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Old 13-02-2011, 07:57   #61
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The advert isn't wrong when it says

The legendary plow anchor stays put, won't break -

How are you going to get that back on board

However, given that he is on a budget at least we are looking in the right direction. The other type you may well find will be a Delta. The patent has now expired on the Delta design so there are lots of cheap copies appearing in the chandlers. However, the quality of the welding and galvanising is dreadful on the ones I have seen, but stick to a genuine large CQR or Delta and you won't go far wrong for sensible money.

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Old 13-02-2011, 08:05   #62
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Just for the fun of it, those who believe in massive weight in chain and anchor making up for poor design and holding power limitations should look up stories about light ships dragging anchor. You can Google up a bunch of them. Heavy anchors and massive chain didn't always keep them in position!
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Old 13-02-2011, 08:06   #63
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in my experience...it's not the wind but the water that makes or breaks holding anchor....so picking the anchorage can be huge in arguing whether all chain becomes an issue in extreme conditions. A good example are williwaw winds (100+ mph)....high winds but not long enough to build seas/swells....while you might come up tight on you chain...with no real pitching involved...regular snubbers provide enough protection.

so if you are caught before severe conditions...and many "old timers" usually aren't because they look/plan ahead...picking anchorages based on preventing surge can be huge.
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Old 13-02-2011, 08:07   #64
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Just for the fun of it, those who believe in massive weight in chain and anchor making up for poor design and holding power limitations should look up stories about light ships dragging anchor. You can Google up a bunch of them. Heavy anchors and massive chain didn't always keep them in position!
sea buoys drag all the time too...but I don't think anyone is advocating using 20,000 pound concrete blocks.
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Old 13-02-2011, 08:57   #65
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"sea buoys drag all the time too...but I don't think anyone is advocating using 20,000 pound concrete blocks."

You're absolutely right! I was just taking the argument for ever heavier anchors and all chain rode to its absurd conclusion. There is more to think about than pure weight.
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Old 13-02-2011, 09:11   #66
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"so if you are caught before severe conditions...and many "old timers" usually aren't because they look/plan ahead...picking anchorages based on preventing surge can be huge."

Agree, and unfortunately, I would put myself in the category of an "old timer." But, no matter who or where, there will come times when you have to anchor somewhere that is exposed to the seas. Just for example, when anchored during Hurricane Bob in Cuttyhunk harbor, which is normally landlocked through 360 degrees, the storm surge was well over 10 feet and all of a sudden the ocean was coming across the beach and there were six foot seas in the harbor. Also, take a look at the Cabo San Lucas disaster back in the 1980s for what can happen when a normally fine anchorage becomes untenable.

However, in Earl Hinz's book, The Complete Book of Anchoring and Mooring, which I consider the best ever written on the subject, he points out how much of the effect of catenary disappears in only 30-40 knots of wind, or less depending on the weight of your chain and how much you have out.
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Old 13-02-2011, 09:31   #67
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I skipped most of the replies.... damn slack internet here

I agree with those that suggested you might look at other anchors that a Bruce. Its very unusual to see anyone with a Bruce as their primary anchor. I don't think I have seen any long range cruisers with one on the bow.

Those with money seem to be heading for the Rocna or Manson Suprime. Those without the money are often working with Delta knock-offs.

Its interesting that oil rigs often use Bruce anchors (a tad larger than 33 lbs!) but they use divers or a submersible to set them.


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Old 13-02-2011, 09:41   #68
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Wow, you guys must think Lowride14 lives in one of the areas frequently exposed to the wrath of Gods. The truth is, winds of 40kt+ are rare if not unknown between May and the end of October around here, and there is an abundance of all weather/directional anchorages throughout the area. I still say go for it on the cheap, enjoy, and learn along the way. Many of us did, even without the Canadian boat handling profeciency(sp) card. It's to beautiful of an area to wait until everythings perfect, and there's always government docks if need be, to go get another anchor/rode if that ones lost or *****. We're not talking about crossing the Pacific here.
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Old 13-02-2011, 09:48   #69
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Which all brings me back to my dream boat, a 100 by 35 by 10 ft jack up barge.
Just find your spot and jack the barge up out of the water by a good 10 ft and kick back.
I'm talking about 3500 sq ft of living space per level. One level for mechanical and two for living.
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Old 13-02-2011, 10:25   #70
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Most anchorages are not even close to being storm anchorages. Too many here in Jersey forget that the marshes flood with several feet of water and 2-4 foot waves develop and race across them in good nor'easters...thus beating or sinking their boats that usually sit quietly in tidal creeks.


I'd rather be anchored in the open on the lee side of an island (unless wind swing will change 180) possibly than be in a necked down well protected harbor that is open to the sea on the windward side of an island.

Ground tackle of any type will probably work in high winds and no surge...but even the best and/or heaviest may not work when exposed to heavy surge.
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Old 13-02-2011, 10:28   #71
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Which all brings me back to my dream boat, a 100 by 35 by 10 ft jack up barge.
Just find your spot and jack the barge up out of the water by a good 10 ft and kick back.
I'm talking about 3500 sq ft of living space per level. One level for mechanical and two for living.
Look up the articles of the two that wrecked off the jersey coast over the last several years! Even they can't defeat mother nature in certain situations...and no the weather wasn't extreme or unpredicted.
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Old 13-02-2011, 11:21   #72
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I'd agree that it's too small, but might not go as far as "much too small."

Either way, pass it up unless it's almost free.
It's much too small to use full time unnattended while at work, gales while at work kinda lifestyle. He wants to live on the anchor.

I agree it's Large enough if your present most of the time.
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Old 13-02-2011, 12:01   #73
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is good fro a secondary /kedge/ added weight. no such thing as too many anchors if you live on hook.
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Old 13-02-2011, 12:32   #74
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A 44 lb anchor is 33% better than a 33 lb anchor, period.
Can you point to a data source that shows this? Just mulling this over in my mind I would have thought that many variables affect holding ability of two similar anchors of differing weight, including such things as the anchor size relative to the viscosity/consistency of the bottom and rode (catenary) and the associated pull angle.

It's really a simple linear relationship? It must therefore be able to be expressed in an equation that would be handy to know.
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Old 13-02-2011, 13:37   #75
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Does not sound to me like 33 Bruce is too big for a 38 footer. The table can be wrong, maybe someone meant kilograms where they typed pounds ? (I have never seen a 16.5 pound Bruce either ...).

In a 26 footer, I consider a 33 pound next generation gizmo like Spade, Mason or Rocna a good choice (probably a bit too big, but so what). I would also use a 33 Bruce (or Danforth, etc.) and consider it perfectly adequate.

Your boat 38'?

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