion, or oxygen, concentration between the metal and its surroundings. Oxygen starvation in an electrolyte at the bottom of a sharp V-section will set up an anodic site in the metal that then corrodes rapidly. To function as a corrosion site, a crevice has to be of sufficient width to permit entry of the corrodent, but sufficiently narrow to ensure that the corrodent remains stagnant.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crevice_corrosion
Pitting Corrosion Crevice Corrosion
WHY APPLY A COATING -- CORROSION ?
chain test
Best Chain for Your Mooring Rigs
results of chain test
Practical Sailor Guide to Sailing ... - Google Books

Note that the Practical Sailor tests did not leave the chains laying in mud. I can't find the results published after three years of testing the chain. Had the stainless been lying in oxygen starved mud, it might have changed the results.

I suspect that the reason stainless steel anchors are so expensive is because of the manufacturing techniques necessary to prevent the occurrence of crevice corrosion, and not the cost of stainless steel. Obviously, weld quality is a critical issue. What happens when a stainless steel anchor gets scratched and banged up while doing its job?

Now would be a good time for stainless steel anchor manufacturers to chime in.
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Old 24-04-2011, 09:35   #296
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Re: Why Are Next-Gen Anchors Considered 'Better?'

This bloody thread and anchor issue is driving me NUTZ

We have a 44' steel behemoth that displaces about 40,000 lbs.

It came with a 45lb. CQR that drags like no tomorrow. We clearly need a much better anchor.

It has a bowsprit with a captive roller. The throat is only 5 inches high.

Because of the captive roller we can't fit a Rocna/Supreme.

The Spade will work, or a Delta or a Manson Ray.

I would go with the Spade but --- DAMN the PRICE$$$$$

I could modify the roller assembly but that would take some custom work and then I'd be right back at the Spade price.

Evan's seems to like the Ray, but that is pretty expensive as well.

I'm not made of money and have deep pockets but I'm willing to make a good investment.

It is just so gosh darn hard to figure out what is real and what is bull.


The price difference is just astounding
Plastimo Manta 66lb $270.
Anchorlift Shark 66lb $394
Anchorlift Claw 66lb $253
Anchorillift Shark 110lb $659
Lewmar Claw 66lb $204
Spade S140 $1,305
Manson Ray 78lb $1,100 (or 56lb for $950)

Looking at this mess, I could buy an Anchorlift Shark 110lb AND an Ancorlift Claw 66lb and still be less than a Spade S140 or the Ray.

Good grief that is a LOT of difference.

There is a LOT to be said for redundancy and having two different type anchors.
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Old 24-04-2011, 09:46   #297
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Re: Why Are Next-Gen Anchors Considered 'Better?'

Wow, a blast from the past thread revived! Check out the Kingston QuickSet anchor, which is a derivation of the Delta but looks to be a bit better and is made in Canada. Several on here have reported they are very well made. Personally, I would skip all of the Bruce knock-offs as most are made-in China cast units, which seem to have variable quality. Where are you having problems dragging the CQR? If it is soft Chesapeake mud I would recommend trying out a big Danforth or Fortress anchor, which excel in Chessy mud.
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Old 24-04-2011, 10:11   #298
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Re: Why Are Next-Gen Anchors Considered 'Better?'

Quote:
Originally Posted by hpeer View Post

We have a 44' steel behemoth that displaces about 40,000 lbs.

It came with a 45lb. CQR that drags like no tomorrow. We clearly need a much better anchor.
We do like the Ray . . . it's design and performance naturally suits our 'single huge anchor' philosophy.

If you are size and hoop constrained, the Spade is probably your best bet but it is expensive.

For less money the Delta is a very good anchor. You can get 55lbs for $462 or 88lbs for $681 at Defender. Given the tone of your message I would think about the biggest delta type you can fit.

Where are you anchoring?
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Old 24-04-2011, 10:20   #299
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Re: Why Are Next-Gen Anchors Considered 'Better?'

I should have mentioned above that it does appear that the Manson Ray is one of the best of the bunch in the currently available Bruce knock-off category, and it isn't made in China and appears to be very well made. Some of the other Bruce knock-offs appear to suffer from poor design as well as construction issues, so beware.
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Old 24-04-2011, 10:31   #300
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Re: Why Are Next-Gen Anchors Considered 'Better?'

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Wow, a blast from the past thread revived! Check out the Kingston QuickSet anchor, which is a derivation of the Delta but looks to be a bit better and is made in Canada.
OMG! RUN like crazy from anyone trying to sell you one of these pieces of metal masquerading as an anchor! Our boat came with one (the builder had specified a Delta, but this is what we received and unfortunately we didn't know any better), and the only thing it was good for was creating underwater furrows on the few times it landed upright.

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