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Old 08-09-2010, 06:07   #1
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When Do You Use a Second Anchor ?

Wind, wave height, etc. at which point do you use one?

And if on the same as most seem to recommend from some other threads, how do you deploy it? Just pull a bunch of scope in, attach it, and let it back out? That's gotta be a huge PITA if there's already a lot of tension on the rode?
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Old 08-09-2010, 06:09   #2
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typically we use a second anchor to deal with current that is different than prevailing winds. of course for us it is easy we just walk the anchor out :-)
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Old 08-09-2010, 06:13   #3
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Reversing currents.
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Old 08-09-2010, 06:41   #4
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I knew about currents, and Bahemian anchoring.

But really otherwise you just use one unless hurricane conditions?
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Old 08-09-2010, 07:13   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grunzster View Post
I knew about currents, and Bahemian anchoring.

But really otherwise you just use one unless hurricane conditions?
Pretty much. It helps to have the right sized (BIG) anchors.
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Old 08-09-2010, 07:23   #6
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1. strong reversing current (over 1 knot at least)
2. severe thunderstorm that will bring a sharp gust from a new dirrection

And in both cases, most often a bottom that will not allow dependable resetting. This means either heavy weeds or even worse, shells. Also shale or hard clay with patches of sand.

In mud or sand, a single good anchor should all most always do.
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Old 08-09-2010, 07:56   #7
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reversing current
winds higher than 25kts
when the holding is suspect
when the anchorage is tight
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Old 08-09-2010, 08:30   #8
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I carry 4 anchors. That said, I have never deployed more than 1 anchor ever. The tide swing in my home state of Maine is between 10 and 14 feet. This results in a fair amount of reversing current no matter where you are. I've never felt the need to send out a second anchor in all of my anchored nights in Maine.

I think it's important to note that having 2 sets of rode out with strong current is potentially creating a dangerous situation if you ever have to pull up the anchors quickly. I have seen so many situations in Maine especially, where tangled anchor lines created a very messy and dangerous situation.

I much prefer to set one anchor really well. My main anchor is 121 lbs with all chain rode. We sit for 5 or more minutes with our twin props spinning at 1,000 RPMs in reverse to assist in the setting of our anchor. Too many people drop their anchor, pull back a little, and tie it off. Then they claim the anchorage has "bad holding". We've all seen that many times. My feeling is that extra gear doesn't make up for bad procedure. It usually just creates more danger.

I know it's unpopular to always use a single anchor. There are situations when I'd throw out another but they would be very, very unusual circumstances and not one that I've seen in the 18,000 nm we're cruised so far.
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Old 09-09-2010, 07:33   #9
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The Complete Anchoring Handbook: Stay Put on Any Bottom in Any Weather by Alain Poiraud, Achim Ginsberg-Klemmt, and Erika Ginsberg-Klemmt (Paperback - Nov 7, 2007)
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:32   #10
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In that case, I should be fine. I've seen up to 20-25 knots, and chop up to 2'.

The only time I dragged in this spot, was shortly after moving, lazily not letting out enough rode, and an idiot in a ridiculous batman looking boat blasting by very close at high speed.

Would this work? Never heard of it being done before, but just thought of it myself. If you're using a bridle with an all chain rode, why not attach the second anchor after the bridle (on the lazy loop part of the rode)?
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:47   #11
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I'm with Active Capt and Gord,
Never deployed more than one and we've sat out 64 knots plus wind on that - admittedly in good holding ground.
Even locally we get tides come through at 5 knots and we survive with one.
Plus if all others in an anchorage are using one anchor (as is typical) then setting two so you cannot swing with the crowd is almost asking for trouble.
I'd hate to think what could happen if we ever laid two and had to reset / get out in a hurry.
Better IMHO to make sure the tackle you use (anchor and chain as well) is way above specification for any need you might experience - and use just one.
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Old 09-09-2010, 09:01   #12
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At the risk of getting the "This has been discussed to death" reply, I've had an issue recently along these line that I've been conteplating how to address.

I use a Danforth anchor (Fortress FX-11) with 20 ft. of chain and 200ft. of line. The boat is only 28 ft. and aprox. 8,500lbs. I don't normally have anchoring issues. I put out 50%-75 more scope than is required, then powerset the anchor with the engine and pull in the line to the appropriate scope. I always anchor at a min. of 7:1, and sometimes 10:1.

Earlier this summer, I anchored at noon on a Tuesday. We spun around and around 3,600 degrees over 3 days. I checked on the anchor on Thurs. and it looked fine. It was pretty much buried in the ssea bed. I did see the chain making a large circle around the anchor, but expected as much based on how much we revolved around the anchor over three days. I left the boat at 6:30 to go into town for dinner. I came back and the boat was gone. The chain fouled the anchor and the anchor dragged. The boat was recovered and there was no damage. (BTW- NOBODY wants this to happen as it now is considered a 'Salvage', but that is another story).

So despite setting it, checking it, spinnging for 3 days with no issues the anchor fouled and dragged and I'm holding a $5,000 (USD) salvage bill. (AWESOME!!!!)

So, now I'm considering future options:

1) Deploy a second anchor:
I've run a second anchor off the stern, but this holds the boat at angles which contradict wind, tide and wake. This causes a lot of slapping noise when sleeping and rocks the boat a bit more.

2) Bahama Moor:
This looks great, but the reduced radius that the boat swings would seem to create havoc in the anchorage unless everyone else is bahama moored as well. Plus it would seem to potentially tangle the 2 anchor rodes as you spin.


I'm strongly considering replacing the danforth with a Plow, CQR or Rocna. I like what I've read about Rocna.

so, would 2 anchors still be better in reversing currents, tides, winds, etc. or would simply using different ground tackle be the better solution here. I know it could be said that simply NOT leaving the boat would be a better option. However, i still need to sleep at night and would prefer not to wake up on the beach.
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Old 09-09-2010, 09:03   #13
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Originally Posted by grunzster View Post
Would this work? Never heard of it being done before, but just thought of it myself. If you're using a bridle with an all chain rode, why not attach the second anchor after the bridle
What would be the intent?

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In that case, I should be fine. I've seen up to 20-25 knots, and chop up to 2'.
As you might interpret from swagman's post above, 25 knots is nothing. From your OP, I believe you're talking about tandem anchors in series. Don't go there. Just worry about a single adequate anchor, of effective design and adequate size, and deploy adequate scope.
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Old 09-09-2010, 09:13   #14
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I always anchor at a min. of 7:1, and sometimes 10:1.
That part's good. With any anchor.

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Earlier this summer, I anchored at noon on a Tuesday. We spun around and around 3,600 degrees over 3 days. I checked on the anchor on Thurs. and it looked fine. It was pretty much buried in the ssea bed. I did see the chain making a large circle around the anchor, but expected as much based on how much we revolved around the anchor over three days. I left the boat at 6:30 to go into town for dinner. I came back and the boat was gone. The chain fouled the anchor and the anchor dragged.
Danforths can/will do that. Two flukes plus a stock = a tangle. Even if they don't foul, they simply don't handle veering loads at all well. They shouldn't be used as primary anchors on any boat.

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1) Deploy a second anchor
If the scenario calls for it. Otherwise a single anchor is always better. Use a type that will handle force veers and re-set itself well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrew View Post
2) Bahama Moor:
Kind of pointless unless you're talking about predictable 180 degree wind veers. We never use this set-up. Complication without much advantage. Use a type that will handle force veers and re-set itself well.

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so, would 2 anchors still be better in reversing currents, tides, winds, etc. or would simply using different ground tackle be the better solution here.
In principle the latter. The former might be called for in certain scenarios which you hint at. E.g. tight river with reversing tide and narrow anchoring zone, bow-and-stern arrangement might be necessary.
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Old 09-09-2010, 10:27   #15
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Awesome, thanks Craig. 28ft. (>9m) boat (8,500lbs/ 3.85mt). It looks like a Rocna 10 would suit fine and resolve the need for a dual anchor deployment as well as dragging, fouling etc.

I hope you don't mind if I ping you for some advice as I go through the purchase and mounting process this winter. I suspect I'll need to replace the bow roller as well.

Sorry to the OP for hi-jacking the thread. Then again, it is somewhat related.
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