Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 01-09-2012, 10:03   #61
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Fethiye Turkey
Boat: Lagoon 440
Posts: 2,954
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

Quote:
Originally Posted by goldiphlox View Post
I think i would just move....especially after seeing all of this. I know its not right, if i were there first but rather than cause alot of damage to my boat....better yet...maybe i'll stick to uncharted desert isles....
Right now it is the season for the ITALIANS fron end of june to end of August, they fill the anchorages and waterways all around adjacent areas, here in Northern Croatia, FUNTANA and PULA they have such an effect that the Menus are to suit the ITALIANO, not much different to the ENGLISH in SPAIN....Part of cruising, best Pasta tho!!!!
__________________
"Political correctness is a creeping sickness that knows no boundaries"
Lagoon4us is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 06:18   #62
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Fethiye Turkey
Boat: Lagoon 440
Posts: 2,954
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

LOST FOR WORDS!!!

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN3592.JPG
Views:	322
Size:	127.0 KB
ID:	47014  
__________________
"Political correctness is a creeping sickness that knows no boundaries"
Lagoon4us is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 17:18   #63
Registered User
 
dandrews's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Shirley, MA
Boat: Bristol 34
Posts: 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagoon4us
LOST FOR WORDS!!!

OMG... Why would someone do that? Hoping the anchor would fail so he could make an insurance claim? Dumbfounded!
dandrews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 17:52   #64
S/V rubber ducky
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Florida cruising currently
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 18,049
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagoon4us View Post
LOST FOR WORDS!!!


That must have really taken some work ............... and a good drill ...............and quite a few drill bits!
__________________
It is OK if others want to do it different on THEIR boat
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 18:01   #65
Marine Service Provider

Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Port Orange Fl
Boat: Morgan 321 - 32'
Posts: 66
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

Nice picture - is it a Swiss (cheese) plow?

In my 10 years of cruising, living mainly on the hook (nice BIG ones), I can't even count the problems we've had with other boats anchoring too close, bumping into us, sliding down the side of us in the night squall. My then-partner rescued many other boats that were either dragging down on other boats or slowly drifting out of different harbors.

It's not that hard - hefty anchors, lots of chain and have enough of it out - make sure it sets, back down on it. Don't leave the boat immediately after setting the anchor either, give it a chance.

Possibly another good idea - stay out of harbors known for attracting lots of charter boats.
__________________
S/V Therapy, Morgan 321
https://amzn.com/B009RCO02G
www.Facebook.com/IslandFeverCruising
sloopygirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 18:16   #66
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

Quote:
Originally Posted by dandrews View Post
OMG... Why would someone do that? Hoping the anchor would fail so he could make an insurance claim? Dumbfounded!
Five top answers to that question:

#5, a racer who couldn't afford a Fortress, but who still wanted a lightweight anchor...

#4, the dock boy you forgot to tip...

#3, an English major who thought that this would be an artistic way to "galvanize" an anchor...

#2, the girlfriend who found someone else's panties in the v-berth...

#1, the fellow who just bought Rocna Incorporated, who wants to prove once and for all that made-in-China anchor stocks are not inferior.
__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 18:20   #67
Registered User
 
Khagan1227's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Kansas City, MO
Boat: In the hunt again, unknown
Posts: 1,332
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagoon4us View Post
LOST FOR WORDS!!!

I want this guy on MY team, talk about thinking outside the box!
Khagan1227 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 18:26   #68
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,441
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

C'mon guys, this is not likely to affect the strength significantly, even measurably, if the smallest margin between holes is sufficient (hard to judge from the photo)

It's common practice to castellate or otherwise remove most of the mass from the web of an I -section beam, as this part of the section contributes very little to strength.

A genuine CQR (which from a glance this appears to have been) has a massively strong shank and could well afford this.

Compare it with the shanks of certain 'new generation' anchors where, instead of a row of holes, you have a slot.
Now this DOES make a major difference to strength, to a flat-plate shank which already starts off MUCH weaker than the impact-forged, high-alloy steel shank of a genuine CQR.

(as a fringe benefit, the lightening holes make the anchor shown- paradoxically - cheaper to re-galvanise. )

If there's a valid criticism, maybe it's on the score of balance, which will be altered, but quite possibly in a good way.
Andrew Troup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 18:38   #69
Registered User
 
Khagan1227's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Kansas City, MO
Boat: In the hunt again, unknown
Posts: 1,332
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Troup View Post
C'mon guys, this is not likely to affect the strength significantly, even measurably, if the smallest margin between holes is sufficient (hard to judge from the photo)

It's common practice to castellate or otherwise remove most of the mass from the web of an I -section beam, as this part of the section contributes very little to strength.

A genuine CQR (which from a glance this appears to have been) has a massively strong shank and could well afford this.

Compare it with the shanks of certain 'new generation' anchors where, instead of a row of holes, you have a slot.
Now this DOES make a major difference to strength, to a flat-plate shank which already starts off MUCH weaker than the impact-forged, high-alloy steel shank of a genuine CQR.

(as a fringe benefit, the lightening holes make the anchor shown- paradoxically - cheaper to re-galvanise. )

If there's a valid criticism, maybe it's on the score of balance, which will be altered, but quite possibly in a good way.
While I would agree with part of you assessment of the "lighting holes", such as those used in the brackets between the double bottoms of many ships. The varying size of the holes and slip shod manner of their arrangement leads me to believe this guy has no clue about calculating the strength of the remaining metal.

Just my opinion.
Khagan1227 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 18:48   #70
Registered User
 
Nicholson58's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Caribbean live aboard
Boat: Camper & Nicholson58 Ketch - ROXY Traverse City, Michigan No.668283
Posts: 5,170
Images: 84
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Troup View Post
C'mon guys, this is not likely to affect the strength significantly, even measurably, if the smallest margin between holes is sufficient (hard to judge from the photo)

It's common practice to castellate or otherwise remove most of the mass from the web of an I -section beam, as this part of the section contributes very little to strength.

A genuine CQR (which from a glance this appears to have been) has a massively strong shank and could well afford this.

Compare it with the shanks of certain 'new generation' anchors where, instead of a row of holes, you have a slot.
Now this DOES make a major difference to strength, to a flat-plate shank which already starts off MUCH weaker than the impact-forged, high-alloy steel shank of a genuine CQR.

(as a fringe benefit, the lightening holes make the anchor shown- paradoxically - cheaper to re-galvanise. )

If there's a valid criticism, maybe it's on the score of balance, which will be altered, but quite possibly in a good way.
If you calculated the mass removed it will amount to about 5% or less. Light weighting is OK if you can control the load direction. The fail loading on an anchor is SIDEWAYS and this was just dumb.
Nicholson58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 19:09   #71
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,441
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholson58 View Post
If you calculated the mass removed it will amount to about 5% or less. Light weighting is OK if you can control the load direction. The fail loading on an anchor is SIDEWAYS and this was just dumb.
Huh? Perhaps you're looking at another picture? The one I see shows a CQR. The shank is hinged where it joins the ploughshares. There is NO possibility of side load.

Furthermore, the cross section is similar to that of a con-rod. The web is even closer to the neutral axis laterally than up & down, hence contributes almost nothing to bending strength side-to-side (even less than up-and-down), so even if the hinge jammed, there's no real issue.

Regarding another post: As for the untidy disposition of the holes as an indication the guy doesn't know how to calculate how much material to leave... well in the specific case of a CQR it really doesn't require calculation, for the reasons mentioned in my earlier post.

Even in a less over-specc-ed shank: As long as there's some minimal level of shear coupling between the upper and lower flanges (and an occasional connection providing resistance to buckling of the upper flange under compression...) further material in the web around midheight serves no useful purpose.
Andrew Troup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 19:58   #72
Registered User
 
dandrews's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Shirley, MA
Boat: Bristol 34
Posts: 235
All the technical comments aside....that thing is just plain ugly.
dandrews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 20:04   #73
Registered User
 
Dsanduril's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Petersburg, AK
Boat: Outremer 50S
Posts: 3,841
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

Quote:
Huh? Perhaps you're looking at another picture? The one I see shows a CQR. The shank is hinged where it joins the ploughshares. There is NO possibility of side load.
I have a genuine CQR with a bent shank that begs to differ
Dsanduril is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 20:05   #74
Registered User
 
Nicholson58's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Caribbean live aboard
Boat: Camper & Nicholson58 Ketch - ROXY Traverse City, Michigan No.668283
Posts: 5,170
Images: 84
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Troup View Post
Huh? Perhaps you're looking at another picture? The one I see shows a CQR. The shank is hinged where it joins the ploughshares. There is NO possibility of side load.

Furthermore, the cross section is similar to that of a con-rod. The web is even closer to the neutral axis laterally than up & down, hence contributes almost nothing to bending strength side-to-side (even less than up-and-down), so even if the hinge jammed, there's no real issue.

Regarding another post: As for the untidy disposition of the holes as an indication the guy doesn't know how to calculate how much material to leave... well in the specific case of a CQR it really doesn't require calculation, for the reasons mentioned in my earlier post.

Even in a less over-specc-ed shank: As long as there's some minimal level of shear coupling between the upper and lower flanges (and an occasional connection providing resistance to buckling of the upper flange under compression...) further material in the web around midheight serves no useful purpose.
Have your ever seen a failed shank? THe anchor gets wedged in rocks, shank is prevented from swinging on its hinge, wind changes, shank bends. That is what all of the ROCNA flap is about. I can't imagine spending a pile of money on a mature & successful design and then presume to outguess the designers and evolution of the product especially a hip-shot with a drill. I do machine design for a living. What was done to this anchor weakened it and puts his vessel at increased risk.
Nicholson58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2012, 21:27   #75
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Fethiye Turkey
Boat: Lagoon 440
Posts: 2,954
Re: Really Bad Anchoring Examples ... Pictures

It was on a smallish boat i think he wanted a 25lb CQR not a 27LB'ER!!! It had been galvanised after drilling, a couple of the holes were cutting into the edges a bit high.

I walked past it on the way to the village in MILNA on BRAC which is the island the stone for the Whitehouse came from and just had to share the pic....

Definately a SWISS CQR..
__________________
"Political correctness is a creeping sickness that knows no boundaries"
Lagoon4us is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
anchor, anchoring

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:25.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.