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Old 30-11-2010, 10:21   #16
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Canoe stern/double enders exempted from #2?
I think yes to a large extent as there's no or at least a very minimum of blocking of the waves force... like the bow it'll part the wave to a large extent... but as stated above.... a strong and very well lashed rudder essential
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Old 30-11-2010, 10:22   #17
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This is all another really good reason to own a ketch - preferably with a nice long keel and skeg hung rudder. You'll lie head to wind like you are bolted to the bottom of the harbor.

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Old 30-11-2010, 10:32   #18
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Like every heavy weather tactic, if one is considering a stern to anchor the whole picture needs to be part of the decision making process. Like Carl says, it might make sense in a protected anchorage with limited fetch where the main force will be wind and not wave action.

In a situation where the boat is exposed to more wave action a stern to mooring might not make sense.
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Old 30-11-2010, 10:53   #19
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Most Yachts are going to be more aerodynamically stable when anchored from the stern.
This will result in less shearing which would reduce the loads on the anchor, but the steady state aerodynamic drag is higher with the wind from the stern than from the bow and the wave force is considerably higher.
My feeling is that the net result of these 2 opposing effects is that, most boats, would be better, in most conditions, anchored from the bow, but like all estimations real measurements can sometimes prove them wrong.
My yacht has a very strong stern cleat, but without a strain gage, and the will to swing the boat around in the next strong blow I guess I will never know for sure.

I used to sometimes anchor my previous yacht from the stern for a better view or to suit the solar panels. The only problem is every second boat that enters the anchorage wants to know “whats wrong” . As a bonus they did often anchor further away from the “funny boat that isn’t facing the correct way”.
I am surprised more yachts don’t at least occasionally anchor from the stern, but for reasons other than storm survival.
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Old 30-11-2010, 12:08   #20
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The only problem is every second boat that enters the anchorage wants to know “whats wrong” . As a bonus they did often anchor further away from the “funny boat that isn’t facing the correct way”.
That is something I had considered as a possibility. I would certainly look and maybe ask if I saw one boat in the harbor facing the opposite direction from all the rest.

The bonus might make it worth the constant Q & A session. Maybe you could tell the questioners that you anchored stern to because the last time your anchor dragged the bow cleats were damaged when you smacked the boat anchored behind you (let them figure out how you got turned around). That would guarantee a nice, clear area all around.
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Old 30-11-2010, 12:19   #21
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In storm survival situations, I would never anchor from the stern. I have set a stern anchor only a few times, and it is generally a hassle because I am not set up to do it on Exit Only.

I cannot imagine a situation where I would be better off with an anchor off the stern except for the purpose of limiting swinging in adverse current, tide, or wind shift that could place the yacht in danger.

I have run off using drogues off the stern, and that works well on Exit Only. But that is not being at anchor, and there is lots of sea room.

If the anchorage was an open roadstead with breaking seas, I would much rather take the seas on the bow than on the stern. The loads on the anchor would be much greater in breaking seas if they were coming up against the stern rather than the bows.
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Old 30-11-2010, 12:28   #22
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Why not to anchor from the stern

When anchored of Key West years ago in my wee swing keel boat confused winds preceeding a squall caused my rode to hang on the keel. Sideways was not the way to ride out a blow so in a panic grabbed the bitterend and tried to sprint around the deck. I didn't make it and ended up stern tied. I yelled to my wife to move anything heavy forward and I sat in the bow pulpit to watch the building sea slam the flat transom and deposit alot of water into the cockpit. Obviously that boat wasn't up to it.

The canoe sterned Norsea I have now would fare better sea wise but I wouldn't trust the large cleat there or the fact there is no chafe protection. I've never seen a rear sampson post.

Ps; I have had to back out of an anchorage in a gale.
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Old 30-11-2010, 12:45   #23
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Maybe you could tell the questioners that you anchored stern to because the last time your anchor dragged the bow cleats were damaged when you smacked the boat anchored behind you (let them figure out how you got turned around). That would guarantee a nice, clear area all around.
Great idea
We get hit about 2 to 3 times a year from dragging boats. Fortunately with a tough aluminium boat I have only suffered a couple of slight chips in paint.
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Old 30-11-2010, 13:04   #24
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This is all another really good reason to own a ketch - preferably with a nice long keel and skeg hung rudder. You'll lie head to wind like you are bolted to the bottom of the harbor.

Carl
Based on reports from ketch owners such as Carl's indicating successful use of the mizzen sail to prevent sailing about at anchor, I decided to try Banner Bay Marine's "FinDelta" anchoring sail on my sloop-rigged Pacific Seacraft (i.e., "modified fin" keel, skeg hung rudder). The attached pic is from their web site, but there are a number of other similar offerings out there including make-your-own kits, so I'm not meaning to endorse any particular brand. I'm not thrilled with the idea of subjecting the rudder to the forces involved with anchoring stern-to or with the notion of taking cockpits full of water, so I'm hoping this riding sail might do the trick. I haven't tried the sail out yet, so I'd be interested in hearing whether this type of approach might be a better alternative than anchoring stern-to, and how well this type of sail has worked for anyone who's tried it.
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Old 30-11-2010, 13:33   #25
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This is a very important topic.
Not all boats can safely anchor from the stern but the valuble lesson here is that most boats will veer wildly and jerk on the rode in strong winds when anchored from the bow.

The question is, will you do something about it?
Or figure to loose the boat when that big storm comes?

The loads associated with a jerk (the technical term, not those people) are huge compared with stern anchoring or adding drag to hold the boat steady.

My boat has no provision for using a riding sail (it's a powerboat), no keel (it's jet drive with 22" draft) and sails around like a drunken sailor.

I did some experiments with a large kite flown from the stern and that worked well but was not practical.

After years of testing the best thing is a large conical drogue closely tied to the aft corner of the swim platform combined with an elastic mooring system used as a chain snubber.

The key thing is that any snubber must be able to survive a hurricane.
You can't change that stuff in a storm.

Reading about boats lost due to a failed snubber line is heart breaking.
I have yet to see a storm capable snubber in use on another boat.
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Old 30-11-2010, 13:35   #26
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The stern of most cruising boats is significantly overloaded. Plus some recent designs place much of the buoyancy far aft. These issues make taking seas on the stern problematic. Then there's the reverse transom and open transom of some boats....
Buoyancy aft would be good, if you're anchored stern-to. Means you would be lifted more vigorously over waves.
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Old 30-11-2010, 14:08   #27
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a strong and very well lashed rudder essential
Why?

The water in waves moves up and down, not towards you. Why would there be any unusual strains on the rudder?
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Old 30-11-2010, 14:13   #28
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Why?

The water in waves moves up and down, not towards you. Why would there be any unusual strains on the rudder?
It must have been my imagination earlier this month: the waves were crashing against the stern while the ship was moving forward at 18 knots.
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Old 30-11-2010, 14:29   #29
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It must have been my imagination earlier this month: the waves were crashing against the stern while the ship was moving forward at 18 knots.
If they break, they will topple over. In this case, some water does move towards you. But underwater where your rudder is -- never. Unless I deeply misunderstand how waves work.
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Old 30-11-2010, 16:19   #30
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G'DAy all,

Another interesting discussion! And I'm inclined to agree with Dockhead's general analysis. In any somewhat protected anchorage, even in storm conditions, large breaking seas are uncommon, whilst sailing about violently is for us a normal, if upsetting, condition.

For those who postulate that the impact upon the stern of a possible breaking wave will excessively load the ground tackle... consider the position of the boat as it fetches up at the end of a big yaw. At that time, the wave train will be striking the flat side of the bow, not the pointy bit! So, similar loading might well occur.

So, in general, it seems like stern-to anchoring has some attractive aspects. But, I've been trying to work out just how one actually does this, barring carrying a second bower anchor, chain and windlass in the stern of the boat. Just how would you re-lead the chain from the bow to the stern where you would then somehow attach your bridle? For this argument, lets assume that there are adequately strong cleats available on the quarters. And then, how would you recover the anchor, especially if you had to leave whilst the conditions were still fierce? Seems pretty daunting to me, and I'd love to hear how others might approach the situation.

In the case of Insatiable II, the situation is exacerbated by our longish sugar scoop transom. Mostly I quite like having it, but it does interfere with stern anchor recovery! But that's not YOUR problem!

Cheers,

Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II lying Coffs Harbour, NSW, Oz, rolling our guts out
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