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Old 10-03-2017, 14:24   #16
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Re: Chain too far gone?

Since you are re-galvanizing,why not cut out the iffy links & join the good section(s) back together by cutting & welding links before galvanizing.

The heavy rust appears to be only in short sections that have lain in a pool of water in anchor locker IMHO.

I'm no chain expert,but,from your pics,there appears to be a lot of good chain with negligible wear in the links.


Len
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Old 10-03-2017, 14:36   #17
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Re: Chain too far gone?

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Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
In your place,, I'd stretch the rode out on a dock and inspect the whole length. to me, it appears that there are some relatively short areas where the rust is serious, but with it piled up, you can't see how many, how long or how bad they are.

If the majority of the chain appears ok for regalvanizing, I'd consider cutting out the bad spots and rejoining the good parts with high quality joining links, then take the lot to the galvanizeria. At this point, the usual folks will pipe up with arguments against using joining links. Please take the time to check the several long threads about this subject. For anything but >G-43 chain, the links are strong as the chain itself.

BTW, don't bother with cold galvo... it is useless on chain that is in use.

Jim
I agree on the joining links. There is no need to fear high quality links as confirmed in this test.
https://coxengineering.sharepoint.com/Pages/Clinks.aspx

/ Len
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Old 10-03-2017, 15:11   #18
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Re: Chain too far gone?

Definitely cutting off the last 100'. Should I cut the 7', 23', and 27' pieces too?
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Old 12-03-2017, 14:50   #19
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Re: Chain too far gone?

Can't just go on visual. it can look bad but of all just thin surface rust rust and rust and the diameter of the metal is still there then should be no problem.

I'll bet the bad 100 feet was on the anchor with anchoring in rocks or maybe the bottom of the pike tgat never got used. Rocks and coral dine on galvanizing.


Going with 225 of chain can get you around the world. Worst case when your in 100 feet of water add 90 feet of line (only chain on the bottom for chafe) and you'll be fine.

One thing to consider if buying new is what to buy. Usually one size smaller of Hi Test is,stronger than proof coil and lighter which is nice on a cat. Lose the benefit of catenary weight, but can just put out more chain.

How big is the cat?
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Old 12-03-2017, 15:24   #20
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Re: Chain too far gone?

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Originally Posted by Davidhoy View Post
Thinwater, can you elaborate on what you mean by "detriment"? I recently picked up an FX-85 as a backup to my primary Rocna, and in talking with the guys are Fortress (I can literally see their factory out the window of my office!), they recommend about 20ft of chain, then a nylon rode. You need the stretch of the nylon to absorb shock, the weight of the chain to get a good angle of pull on the shank, and the wear-resistance of the chain especially of rocky or coral bottoms. I'd think that dyneema would be a less-from-ideal material for an anchor rode, given its light weight and very low stretch...

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David
Good questions. However, I have been working on this with Fortress people on this, I have done a lot of anchor testing for publication, and I'm not guessing.

Chain makes the shank sink before the flukes because the anchor is very light. This prevents the flukes from biting, particularly in very soft mud. They have a picture of this on their web site.

One of the main reasons they like chain is to get the anchor down if there is current. Not relevant for most kedge and V tandem applications.

No, 20 feet of chain does not provide catenary. It's not nearly enough to make any difference under load. That is a myth. As for setting, Fortress anchors get a faster initial set at short scope, so once again, the chain is a detriment.

Dyneema is a very poor rode material. But I did not suggest that. I suggested a 20' over-strength Dyneema leader with a chafe guard as a replacement for 20 feet of chain.

Yes, chain has greater wear resistance. However, I specifically said this was for kedge (an anchor used to pull the boat off the mud, for example) only. I did not imply this was for the main anchor. The method is also useful for a V tandem in soft mud, since V anchors do not saw across the bottom and because there is little to cut the rode. In any event, the Dyneema/chafe guard combination is at least 20 times more cut resistant than the rope you are using, which with only 20 feet of chain, can easily loop on a coral head. If this is a concern to you, use at least 100' of chain.

This is a specialized tip. It makes the anchor MUCH easier to take out by dinghy for kedge or V tandem. I am not suggesting it for anything else or for any other anchor. I believe if you think through what I have said, you will find the logic is sound for the specific set of cases I suggested.
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Old 13-03-2017, 00:06   #21
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Re: Chain too far gone?

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Originally Posted by thinwater View Post
Good questions. However, I have been working on this with Fortress people on this, I have done a lot of anchor testing for publication, and I'm not guessing.
Thanks! Appreciate the clear, concise explanation. Makes sense now :-)

-David
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Old 13-03-2017, 05:14   #22
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Re: Chain too far gone?

What Jim said. Cut out the bad bits, regalvanise if the chain has not been regalvinised too many times already (depends on the type of chain but I think three or four times was the max from memory). Put some quality links in to rejoin the bits and away you go.

I did all this a while back and I am still alive so far.
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Old 05-07-2017, 18:28   #23
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Chain too far gone?

Towing a rusty chain behind a jeep, through sand, is an expedient sandblasting technique.
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Old 05-07-2017, 19:14   #24
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Re: Chain too far gone?

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Towing a rusty chain behind a jeep, through sand, is an expedient sandblasting technique.
Beat me to it!

I actually don't think any of that chain is too far gone. That's really just surface rust.
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Old 05-07-2017, 19:49   #25
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Re: Chain too far gone?

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Beat me to it!

I actually don't think any of that chain is too far gone. That's really just surface rust.
Although it may need the 4WD sandblast first.
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Old 06-07-2017, 04:33   #26
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Re: Chain too far gone?

Even with your 44' cat, like me, you probably don't keep a jeep onboard. However according to a ahem a recent survey- 100% of coastal jeep owners, asked nicely, not only will help you gleefully they also know just the place to go.
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