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Old 22-03-2019, 03:41   #31
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

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Originally Posted by Stu Jackson View Post
Right, skip. Just showing a variation idea. The loops he said were easier to make than buying and installing eye bolts in the transom.
Thanks for that. I'll look at my buddy's boat - I bet that's why he did that as well.

It hadn't even occurred to me that a dink would come without lifting points; I'd never had one, nor noticed one which didn't (most of our friends use Davits, and no lift harness is involved)...
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Old 22-03-2019, 04:25   #32
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

With apologies for perhaps thread drift, my lifting system, I believe, on our particular boat, has caused a structural failure.

I believe this to be unique to the Walker Bay Genesis we have, not for other solid dinghies or inflatables (soft bottoms), with the folding-transom hinges being immediately above the failure point.

Discussion of that issue is here:

Walker Bay Genesis 10' structural failure - Cruisers & Sailing Forums

Note that our davit lifting points are NOT what we use to lift aside, as they are poorly positioned for 3-point lift harness; I suspect the same issue would result for anyone else attempting to use the davit lift points (presumes one uses davits, of course!): seats are not positioned such that an angled lift line would fit properly.

Anyway, a reason, if you have one of the WB models with folding transoms NOT to lift aside using those points...
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Old 22-03-2019, 04:47   #33
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Lifting dinghy out for the night

I too use the spinnaker halyard and a block and tackle. One advantage to using the spin halyard is that I can leave the setup rigged when making hops from anchorage to anchorage where Iím sure I wonít be using the kite during sailing.

Since I do this single handed, the block and tackle is mandatory; I can stand at the gunwale and help steer/position the dinghy as it comes up. I use the same rig for hoisting the dinghy on deck.

I hoist the dinghy side saddle almost every night. As noted among other advantages it keeps the dinghy from bumping the boat, particularly when you have wing against current. It also keeps it away from and out from under the windvane which could damage one or both.

Another advantage is that loading the dinghy with whatever you need for your outing is easy. Itís right there, up higher and not bouncing. Just chuck stuff in lower it and go.

In bumpy anchorages youíll want to secure for and aft lines to the dink to keep it in place. I know a few people who have modified small spinnaker poles to make an arm to keep the dink from resting against topsides or stanchions. I have a beefy rubrail so I just line the dink up with that.
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Old 22-03-2019, 08:13   #34
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

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Originally Posted by Sojourner View Post
While I'm down to davit hoist the dinghy as well for short hops, I just gotta say... two hours on deck!!! I'm sure you're exaggerating, but even so, we can hoist and stow motor on pushpit and hoist and invert 3.3 m solid alu dinghy on deck in 7 minutes. We timed it once. It really is that quick.
Yeah, but it depends. Sand in the dink? Slime and tiny barnacles on the bottom? Do you care if sharp tiny barnacles scrape your boat, your lifelines? Do you care if brown slime gets all over the mothership, sails and lines? Almost always those things are present if you have been on location a while. What the process often was for me:
-Go to beach (10 mins)
-Remove engine, safety storage unit, gas tank etc from the dink. (10 mins)
-Wash the interior out using a bucket and sea water (10 mins)
-roll it over and wash , brush, scrape the bottom. (20 mins)
-roll it back over and put everything back on the dink. (15 mins)
-return to mothership (10 mins)
-remove engine, safety storage unit, gas tank etc from the dink.. again (10 mins)
-pull dink around to side of boat and attach lifting devices.
-with dink on deck, roll it over, position it and tie it down (10 mins)
-pull anchor!

Of course, this is worse case scenario, but I'm just saying there's often more to it than just "pulling the dink"
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Old 29-03-2019, 12:47   #35
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

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Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
The halyard can handle it, although I might be a little concerned about pulling at an angle on the sheave up top for issues of possible chafe. Do you have chocks ready for the dinghy to be placed in with room for the engine? If you can keep the engine from banging the boat or more importantly, you and crew, on its way over the lifelines , itís probably ok.
This is standard Caribbean procedure. Three point harness. Lift with a spinnaker halyard to deck level. Lock a chain to the engine, chain through the gas can, chain through an eye on the dinghy, lock the chain to the boat. The spinnaker halyard block makes pull angle no problem. We lift our 10 ft Caribe and 15 hp Mercury 2-st every night. Eliminates growth and wear on the dinghy and no dinghy wave slap at night.
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Old 30-03-2019, 17:25   #36
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

On the Spin Halyard. No chafe, bow elevated slightly, plug out. Chained and locked to the midship cleat at night. So far, not stolen. But you can never stop that, just make it more difficult than your neighbor.
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Old 30-03-2019, 18:47   #37
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
Yeah, but it depends. Sand in the dink? Slime and tiny barnacles on the bottom? Do you care if sharp tiny barnacles scrape your boat, your lifelines? Do you care if brown slime gets all over the mothership, sails and lines? Almost always those things are present if you have been on location a while. What the process often was for me:
-Go to beach (10 mins)
-Remove engine, safety storage unit, gas tank etc from the dink. (10 mins)
-Wash the interior out using a bucket and sea water (10 mins)
-roll it over and wash , brush, scrape the bottom. (20 mins)
-roll it back over and put everything back on the dink. (15 mins)
-return to mothership (10 mins)
-remove engine, safety storage unit, gas tank etc from the dink.. again (10 mins)
-pull dink around to side of boat and attach lifting devices.
-with dink on deck, roll it over, position it and tie it down (10 mins)
-pull anchor!

Of course, this is worse case scenario, but I'm just saying there's often more to it than just "pulling the dink"
You must live in an alternate universe to mine.

My dink gets hoisted side saddle at least every few days. That takes approximately 1 minute as the lifting bridle stays rigged in the dink. So there is nothing on the bottom to clean off.

When it comes on deck, I lift it from the bow eye so it's vertical. If it has sand in it, the saltwater wash down makes short work of that while it's hanging next to the boat.

It takes me about 10 minutes, start to finish (removing the engine, stowing the engine, lifting the dink out and securing it on deck) to complete the process. Maybe 15 if it's dirty inside. Maybe I'm fast because I do it a lot. I generally don't tow the dinghy except on day sails in under 15 knots of wind. Even then sometimes it's easier for me to just stow it than to worry about it.
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Old 30-03-2019, 18:51   #38
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

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Originally Posted by Pete O Static View Post
On the Spin Halyard. No chafe, bow elevated slightly, plug out. Chained and locked to the midship cleat at night. So far, not stolen. But you can never stop that, just make it more difficult than your neighbor.
8 hp two stroke Yammie on an AB 9' UL. I'm with you, great combination.

Sometimes wish I had a bigger dink, but it's so manageable it's hard to complain.
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Old 14-04-2019, 17:54   #39
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

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Originally Posted by SVRocinante View Post
Good day all!

I just made a nifty new sling out of 1" webbing for my 10' Mercury inflatable so that we can lift her out of the water at night alongside Rocinante using our main halyard - trying to control the marine growth!

Question; those of you that do the same, do you leave the outboard on?
Seems like a lot of work to take the outboard off, mount it on the aft rail and then repeat the process in reverse the following morning.

I have a 15hp Mercury 2-stroke that weighs ~75 lbs, so figure total weight is I don't know, 175-200lbs?

Can't imagine that's too much for the main halyard and associated gear to handle... thoughts?


As always, Thank you!
First take off the OB, then hoist the tender.
I have a small gantry on the stern to lift the ob. Easy
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Old 15-04-2019, 06:57   #40
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

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Originally Posted by Icarus View Post
First take off the OB, then hoist the tender.

I have a small gantry on the stern to lift the ob. Easy


You really remove your outboard every night when anchored?
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Old 15-04-2019, 07:54   #41
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

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Originally Posted by Icarus View Post
First take off the OB, then hoist the tender.
I have a small gantry on the stern to lift the ob. Easy
Thanks Icarus.

I too have a hoist for my outboard on the stern to lift it onto itís normal stowage spot for when weíre underway, but I donít want to take it off the dinghy every night and put it back on in the morning while at anchor; hence then original question in this post.

BTW, you may not anchor for long periods like we do, so obviously it might not be an issue for your particular situation.

regards,
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Old 15-04-2019, 07:58   #42
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Re: Lifting dinghy out for the night

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Originally Posted by Stu Jackson View Post
Sounds like what a friend told me/showed me what he did.
Thanks Stu! I Like the block and tackle... might go that route and save some grinding on the winch!
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