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Old 25-03-2020, 10:16   #61
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Re: Marking your anchor location

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Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
This is the red ball anchor trick, it’s very used fishing in Fl when people have no windlass and want to move to fish close by, it may work on a stick anchor, worth a try anyway
https://www.kingmanyachtcenter.com/y...ttom-now-what/
https://www.boatingmag.com/how-to/using-anchor-ball/
I may be daft or thick but I don't see from those diagrams or description how that technique will give any more advantage than just pulling straight up on the anchor shank from the bow, which is what one is trying to avoid. I'd REALLY need to see Panope film that one before I try it.
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Old 25-03-2020, 10:40   #62
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Re: Marking your anchor location

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Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
I may be daft or thick but I don't see from those diagrams or description how that technique will give any more advantage than just pulling straight up on the anchor shank from the bow, which is what one is trying to avoid. I'd REALLY need to see Panope film that one before I try it.

I agree, but the purpose of that trick is just to give a small boat without a windlass a way to yank the anchor straight up. It's not applicable to those of us with a windlass. Anyway it's not even the windlass, but the boat motion which yanks our anchors. Good way to bend a shank if you overdo this.
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Old 25-03-2020, 10:49   #63
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Re: Marking your anchor location

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I agree, but the purpose of that trick is just to give a small boat without a windlass a way to yank the anchor straight up. It's not applicable to those of us with a windlass. Anyway it's not even the windlass, but the boat motion which yanks our anchors. Good way to bend a shank if you overdo this.
Exactly! And I have done that.
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Old 25-03-2020, 11:08   #64
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Re: Marking your anchor location

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I too have my doubts about the whole ring thing, but I've never tried it, so won't be too critical. I suspect it would work in a certain set of circumstances, but not others.

Several years ago I tried out the ring thing I’ve had on board for years. I was in the very tight anchorage at the east side of Dana Point and using my dinghy deployed my Danforth as a stern anchor dropping it in shallow water a few yards from breakwater. When attempting to retrieve the Danforth I could not motor the boat over it as it was too shallow. I used the ring device from the dinghy and I think I was able to get it down the rode but the Danforth had dug in deeply. The ring may not have reached the crown. Anyway I could not pull the anchor up from the dinghy. I ended marking it with a fender and up casting it off. Later the harbor patrol was able to get a bigger boat over it and did retrieve it but with a lot of horsepower and even then with difficulty. They did not use a ring, just a vertical pull.
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Old 25-03-2020, 14:46   #65
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Re: Marking your anchor location

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On the other hand, if your anchor (a Rochna, or something similar with a large ring at the rear) gets hooked on a rock ledge or a chain pile or?? I seriously doubt your "...6" ring", split apart to surround your chain rode and then slid down your rode and onto the shank of the anchor, will get back far enough on the shank to pull the anchor backwards.
And how does a “6" ring", split apart to surround your chain rode” not open when pressure is exerted to pull out a stuck anchor? I’m skeptical.

I’ve read reports of this being done with a small loop of chain around the main chain. Never seen it done, maybe it can work. I’m even more skeptical. I reckon at best the device will get near the buried anchor then start lifting the chain and achieve nix. If my boat can’t lift the anchor, these devices have no chance.

I guess if stuck in rocks or debris, the boat may lift the shank enough to allow the device to drop close enough to the front of the anchor to be effective. But that’s a considerable leap of faith.

If I had to deploy a trip line, I like the idea of small cable ties to keep the trip line against the chain, that will easily snap under pressure. But what a ball-ache deploying and retrieving. Rather anchor somewhere where recovery is easy

I agree with some sentiment here that anchor bouys are a selfish use of anchorage space. I’ve often had to retrieve from under another boat - there is always a way. Truth is, if there is a chance of another boat drifting over my anchor, if the wind shifts, I could just as easily drift over his.
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Old 25-03-2020, 19:50   #66
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Re: Marking your anchor location

Yup, I just don't think this ring thing makes much sense, except in a very narrow set of circumstances.

The most effective place for a trip line to be pre-positioned is at the leading edge of the anchor. Most anchors have attachment points already in place (holes, usually) for this application. It's still a crap shoot as to whether you can get the anchor out, but logically, that's the best pre-position to start from.

I've always used a float to manage my trip line in the very rare instances that I've deployed it. And I've always been alone in these anchorages, so the float interfered with no one.

In thinking about this, it seems to me this is the most likely scenario; being alone, or with very few boats. Why? Because it is an undesirable anchorage to begin with.

I have only ever deployed a trip line/float where I had serious concerns about debris on the bottom. These are not anchorages that I choose lightly to begin with, and by extension, they are rarely visited by anchoring boats. So most of the time I think there's a good bet I'll be alone.

In these cases, a float is no issue at all. It's the easiest to set up, to retrieve, and to actually use should you need to actually employ the trip.

After all this discussion, I think I'll just stick to my float .
(But certainly not to simply mark my anchor).
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Old 25-03-2020, 20:42   #67
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Re: Marking your anchor location

I have at times used an anchor float (milk jug and very, very light string). On occasion with say 100' of rode out my own boat can be right on top of my anchor as I drift around my 238' circle (38' for the boat).

Now the next guy comes into the anchorage and anchors where he thinks there is lots of room without knowing he is way too close to me when winds or tides change....... I've actually been hit in this situation which prompted my use of such a float.
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Old 25-03-2020, 22:31   #68
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Re: Marking your anchor location

So here's my take on it. There are at least two ways I'd approach this to avoid the anchor chain sliding along the hull on the way past the anchor to get ahead of it to pull it out with the trip line, if you're going to run the trip line back to the boat and not to a floating buoy (but the buoy is still there at the bitter end on the foredeck.) Both methods involve NOT aiming the boat directly at the anchor and not taking up the rode until the anchor is free. With a smaller boat I'd walk the anchor rode back through a stern chock with the boat headed about, I dunno, 30 degrees or so away from anchor. This would mean getting some momentum from the engine or from yanking on the rode to get her moving (that would be a very small boat.) Simultaneously the trip line is run somewhere from the stern as well, taking up slack as you go. In this case you don't take up slack on the anchor rode and you are careful to not give the engine a boost until the anchor rode is going off your beam or quarter. Once you are past the anchor pay out the slack on the trip line and cleat off its bitter end. Use the engine idling forward to pull the trip line, not the rode. Once the anchor is free, walk the anchor rode back to the bow and take it up.
For a larger, or smaller, boat where you will not be walking any rode anywhere, I'd motor up at a broader angle and let the anchor rode pull the bow around as you continue motoring slowly at the same angle by adding some rudder to hold it out. Eventually the boat will make its way around ahead of the anchor, roughly 180 degrees if you are really good, bow pointing back at anchor, without the chain grating along the hull. With the anchor rode slack, (and no trip line under the boat!) put the engine in slow reverse so that the slack in the trip line, cleated off, is taken up and pulls the anchor out before the slack in the rode is taken up. This can still work with a full keel that wants to veer off in reverse, you don't have to go too far and the angle does not have to be a perfect 180 from where you were. Engine in neutral, raise anchor and take up on trip line slack as it comes up.
Now in my mind I am thinking of the Downeast 38 and Catalina 36 I used to sail ages ago, so my memory of the boat's responses may be a little off. Take this all with a grain of salt, YMMV, but that's my strategy based on my (way) past experiences. Feel free to critique all you bigger boat owners!
Now, for me, if at any point I don't see the boat going around the way I expect OR trip line and rode look like they MAY get tangled, I'd stop the whole process and start back at zero. Wind and/or currents may make this unworkable. In that case I'd drop all the rode, release the trip line and its buoy from the foredeck to float free, motor or sail around and come right up on it, grabbing it with the boat hook while passing, cleat the trip line on the stern before the slack is taken up and let the boat's forward momentum pull the anchor straight out backwards, then take up on the whole thing. That I know works.
I'm cooped up in my shelter in place right now, but I'm jonesing to get back out on the water and motivated to get out there and make some movies of it!
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Old 26-03-2020, 10:18   #69
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Re: Marking your anchor location

After posting that treatise I got to thinking that clearly in most situations just pulling from directly above or slightly ahead of the anchor, with the trip line, will probably do it, with out having to get so far ahead of the anchor, and hence not much danger of scraping the hull. Most boats have enough overhang on the bow to allow it. But with the Downeast 38, with the bowsprit, even though the bow roller was out on the sprit a bit, I always wanted to avoid any chance of the rode, or in this case a trip line, leaning on the bobstay.
I was just thinking of one of the shots Noelex had of an anchor fouled with its flukes under a slab of concrete and in my own case a CQR jammed well in large rocks, pulling straight up even with the tripline may not do the trick.
Also forgot to mention that one also needs to have a buoy and line ready for the bitter end of a rode, especially if it is all chain, in case it all has to be dumped. I've never tried to retrieve a couple hundred feet of chain and anchor, but without a buoy on the bitter end... ugh, I can't imagine any easy way to tackle that one... you'd need some chain hooks handy I guess... and a bow roller with enough room for a doubled up rode to fit and still allowing half of it run.
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Old 27-03-2020, 07:31   #70
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Re: Marking your anchor location

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This^^^^^

Seriously! I have seen people pick up anchor floats believing them to be moorings! A humourous situation if you are there to watch, a potential disaster if you are not.

In general (and there are exceptions) anchor floats will be more of a PITA for you and your neighbors than they are worth. Moving around an anchorage at night, either by yacht or dinghy, becomes really hazardous if there are unlit anchor floats scattered about.

If someone wraps your float line around their prop, and trips your anchor at 2AM on a windy night, you BOTH have a serious problem. This usually isn't much of an issue in mooring fields because the mooring balls are expected, and are typically very close to the bow of the moored boat.

I tend to see anchor floats used by the same people who put out 160 feet of rode in 10 feet of water in a crowded anchorage. How to win friends... NOT.

For those rare occasions where a buoy makes sense, a gallon OJ jug (bright orange plastic) with the line through the jug's handle and a 2 or 3 lb sash weight on the end keeps the buoy above the anchor in the absence of strong winds or currents.

If you feel you need a trip line, you can just use one deeper than the water depth, and lash it the boat end of it with some small stuff to the chain. Use dacron or nylon, and it will sink with the chain, and be out of the way, but available if needed. In a crowded anchorage, this is a much more "polite" solution than a float.



Seriously... This is where you find something humorous to watch??
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Old 27-03-2020, 07:41   #71
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Re: Marking your anchor location

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Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
What purpose does an anchor float serve? I’ve always wondered that and can’t come up with a good answer.
I have wondered the same. Best I could figure is to keep others from dropping on your anchor or rode, but that makes no sense as they'd then fall back on you.

I am with Mike & others--I see no need, and it hogs more room in a busy anchorage. It's not necessary except in exceptional circumstances such as with a trip line.

Last summer I watched a German with a bullhorn chasing a huge flotilla away from his anchor all afternoon. He was successful, with a lot of ill will, but eventually left anyhow as he was surrounded by partying Chechs.

Edited to add that marking your anchor location seems to be more common in the Caribbean & less so in the Med.
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Old 27-03-2020, 07:48   #72
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Re: Marking your anchor location

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Don't please unless you are in an uncrowded anchorage.
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Old 27-03-2020, 08:02   #73
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Re: Marking your anchor location

We used to sail with a dog. She was well trained as to when to bark, and when not to. If a boat was about to anchor too close, we would say "birds in the rigging" and she would let loose with her sharp salute, and the boat would decide to find a quieter place. Seriously, i can't figure out why about 1/3 of boaters want to be real close tp another boat. Do they have a need to snuggle?
We rarely mark our anchor, but in shallow anchorages we appreciate it when others do. We like to know the other boats swing radius so we can allow for appropriate privacy. I agree that 7:1, all chain in a protected anchorage is excessive, but disagree that boats swing together.

In 15 years of cruising, we see lots of situations in which there are conflicts. Tide change currents, gusty winds, no current or wind, etc. On moorings in Isla Taboga, Pan. We took a picture of five boats on separate moorings, all pointed at each other in 10kt wind, 2" swell. At anchor, there would have been quite a conflict.
In Huatulco, a wind caused everyones rode to realign one night, ans we spent several hours fending off an unoccupied beautiful ketch. Moved at dawn.

The other reason to mark: In crowded anchorages, several times our anchor has been dredged from the bottom by other boats trying to either set, or retrieve their anchors. This has allowed our boat to drift a distance until the anchor reset itself.
Don't complain others are taking up too much space by marking their anchor, go find another place with more room. Why do you want to be looking in the other boats ports anyway. Leave a little space.
While we rarely bouy our anchor, we do appreciate others who do.
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Old 27-03-2020, 08:15   #74
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Re: Marking your anchor location

I don’t use an anchor float in “single-hook anchorages” (for many of the reasons mentioned) BUT I frequently use one (or even two) in places where we hook bow and stern. This helps guard against people inadvertently laying their anchor over your rode and/or pulling up your hook. It also clearly outlines the viable space. And in these locations we are usually quite packed in with boats (hence the need for two anchors).

Side note: I love Mike’s block/weight concept, since I always spend time adjusting the line length for each new depth.
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Old 27-03-2020, 10:02   #75
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Re: Marking your anchor location

Does anyone but me use an app like Anchorwatch to mark the location of the anchor when you drop it?
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