Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 05-04-2014, 09:59   #16
Moderator
 
noelex 77's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Boat: Bestevaer.
Posts: 12,578
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleWhisky View Post
I still hope for Noelex77 description of the technique they are using for mooring to the rocks (in other thread he wrote about using a fender tied to the floating line, but I'm not sure how it works)
Great article Tomasz

When anchoring and tying tying up to a rock or tree (I don't think its important if we call this Med mooring, or a stern tie, or something else) the first decision is to judge if there is enough time to get ashore and tie off the stern before it swings away. (Swinging into danger or at least too far away for the length of rope)
As there is often a reasonable degree of crosswind the usual answer is no.

It takes a surprising long time to get ashore find a suitable rock and tie a rope around it. Often you have to get out of the dingy hang on to the dingy painter (to stop the dingy drifting away ) scrabble up the rocks thread the line around the rocks etc.

So we generally do this in two stages. My wife and I select a suitable spot. Usually one of us motors around (or temporally anchors) while the other goes ashore and selects the rock ties a rope (or chain is better) around it. We lead this rope into the water with a bit of chain to anchor it, so that it is very quick and easy to grab from the dingy. This usually means dropping the rope with a fender or float on the end in shallow water. Sometimes the tail can be left on top of rock. The main thing is to have to rope quick and easy to grab without getting out of the dingy, or turning off the motor.

Drop the anchor as per normal (although you might as well use a long scope) back up towards the rock when you get close enough the the dingy takes a line from the boat and ties it to line that is already well secured around the rock. The sole aim of the preparation is to be able to attach the stern line quickly.

There are many alternatives and no one right way, An p option I often use is just to swim ashore instead of using the tender, but the two step procedure is safer. A common problem otherwise is as the boat backs to the rocks someone goes out in the tender, but before they can secure the stern the boat stars swinging away. The stern line needs to be attached quickly with any crosswind.

A few general tips:
1. Make sure you have shoes on when you go to attach to rocks (the ever fashionable Crocs are ideal)

2. Swimming the line ashore is sometimes the easiest way. A long lightweight floating line is helpful. Once the stern is secure it can be replaced with something more. substantial.

3. Two stern lines are better. It is amazing how often even substantial rock can be broken and the boat sits better with two lines.

4. Unless you tie very close to the rocks put a fender in the middle of the stern line to make it visible. I also usually attach a battery operated flashing light.

5. Watch out for shallow spots coming in. The rudder is easily damaged if you hit a rock. Sometimes it is better to tie a long stern line and slowly winch it in (with a sheet winch).

6. A crosswind puts a lot of force on the anchor. There is an alternative where the "stern line" is led to the bow allowing the boat to pivot, but if there are strong crosswinds its a Med moor better avoided. Have a good anchor in case the wind is not as forecast. Even a short drag will cause you to hit the rocks.

7. If tying to rocks consider chafe. I often use a short length of chain. This is easy to jam between the rocks and the weight helps stop it lifting up.

8. If tying to a tree be careful about the possibility of ring barking the tree. Make sure it is a big tree for strength.

9. Consider how boats that are anchored normally in the anchorage will swing. Your bow will be sticking out from shore.

10. The breeze won't always be from the bow like it is when anchoring normally. If it rains things under the doger may get wet etc.

11. Make the stern line long. The shore is often father away than it seems. Check it is free to run out without tangling. A milk crate or canvas bag is good.

12. Old ropes are better for the stern line. Something that can be cut and left in an emergency is good.
noelex 77 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2014, 12:50   #17
Registered User
 
Capt Phil's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Gig Harbor, WA
Boat: Prior boats: Transpac 49; DeFever 54
Posts: 2,874
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Your description and solution of spring lines to dampen crosswind movement was very thorough and concise, Thomas... thank you for that. Having come across a couple of vessels using springs to try and dampen the bow movement and having them refuse to accomodate anyone else trying to med moor next to them is maddening, rude and invites trouble. My lack of speaking greek and their apparent inability to speak french, english or german made the situations even more problematic. Does not make for a comfortable anchorage or mooring! Some folks are rude no matter where you are in the world! Cheers, Phil
Capt Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2014, 13:36   #18
Registered User
 
Hydra's Avatar

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Lorient, Brittany, France
Boat: Gib'Sea 302, 30' - Hydra
Posts: 1,230
Re: Mediterranean mooring

When Med mooring out of ports in tidal areas, it's important to take soundings in the final location intended for the keel. It's not sufficient to check around the boat with a lead line: there could be an isolated rock just under the keel and it isn't pleasant to be awakened in the middle of the night by this rock touching the keel.

Alain
Hydra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2014, 15:51   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: on board, Australia
Boat: 11meter Power catamaran
Posts: 3,632
Images: 3
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Phil View Post
Not being brought up as a natural diver (weather and water was too bloody cold in Canada!), I was fortunate to marry a licensed PADI Instructor who introduced me to the sport later in life. Had I learned earlier, I would have employed the skill and knowledge on more than a few opportunities.
I agree entirely with your suggestions that having dive gear aboard any sailing vessel is a sound practice. Not only is it helpful in monitoring how your ground tackle is set, untangling anchors and rode as well as normal inspections of hulls, zincs and props are activities where dive gear is regularly required.
Your suggestion that dive gear can also be used for salvage is a good one provided you don't bring up Rocna's!
Thanks for making a very valuable point... cheers, Phil
Based in Australia I am hoping to salvage an Excel rather than Rocna. So far they have been buried too deep and I don't have a sand pump.

downunder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2014, 15:56   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: on board, Australia
Boat: 11meter Power catamaran
Posts: 3,632
Images: 3
Re: Mediterranean mooring

For those experienced(El Pingo) in areas such as Patagonia are there any other important points. Perhaps as Nolex has indicated the term stern tie is perhaps best used in those situations as there are some other points vs stern tied to a jetty/wall in med mooring fashion.
downunder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2014, 20:04   #21
Elvish meaning 'Far-Wanderer'
 
Palarran's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Boat - Bahamas - Me - Michigan
Boat: 56' Fountaine Pajot Marquises
Posts: 3,424
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Great postings guys. Thanks for the hard work.

FWIW, on stern ties we always use the dingy and then bring the line from shore directly to the boat. I've seen a lot of sailors get pulled off their feet onto the rocks swimming from the boat to shore to tie up.
__________________
Our course is set for an uncharted sea
Dante
Palarran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2014, 03:28   #22
Moderator
 
DoubleWhisky's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Home at Warsaw, Poland, boat in Eastern Med
Boat: Ocean Star 56.1 LR
Posts: 1,841
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by noelex 77 View Post
A few general tips
Thank You Noelex for such a thorough post.
Anchored fender look like a great idea - especially for short handed teams

The only single thing i may think about to add is:

Remember the bottom contour. Close to the shore sometime the bottom can be of unexpected profile. For example it can be a little shallower at the mouth of the bight. So remember not to put Your anchor on the slope of the bottom, steepening down towards the boat - it will put the anchor in most unfavourable position. The same applies when You put Your anchor close to one shore of the cove and the stern close to another shore. You may have excellent shelter this way, but check which side is better for anchoring. Forward looking sonar is great for this, but the depth sounder and some patience will do
DoubleWhisky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2014, 03:33   #23
Moderator
 
DoubleWhisky's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Home at Warsaw, Poland, boat in Eastern Med
Boat: Ocean Star 56.1 LR
Posts: 1,841
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Phil View Post
Having come across a couple of vessels using springs to try and dampen the bow movement and having them refuse to accomodate anyone else trying to med moor next to them is maddening, rude and invites trouble. My lack of speaking greek and their apparent inability to speak french, english or german made the situations even more problematic. Does not make for a comfortable anchorage or mooring! Some folks are rude no matter where you are in the world! Cheers, Phil

Hi Phil
Unhappily this springing thing is not only Greek one...
I met a lot of others - Italians, Greeks, Brits - doing the same...
Also mooring alongside where it is just openly dangerous and next complaining obout the poor shelter causing the damage to their precious boats... Some are even writing letters to Yachting Monthly or Yachting World complaining...
DoubleWhisky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2014, 03:35   #24
Moderator
 
DoubleWhisky's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Home at Warsaw, Poland, boat in Eastern Med
Boat: Ocean Star 56.1 LR
Posts: 1,841
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hydra View Post
When Med mooring out of ports in tidal areas, it's important to take soundings in the final location intended for the keel. It's not sufficient to check around the boat with a lead line: there could be an isolated rock just under the keel and it isn't pleasant to be awakened in the middle of the night by this rock touching the keel.

Alain

It is very important remark - thank You.
I shouldn't think Med only way, while writing my original post.
Thank You once again
DoubleWhisky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2014, 03:38   #25
Moderator
 
DoubleWhisky's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Home at Warsaw, Poland, boat in Eastern Med
Boat: Ocean Star 56.1 LR
Posts: 1,841
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by Palarran View Post
Great postings guys. Thanks for the hard work.

FWIW, on stern ties we always use the dingy and then bring the line from shore directly to the boat. I've seen a lot of sailors get pulled off their feet onto the rocks swimming from the boat to shore to tie up.

You are very right about this, Palarran
I think, swimming the lines ashore is straight dangerous in most situations...
DoubleWhisky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2014, 03:43   #26
Moderator
 
DoubleWhisky's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Home at Warsaw, Poland, boat in Eastern Med
Boat: Ocean Star 56.1 LR
Posts: 1,841
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Troup View Post
It was magic to be able to anchor securely in a spot where, on the face of it, anchoring would seem impossible.
Personally I think this is a real beauty of the Med mooring thing
DoubleWhisky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2014, 03:51   #27
Senior Cruiser
 
atoll's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: gettin naughty on the beach in cornwall
Boat: 63 custom alloy sloop,macwester26,prout snowgoose 37 elite catamaran!
Posts: 10,585
Images: 75
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleWhisky View Post
You are very right about this, Palarran
I think, swimming the lines ashore is straight dangerous in most situations...
i tried tell this to my scottish wife when she was 7 months pregnant,swimming ashore with the line in her teeth in turkey........she just shrugged and called me wimp
atoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2014, 04:24   #28
Registered User

Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 733
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleWhisky View Post
You are very right about this, Palarran
I think, swimming the lines ashore is straight dangerous in most situations...
But if you leave it in astern on idle then normally the boat stays in position. the anchor has dug in and the chain has some tension. Then someone else can jump in with the floating line and secure it to the shore.
Helm can then go into neutral, job done or they can then throw you the next line.

I don't see that as particularly unsafe if conditions are calmish.
Fuss is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2014, 04:25   #29
Moderator
 
DoubleWhisky's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Home at Warsaw, Poland, boat in Eastern Med
Boat: Ocean Star 56.1 LR
Posts: 1,841
Re: Mediterranean mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
I have on occasion, rowed my anchor out after docking , rather then drop in on the way in astern.
Yes, it is the way to do it, but rather in smaller boat, with not so heavy anchor tackle, of course
DoubleWhisky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2014, 04:27   #30
Moderator
 
DoubleWhisky's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Home at Warsaw, Poland, boat in Eastern Med
Boat: Ocean Star 56.1 LR
Posts: 1,841
Re: Mediterranean mooring

FIERCE CROSSWIND FORCE IN UNITED EFFORT

Imagine Yourself (or just remember) a harbour quite packed with Med moored boats.
The breakwaters are quite low, and the harbour may be quite well protected from waves, but in the same time is rather open to the wind. Howling gusts are hitting the shore and buildings along the quay. The wind turns along the quay and You have thirty plus knots on mast level and only few knots less over the deck. Not all boats have good anchor tackles. Some of them are probably anchored just lousily by their bareboat charter crews. In any moment things can turn wrong often terribly wrong. Any boat dragging her anchor in such a situation is a danger for Your own boat. Your hook, even deeply buried can not withstand the pressure from some other boats with dragging hooks, pushing to Your windward side. When in such a situation it is not enough to care about Your own boat You need to care about others, for Your own sake. It is time to cooperate and take an united effort for safety.
Have a look at the layout of the harbour and discuss the situation with other skippers. My experience is, when one start to organize things, others will follow happily (well, at least most of them).
Most often to the windward of most windward located boat You can find some kind of strongpoint. It can be breakwater, shallow quay at an angle to the main quay or just a pile of rocks.
Most of the boats have on board a long lines for mooring stern to the rocks. You can use them. And all boats have some spare lines and can put them to the good use. So try to arrange for the long lines to be led from the strongpoint to the bows of the windward boats. Best if You can have this lines aiming at some angle forward from the bows, forward of the wind direction. Next thing is to put a lines between the bows of the longest boats in harbour, tying them all together, with not too much tightened lines, but tightly enough to not allow for vicious swings with the wind. Next You can tie the shorter boats bows to the longer ones. When finished, You have the net of lines, protecting the bows from falling off the wind and lessening enormously the strain on anchors. If the anchor on some boat start drag, this boat can be now quite easily and safely secured by the lines led from midship cleats to the bows of neighbouring boats.
You need to remember about other boats seeking for shelter. If the lines of the web are crossing the vacant slot, such a slot must be watched and it is necessary to organize for this. In the case of the boat seeking an shelter entering the harbour, the lines from the slot must to be removed swiftly to allow the newcomer into the slot. They can be rearranged just when the new boat is moored.

It is not very often You need to arrange for such a coordinated effort in the harbour to avoid damages to the boats. On the other hand each two or three years I experienced such a conditions. At least at two occasions we were webbed with other boats for not less than a four or five days with violent winds blowing and we all escaped unscratched thank to united effort of all crews, even if in one case almost half of the anchors gave way, but remained boats kept neighbours on their own hooks.

Oh, and remember if You will be the one to start the arrangements and other will follow, after the wind will settle down, You will have a way too many offers to buy You a beer
DoubleWhisky is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
mediterranean, mooring

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
6 day itinerary in BVI with kids mooring to mooring askdad Atlantic & the Caribbean 15 04-04-2013 10:09
6 day itinerary in BVI with kids mooring to mooring askdad Sailor Logs & Cruising Plans 1 16-03-2013 04:11
Electrified Mooring Field? Mooring Power Mule Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 31 08-04-2010 08:00
Is Mediterranean Climate Turning Caribbean ? GordMay Europe & Mediterranean 0 06-07-2005 10:50

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:34.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.