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Old 12-05-2010, 15:58   #1
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Anchor Cable

Anchor rodes typically come in 3 types on recreational sailboats. 1. All nylon rode, which is best used on dinghies and the like.
2. A combination of a length of chain either spliced or shackled to a nylon rode.
3. All chain, from the anchor to the hawsepipe.

Each of these has their relative merits. However, why is anchor cable made of steel wire rope not more popular?

Steel wire rope is cheap, strong, chafe resistant, easy to store, and readily available. The only issue is stowage. It seems like it would be the ideal choice for boats over 30', where hauling in an anchor by hand is impractical.

I think that a lot of commercial boats use this system, so why not recreational?
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Old 12-05-2010, 16:34   #2
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My guesses:

- pain to store / loops too big
- windlasses
- how do you pay out half your wire and "cleat it off". i don't use the windlass as a lazy man's cleet; chain hook into the chain on a three strand nylon through a fairlead to the sampson posts. no idea how you'd rig a snubber line to a wire.
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Old 12-05-2010, 17:16   #3
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Seen the same question before here - search the threads, you will get your answers there.

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Old 12-05-2010, 18:47   #4
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I have been on boats that anchor this way before and they have a large drum of wire up on the foredeck. They do not need to make off the rode since it is on the drum at all times.

Some reasons that I see it not being good for a small sailboat:
The drum takes up a lot of space and is quite heavy and will put a lot of weight up high.
Wire rope has poor shock absorption and it is hard to put a snubber on one.
I am not aware of anyone who make a winch for a drum in the right size.
Corrosion is a bit different since wire rope effectively has much more surface area for the volume of metal. For this reason, people tend to pour oil on it a lot.

It certainly works but only on larger boas in my opinion. It is quite common of fishing boats since they simply unhook their trawl, hook on the anchor and toss it over.
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Old 12-05-2010, 19:13   #5
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I bought a Goiot windlass on line last year. It takes 10mm chain. Does anyone know of a supplier in the US. BBB and other US type chain will not fit.
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Old 13-05-2010, 13:23   #6
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Change the gypsy perhaps?

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Old 13-05-2010, 16:23   #7
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I found a manufacturer that would provide a custom gypsy. It was prohibitivly expensive. I would rather find a sypplier for 10mm chain.
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Old 13-05-2010, 18:27   #8
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I think Vetus may be able to suppy 10mmchain in US.

Sam, I found a Goiot manual windlass as well (eventually). In fact I have 2 as I got one for (in essence) next to nothing.
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Old 15-05-2010, 15:34   #9
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If Maggi have retailer, they will deliver.

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Old 16-05-2010, 10:27   #10
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Trawl boats use wire rope for anchor rode. Tulsa winch is the winch of choice..hydraulic or electric. Inexpensive...20,000#'s for $2500 [rebuilt]. SS Cable needs no oil and weight to strength ratio beats all options.
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Old 16-05-2010, 17:34   #11
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Trawl boats use wire rope for anchor rode...
How often do trawlers anchor?

As a matter of perspective, I've spent over 2,000 nights at anchor, as a cruiser.
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Old 16-05-2010, 18:29   #12
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why we don't play with commercial toys

here's one that handles chain, cable and rope. it will handle up to 160mm chain, and has a rated pull up to 30 tons. Most of the big boys buy them in pairs.
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Old 17-05-2010, 03:25   #13
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A common configuration is the two large hydrolic winches [re:Bash] aft the cabin and a smaller electric winch as an emergency winch to pick up the trawl in the event the main fails. Normally the anchor is pulled by either one of these with the lead to the anchor going up the bulward to the bow.
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Old 17-05-2010, 04:47   #14
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here's one that handles chain, cable and rope. it will handle up to 160mm chain, and has a rated pull up to 30 tons. Most of the big boys buy them in pairs.
Hey Bash,

Would I need to re-inforce the foredeck of my 41 footer to mount that critter
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Old 17-05-2010, 05:13   #15
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Again, does anyone know of a US supplier for 10mm anchor chain?
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