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Old 16-09-2011, 22:48   #46
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Re: No Windlass

Quote:
Originally Posted by Strait Shooter View Post
I hauled the anchor on my first boat (26' Laguna) by hand for 4 years and never had an issue with it until the last time.

I got caught in Hood Canal by a strengthing wind and increasingly nasty chop and ran for Dabob Bay. It took me a while to get into the lee of some land and when I did I found it not quite so nice there either. I decided to try to get into the Quilcene marina only to find a bar exposed across the entrance during an extremely low tide. Needless to say, at this point I'm tired, cold, wet and uuummm shall we say paying very close attention to what has evolved.

I start to head out of the harbor to try to get someplace safe and the winds again start to increase to a point where I'm seriously questioning my reasoning abilities when it comes to plastic, winds, water and my life.

I made the decision (right or wrong) to try to find the calmest waters in the bay and get an anchor down (25 lb danforth, 50 ft of chain and 100 ft of nylon
rode). I singlehand and was comfortable with setting/retrieving anchor on and off sail, by hand. I actually thought I was pretty slick at it. The setting of the anchor this time under power went well and I thought I could catch my breath and maybe get some tea in me while I waited this out.

As I went below (engine still at idle) I felt the boat lurch aft and I hauled butt back into the cockpit to see my landmarks I used slide past my reference point. Not good. I sat there for a minute hoping that the anchor would reset
itself but I was not in the gods good graces at this time apparently. The boat is bouncing all over the place, the winds are not subsiding and I now have to raise the anchor and get out of Dodge before my little plastic tub comes to rest against some floating oyster beds.

Under calmer conditions I had raised the anchor by hand using the bow roller while sitting. I was not about to sit on that deck under these conditions. As I pulled the anchor up, the wind and waves would drive the bow towards the oyster beds. I would madly tie off what I had raised and scramble to the cockpit to get steerage speed only to have the anchor catch on something and require me to repeat this process yet again. The whole time this is happening I'm getting closer and closer to the oyster beds. On the third attempt I was able to steer the boat into deeper waters, point her into the wind and retrieve the rest of the anchor.

I eventually tied off to a six foot round steel mooring ball used by commercial boats. I went below to make my tea and fell fast asleep at the settee with the tea kettle on and the winds howling around me. I sold that boat shortly after this happened. I realized I didn't have the right tool for what I was doing.

My hands by the way were torn up. I felt the power being transmitted through that anchor rode and knew it could take a finger or even a hand off or at the least seriously flay it should I misstep be taken.

My point to telling this is that in calm waters you may be right in assuming you can man (woman) handle an anchor and rode aboard. During that one percent of the time when things just aren't going your way, beware of the UnderToad!


John
A sincere thank you for that story John. I had been in the same situation a few times and with a windlass. Still, it was a difficult task. I hate to say it but I think most people who say you do not need a windlass on a small vessel have not experienced what you have. And by all means if their boat stays in protected waters it's whole life, why would it need one?
I'm such a wus now that I like having an electric windlass. A few boats ago I had an Ingrid 38. At 25000 lbs, the electric was nice.
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Old 17-09-2011, 07:39   #47
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Re: No Windlass

Quote:
Originally Posted by Strait Shooter View Post
My point to telling this is that in calm waters you may be right in assuming you can man (woman) handle an anchor and rode aboard. During that one percent of the time when things just aren't going your way, beware of the
Whether you use a windless or not, you should use the motor to take the strain off the rode. The trick is give enough power to take off the strain but not so much that you overrun your anchor. This is easier if you have someone at the helm to make steering adjustments. Also having a way to secure the chain helps a lot (stopper, hook, etc).
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Old 17-09-2011, 14:17   #48
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Re: No windlass

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Originally Posted by Rakuflames View Post
I've seen some kind of a system that uses a floating buoy to help break the anchor free, but I haven't seen a description of how it works that makes sense to me.

That is the one I mentioned in an earlier post. Here is a link for it and instructions. Sounds like it would work, and enable you to get out of the area (away from shore and other boats) before needing to fully nest the anchor.

Link to anchor retriever:
http://www.savvyboater.com/store/p/486-Anchor-Ring-Stainless-Anchor-Retriever-by-Ironwood-Pacific.aspx
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Old 17-09-2011, 15:41   #49
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Re: No Windlass

We built ours from scratch. Just bought a gypsy and the rest of the stuff came from the scrapyard. It is an electric model, but a manual one would be even easier to knock up.
Regards,
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Old 17-09-2011, 15:51   #50
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Old 17-09-2011, 15:58   #51
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Re: No Windlass

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Originally Posted by SayGudday View Post
Gudday!

What are the options if you don't have a windlass? I assume there is a way to use the existing winches and maybe some additional blocks to raise the anchor? Something similar to what the Egyptians did when building the pyramids?
YES! just acquire a young strong slave like them!
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Old 17-09-2011, 18:48   #52
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Re: No Windlass

Hey has anyone used one of those floats that hook arround your anchor as in the link STG just posted ? was woundering if the anchor chain scratches the heck out of your sides as you motor away ?
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Old 22-09-2011, 08:30   #53
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Re: No Windlass

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Originally Posted by s/v Moondancer View Post
I have a 122 lb anchor and lots of chain and when the windlass quit I got it up by running and old jib sheet as a messenger/hauling line tied to the chain with a rolling hitch and then led back to the primary jib winch.

If you have crew you can run alternate messenger lines one to each side. Lots of winch work but it works.
Did you use any extra blocks for mechanical advantage, Phil?
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Old 22-09-2011, 08:51   #54
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Re: No Windlass

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Originally Posted by Dennis.G View Post
Get yourself an anchor chain pawl. This allows your to pull chain in a bit at a time without having to hold the weight of the chain between pulls. Mounted properly on your deck this is great. I think for most boats below 32' this is all you need. I used such a setup for years with 125' of anchor chain. A pair of good gloves recommended too so you leave some skin on your hands.

Like this: Accessories
Been on the look out for one of these actually. The search continues (mostly because I can't afford a new one)
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Old 22-09-2011, 09:01   #55
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Re: No Windlass

Quote:
Originally Posted by SayGudday View Post
Gudday!

What are the options if you don't have a windlass? I assume there is a way to use the existing winches and maybe some additional blocks to raise the anchor? Something similar to what the Egyptians did when building the pyramids?
You might find the following discussion useful http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...ass-68465.html

To quote my post from that:

Quote:
A l-o-n-g time ago when I was much younger, had a much smaller boat (a Thunderbird 26) and very little money, I made such a windlass out of an old cast-off single action sheet winch. I covered the barrel of the winch with a leather cuff, sewn up with monel wire while the leather (from a shoe-makers shop) was wet (2-layers). Our anchor chain (1/4") passed through a chain stopper and to the winch where I could make two or three rounds and tail with one-hand without difficulty with the chain-stopper taking up tension on the chain when I released the tail. It worked quite well and I only had to redo the leather once in 8 years.


Prior to cobbeling up my home made windlass--above-- I used my jib halyard winch with a length of 3/8" line connected to a chain-hook. I connected the chain hook to a link of the chain at the chain-stopper and led the line to the winch, which let me haul in about 12' of chain at a time. When I eased the line, the chain stopper took the strain on the rhode and I could reset the hook. It got to be a pain in the neck so I cobbled up the windlass described above.

FWIW...
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Old 22-09-2011, 09:14   #56
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Re: No windlass

Quote:
Originally Posted by STG View Post
That is the one I mentioned in an earlier post. Here is a link for it and instructions. Sounds like it would work, and enable you to get out of the area (away from shore and other boats) before needing to fully nest the anchor.

Link to anchor retriever:
http://www.savvyboater.com/store/p/486-Anchor-Ring-Stainless-Anchor-Retriever-by-Ironwood-Pacific.aspx
Thank you!
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Old 22-09-2011, 09:20   #57
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Re: No Windlass

Quote:
Originally Posted by Strait Shooter View Post
I hauled the anchor on my first boat (26' Laguna) by hand for 4 years and never had an issue with it until the last time.

I got caught in Hood Canal by a strengthing wind and increasingly nasty chop and ran for Dabob Bay. It took me a while to get into the lee of some land and when I did I found it not quite so nice there either. I decided to try to get into the Quilcene marina only to find a bar exposed across the entrance during an extremely low tide. Needless to say, at this point I'm tired, cold, wet and uuummm shall we say paying very close attention to what has evolved.

I start to head out of the harbor to try to get someplace safe and the winds again start to increase to a point where I'm seriously questioning my reasoning abilities when it comes to plastic, winds, water and my life.

I made the decision (right or wrong) to try to find the calmest waters in the bay and get an anchor down (25 lb danforth, 50 ft of chain and 100 ft of nylon
rode). I singlehand and was comfortable with setting/retrieving anchor on and off sail, by hand. I actually thought I was pretty slick at it. The setting of the anchor this time under power went well and I thought I could catch my breath and maybe get some tea in me while I waited this out.

As I went below (engine still at idle) I felt the boat lurch aft and I hauled butt back into the cockpit to see my landmarks I used slide past my reference point. Not good. I sat there for a minute hoping that the anchor would reset
itself but I was not in the gods good graces at this time apparently. The boat is bouncing all over the place, the winds are not subsiding and I now have to raise the anchor and get out of Dodge before my little plastic tub comes to rest against some floating oyster beds.

Under calmer conditions I had raised the anchor by hand using the bow roller while sitting. I was not about to sit on that deck under these conditions. As I pulled the anchor up, the wind and waves would drive the bow towards the oyster beds. I would madly tie off what I had raised and scramble to the cockpit to get steerage speed only to have the anchor catch on something and require me to repeat this process yet again. The whole time this is happening I'm getting closer and closer to the oyster beds. On the third attempt I was able to steer the boat into deeper waters, point her into the wind and retrieve the rest of the anchor.

I eventually tied off to a six foot round steel mooring ball used by commercial boats. I went below to make my tea and fell fast asleep at the settee with the tea kettle on and the winds howling around me. I sold that boat shortly after this happened. I realized I didn't have the right tool for what I was doing.

My hands by the way were torn up. I felt the power being transmitted through that anchor rode and knew it could take a finger or even a hand off or at the least seriously flay it should I misstep be taken.

My point to telling this is that in calm waters you may be right in assuming you can man (woman) handle an anchor and rode aboard. During that one percent of the time when things just aren't going your way, beware of the UnderToad!


John
Thanks for sharing, John. As an inexperienced sailor, I'll ask a question that is probably pretty naive (fortunately I have no pride whatsoever): could you not have used the motor to keep yourself off the oyster beds and other nasties?
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Old 22-09-2011, 09:59   #58
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Re: No Windlass

Quote:
Originally Posted by SayGudday View Post
Thanks for sharing, John. As an inexperienced sailor, I'll ask a question that is probably pretty naive (fortunately I have no pride whatsoever): could you not have used the motor to keep yourself off the oyster beds and other nasties?
Yes, and that's exactly what I HAD to do, but the anchor was dragging and I couldn't just motor away as the anchor kept hanging up on the bottom. It turned into a race to see if I could get the anchor off the bottom and get back to the cockpit to try and motor away before impact with solid objects.

I'm sure I'd have had the same problems (singlehand) with a windlass, but it would have been a lot easier IMHO.
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Old 22-09-2011, 10:05   #59
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Re: No Windlass

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Originally Posted by Strait Shooter View Post
Yes, and that's exactly what I HAD to do, but the anchor was dragging and I couldn't just motor away as the anchor kept hanging up on the bottom. It turned into a race to see if I could get the anchor off the bottom and get back to the cockpit to try and motor away before impact with solid objects.

I'm sure I'd have had the same problems (singlehand) with a windlass, but it would have been a lot easier IMHO.
Gotya. One of the most valuable things about these forums is hearing stories like yours because it forces you to make a plan in case you ever find yourself in that situation. Again, much thanks.
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