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Old 22-05-2014, 04:21   #271
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

"flexerquinns", never heard the term, round here, they're known as " deck fluff"

dave
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Old 22-05-2014, 04:49   #272
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

Quote:
For smaller, lighter boat (under 40 feet) it is the way to moor under control, when only other choice is to anchor out (or trying to charge into the slot at extremely high speed - simplest way for unhappy outcome).
I think it was worth reporting in this thread.
I think one more – rather “last resource” – technique is well worth reporting here.
Some time ago we were moored at Astakos (Ionian mainland). There was substantial crosswind (about 30 – 30+ knots, really windy day) and some unpleasant short chop.
The big, quite old, 65 feet, crewed charter yacht came to moor there. As an old one (more than twenty years, I believe), the boat was not equipped with bow thruster. The only available mooring slot at the moment was two or three boats to the leeward from us, and we went out to help with the lines. I met several bots of this class earlier and knew they are mostly without bow thruster and not easily handled backward, so I was really interested how they intend to moor.


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Boats on both sides of slot were without crews on board (it was lunchtime), what made all situation even more interesting.
On the other hand the slot itself was not overly narrow, as vacated earlier by Lagoon 380 (rather tightly packed there, I must admit).
We were sure about intentions of the coming boat, as they made two close approaches to inspect the place, and at the second one they weaved to us. We responded and I placed myself, almost “at attention” just next to the windward bollard, to assure them we are not just occasional onlookers but are ready to take up the mooring lines.

The boat motored downwind a bit, turned to the windward and dropped the anchor exactly in line with a mooring slot. Next she turned towards the slot and motored in our direction. She approached quite slowly, so to maintain a course over the ground aligned with a slot, she needed to have a hull at some angle, bow to windward, to compensate for the drift from wind and chop. It helped (along with overhanging bow and the protruding anchor platform – difficult to call it bowsprit) to lay a chain down in a straight line all the time, without damaging the gelcoat at the bow.
With own bow rather close to the bow of the windward moored yacht the skipper applied some windward rudder, stopping the chain and making the some more revs on engine. The bow was almost instantly stopped by the chain and the huge boat turned almost on a dime. Her bow surely went over the chain of windward moored boat, but not a keel. Before the end of rotation skipper engaged the engine astern, putting swiftly the rudder on the opposite side, and big boat slipped into the slot, aligning herself with her anchor chain. Good, long throw of well coiled windward mooring warp landed the line just at our feet, so we made it fast on bollard without delay. Slack was taken on board swiftly, as well as a slack on anchor chain, so the incoming yacht (well fendered up) barely touched the leeward moored boat’s fenders. Final placement of the boat in the slot was a piece of cake now.

Again, I’m not encouraging anybody to follow, just reporting, as one need to really well know his boat and be sure of own abilities to execute the manouever properly. Anyway – we were left impressed


Cheers,


Tomasz
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Old 22-05-2014, 04:55   #273
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

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Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
"flexerquinns", never heard the term, round here, they're known as " deck fluff"

dave
Nice, but fluff implies softness, and we are talking about these of flexy-springy kind



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Old 22-05-2014, 05:06   #274
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

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Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
"flexerquinns", never heard the term, round here, they're known as " deck fluff"

dave

Oh, oh, and the term is only two days old and born in this thread, so nothing strange it sounds new to You

Cheers,

Tomasz
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Old 22-05-2014, 05:21   #275
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

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Originally Posted by DoubleWhisky View Post
Oh, oh, and the term is only two days old and born in this thread, so nothing strange it sounds new to You

Cheers,

Tomasz

try "deck fluff " in Google Images.... I think we have a good definition already

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Old 22-05-2014, 05:25   #276
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

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Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
try "deck fluff " in Google Images.... I think we have a good definition already

Thank You for the tip.
Deep study of the said problem is well worth some effort
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Old 22-05-2014, 05:25   #277
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

The problem, with all anchor controlled movements, is that if the anchor drags, you are usually so close to everyone that you are then f^&ked.
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Old 22-05-2014, 05:39   #278
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

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Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
The problem, with all anchor controlled movements, is that if the anchor drags, you are usually so close to everyone that you are then f^&ked.
dave
Very true for most situations

Tomasz
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Old 22-05-2014, 12:24   #279
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

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Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
try "deck fluff " in Google Images....

It was really good advice
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Old 22-05-2014, 12:26   #280
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

I went out with one of the Flexer Quinns.
Nice girl.

Her nick name was Deck Fluff...........
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Old 22-05-2014, 12:37   #281
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
The problem, with all anchor controlled movements, is that if the anchor drags, you are usually so close to everyone that you are then f^&ked.
dave
Thought a bit more about it...
Yu are right, of course.
But Your principle is also true for other problems.
Propeller fouled - You are f....d.
Rudder fouled - You are f....d.
Engine stopped dead - You are f....d.
Gear not engaging or not disengaging - You are f....d.
Windlass breaker tripped - You are f....d.
All this Med mooring thing is about movements at close quarters really.
And at close quarters, when anything is going wrong it is a good chance You are f....d.

So may be - just may be - the anchor controlled movements are not so bad at least. With reasonable well holding bottom (You can expect it in most harbours) and with good anchor tackle...
At least the anchor controlled movements were useful in sailing for good several hendred years...

Just thinking...

Cheers

Tomasz
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Old 22-05-2014, 12:39   #282
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

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Originally Posted by weavis View Post
I went out with one of the Flexer Quinns.
Nice girl.

Her nick name was Deck Fluff...........
Oh, You are back?

Already???

Why?????
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Old 22-05-2014, 13:49   #283
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleWhisky View Post
I think one more – rather “last resource” – technique is well worth reporting here.
Some time ago we were moored at Astakos (Ionian mainland). There was substantial crosswind (about 30 – 30+ knots, really windy day) and some unpleasant short chop.
The big, quite old, 65 feet, crewed charter yacht came to moor there. As an old one (more than twenty years, I believe), the boat was not equipped with bow thruster. The only available mooring slot at the moment was two or three boats to the leeward from us, and we went out to help with the lines. I met several bots of this class earlier and knew they are mostly without bow thruster and not easily handled backward, so I was really interested how they intend to moor.


Attachment 81737


Attachment 81738

Boats on both sides of slot were without crews on board (it was lunchtime), what made all situation even more interesting.
On the other hand the slot itself was not overly narrow, as vacated earlier by Lagoon 380 (rather tightly packed there, I must admit).
We were sure about intentions of the coming boat, as they made two close approaches to inspect the place, and at the second one they weaved to us. We responded and I placed myself, almost “at attention” just next to the windward bollard, to assure them we are not just occasional onlookers but are ready to take up the mooring lines.

The boat motored downwind a bit, turned to the windward and dropped the anchor exactly in line with a mooring slot. Next she turned towards the slot and motored in our direction. She approached quite slowly, so to maintain a course over the ground aligned with a slot, she needed to have a hull at some angle, bow to windward, to compensate for the drift from wind and chop. It helped (along with overhanging bow and the protruding anchor platform – difficult to call it bowsprit) to lay a chain down in a straight line all the time, without damaging the gelcoat at the bow.
With own bow rather close to the bow of the windward moored yacht the skipper applied some windward rudder, stopping the chain and making the some more revs on engine. The bow was almost instantly stopped by the chain and the huge boat turned almost on a dime. Her bow surely went over the chain of windward moored boat, but not a keel. Before the end of rotation skipper engaged the engine astern, putting swiftly the rudder on the opposite side, and big boat slipped into the slot, aligning herself with her anchor chain. Good, long throw of well coiled windward mooring warp landed the line just at our feet, so we made it fast on bollard without delay. Slack was taken on board swiftly, as well as a slack on anchor chain, so the incoming yacht (well fendered up) barely touched the leeward moored boat’s fenders. Final placement of the boat in the slot was a piece of cake now.

Again, I’m not encouraging anybody to follow, just reporting, as one need to really well know his boat and be sure of own abilities to execute the manouever properly. Anyway – we were left impressed


Cheers,


Tomasz

Seen that a few times in Greece and it looks amazing! Can only imagine what it looks like if they are a little bit late with tightening up on the chain...
One day I may try to do that on a deserted quay but until then in any wind at all I prefer to toss out the stern anchor and use a turn around the genoa winch to stop me before I hit the quay and use the prop wash over the rudder to keep me straight. We do have on of those full keeled boats where the rudder is almost useless in astern.
Going stern to we only do on a very calm day.
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Old 22-05-2014, 14:06   #284
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

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Seen that a few times in Greece and it looks amazing! Can only imagine what it looks like if they are a little bit late with tightening up on the chain...
One day I may try to do that on a deserted quay but until then in any wind at all I prefer to toss out the stern anchor and use a turn around the genoa winch to stop me before I hit the quay and use the prop wash over the rudder to keep me straight. We do have on of those full keeled boats where the rudder is almost useless in astern.
Going stern to we only do on a very calm day.
You may be right this trick will do for a full keeler to Med moor stern to the quay, but a lot of exercise is necessary, I assume.
On the other hand I would not dare to Med moor long keeler "normal" way...

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Old 22-05-2014, 15:15   #285
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Re: Mediterranean Mooring

MED MOORING WITH TWO ANCHORS IN V

When You are Med mooring in a bay or cove, with long lines to the shore it is sometime obvious, that during some time the wind will change direction. It is not necessary resulting from the expected change of the prevailing wind. More often You are moored in place, when You can expect katabatic wind blowing down the valley or the gorge over Your chosen anchorage. Your bower is usually placed accordingly to the conditions existing at the moment of anchoring, and more, it is probably placed most favourably for the exiting the anchorage if the need to do it will appear.
If You expect the wind to veer (and katabatic wind can be strong and making Your berth untenable) the V anchoring can be an answer. Just take Your spare anchor and ride it out in Your tender towards the expected wind direction. If You have a decent sized Fortress (most popular as a spare anchor) setting it initially will be quite easy job, and with the wind veering increased load should set it finally without a problem, if only the bottom is suitable. Being held by Your bower You do not need to worry about changing a direction of load on the Fortress rode. If it is possible, You can also run the spare long line to the suitable place on shore, to work as stern line together with a Fortress after the change in wind direction. If not possible You can make a decent slack on Your original stern line. In this situation You will be using both anchors as more classic V arrangement. Of course, You will need to adjust chain and lines with the wind veering, but better be prepared early than battle a fight for keeping You station in dark hours of the night.
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