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Old 16-01-2015, 07:00   #1
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Anchor Trip Line

I was curious about technique when the need for a anchor trip line emerges. I have a nice anchorage from a view perspective but also has rocks below that like to eat my anchor (don't ask me how I know). When faced with possible rocks or logs I use a 3/8" line attached to the top of my Delta and to a small fender which also somewhat marks anchor location. Does anyone use a much longer trip line and bring it back to the boat as opposed to a float so that retrieval doesn't involve getting the boat hook out to snag the floating fender? Seems like the risk of tangling would increase but I figured I'd ask.
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Old 16-01-2015, 07:23   #2
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

Trip lines are fine in secluded anchorages, bit a pain in the @$$ when crowded. Binging it back to the boat could be a good idea, but could tangle with your main rode.

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Old 16-01-2015, 07:25   #3
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

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Originally Posted by scottthardin View Post
...................
Does anyone use a much longer trip line and bring it back to the boat as opposed to a float so that retrieval doesn't involve getting the boat hook out to snag the floating fender? Seems like the risk of tangling would increase but I figured I'd ask.
Actually, many like myself use a far shorter trip line that remains under water and without a concern for snaging anything. I'm most often in fairly warm and shallow water so I can quickly free dive to secure my short trip line on the rare occasion that it's needed. This may seem useless as one would think that I could just free dive to free the anchor, but I find that I don't usually have the physical strength or leverage without the line pulled from the deck.

In addition, long trip lines can become ensnarled within bottom debris even in more tangles than the rode alone.
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Old 16-01-2015, 12:48   #4
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

I use a trip line run through the loop in a round fender. Rather that tying it to the fender I have a small weight on the free end of the line. Not enough to dislodge the anchor but enough to keep the fender (ball) more or less directly over the anchor. The line needs to be longer than the maximum depth of the water but shorter than twice the depth.

The reason I do it this way is that I'm usually in tidal waters and having a line long enough for high tide leaves enough loose line at low tide to tangle with the boat.

Yes, I have to run the boat to the float and pick up the line with a boat hook but it works for me.

Diving for a trip line seems like a lot of trouble, especially if it's cold and/or the water is murky.
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Old 16-01-2015, 12:55   #5
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

Running the trip line back to the boat is something I hadn't thought of. Seems like it would work. Doubtful that it would tangle with the anchor rode as it can't wrap around the rode unless the anchor does a 360 degree roll on the bottom. Possibly it could wrap around the anchor itself though somewhat limited once the anchor buries itself in the bottom. Biggest negative I can see is having a 200' plus trip line lying about the boat when not in use.
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Old 16-01-2015, 13:31   #6
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

A long trip line could wrap around the keel, the rudder or the propeller at the change of tide. Sometimes, it happens with rope rodes (don't ask how I know).

I prefer to have a short trip line and fasten the "higher" end to the chain, with some slack: there is no float on the surface to catch propellers.

But this line can get caught on the bottom. It happened twice to me. Until now, I always managed to get the anchor, the chain and the trip line back on the surface.

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Old 16-01-2015, 14:01   #7
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Re: Anchor Trip Line



May work. Can use a large shackle for the ring.
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Old 16-01-2015, 14:01   #8
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
I use a trip line run through the loop in a round fender. Rather that tying it to the fender I have a small weight on the free end of the line. Not enough to dislodge the anchor but enough to keep the fender (ball) more or less directly over the anchor. The line needs to be longer than the maximum depth of the water but shorter than twice the depth. ........................
.................................................. Diving for a trip line seems like a lot of trouble, especially if it's cold and/or the water is murky.
I use Rwidman's plan, as he describes here, when I am in a place that is known to present hazards for fowling my anchor, such as log snags and rocks. I leave my short line that requires the diving for unexpected and unusual occasions. I've actually only had my anchor fowled in a manner that I could not raise it with my manual windlass on about a half dozen times over my more than four decades of anchoring out from Maine to the Bahamas. Two of those times I ended up cutting my anchor away along with about twenty feet of fowled chain. Both of the times were when the chain was wrapped in turbid water with a strong current. One was among some dumped cement and rebar and another in a large root system. A trip line would not have given me much chance in these situations, but possibly,- certainly not a condition for diving. The other times were easy lifts with the trip line, but by coincidence, never with the set float, but with an easy dive following the chain and carrying a line to my short trip line. A big factor for me is my average anchoring depth at about 12' MLW.
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Old 16-01-2015, 14:07   #9
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

We use a 1.5 meter long stainless cable attached to a small float (pictured). It's always there, makes the anchor easy to spot from the surface and easy to dive on. If the anchor becomes stuck, it's easy to dive down and attach a line. We have two types of scuba gear aboard Hookah 12v and tanks just in case I need to go down a little deeper, but usually the anchor can be reached via free dive without difficulty. Since our minimum comfort depth for anchoring is 3.5-4 meters, the float always sits well below the surface so as not to interfere with passing boats.


We don't like it when we see folks in anchorages using floating trip lines, they are an accident waiting to happen. A passing boat can easily become entangled and pull out the anchor. Or, some knucklehead will think it's a mooring resulting in a similar outcome. Stuff can and does happen while you're ashore enjoying the day.
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Old 16-01-2015, 16:38   #10
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

I would think if you are going to use a surface bouy tripline,or a tripline to your boat,it should be sinking rope,as used by lobster fishermen.
Sinking(leaded) rope is the reason you can skin by single pot bouys on Maine coast.
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Old 16-01-2015, 16:46   #11
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

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Old 16-01-2015, 16:57   #12
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

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Originally Posted by Kenomac View Post
We don't like it when we see folks in anchorages using floating trip lines, they are an accident waiting to happen. A passing boat can easily become entangled and pull out the anchor. Or, some knucklehead will think it's a mooring resulting in a similar outcome. Stuff can and does happen while you're ashore enjoying the day.
Agreed. Last time I used a float on a trip line, a Bayliner came along and tied off to my float. Must have thought it was a mooring buoy.

That was years ago. Lesson learned.
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Old 16-01-2015, 16:59   #13
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

Both nylon and dacron lines sink. I think the special sinking ropes sold to fishermen are to replace plain polypropylene lines, commonly used due to low price which do float.

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Old 16-01-2015, 17:21   #14
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

Ive often tied the trip line to the chain and lowered it into the water. I use about 15 meters of line and tie it to the chain at the 14 meter mark (or thereabouts with some slack). I guess it could get tangled, but hasnt so far the few times i,ve used it. Maybe cable tieing it to the chain at intervals might make for a tidy option.

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Old 16-01-2015, 19:03   #15
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Re: Anchor Trip Line

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Originally Posted by deblen View Post
I would think if you are going to use a surface bouy tripline,or a tripline to your boat,it should be sinking rope,as used by lobster fishermen.
Sinking(leaded) rope is the reason you can skin by single pot bouys on Maine coast.
You must have missed my post #4. The weight on the free end keeps the line sunk. The line comes straight up from the anchor and goes straight down again after going through the loop in the float. And, nylon line sinks anyway.
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